History

History of Bronze Culture in China

Author: Zhi Dao

Publisher: DeepLogic

ISBN:

Category: History

Page:

View: 197

The book provides highlights on the key concepts and trends of evolution in History of Bronze Culture in China, as one of the series of books of “China Classified Histories”.
Social Science

Stone Vessels and Values in the Bronze Age Mediterranean

Author: Andrew Bevan

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page:

View: 438

The societies that developed in the eastern Mediterranean during the Bronze Age produced the most prolific and diverse range of stone vessel traditions known at any time or anywhere in the world. Stone vessels are therefore a key class of artefact in the early history of this region. As a form of archaeological evidence, they offer important analytical advantages over other artefact types - virtual indestructibility, a wide range of functions and values, huge variety in manufacturing traditions, as well as the subtractive character of stone and its rich potential for geological provenancing. In this 2007 book, Andrew Bevan considers individual stone vessel industries in great detail. He also offers a highly comparative and value-led perspective on production, consumption and exchange logics throughout the eastern Mediterranean over a period of two millennia during the Bronze Age (ca.3000–1200 BC).
Social Science

The Socketed Bronze Axes in Ireland

Author: George Eogan

Publisher: Franz Steiner Verlag

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 362

View: 359

Socketed axes were widespread in the Irish Bronze Age, associated with a range of industrial, domestic and ritual activities reflected in the enormous variety of axe sizes, something that is immediately evident from Eogan's typology and illustrated catalogue. This comprehensive study of Irish bronze socketed axes presents important analyses and interpretations of the composition of the bronzes, of the sources of the ores, techniques of manufacture, consumption and circulation, wear patterns, regional groupings and social organisation. Material is taken from private and public collections, from recent excavations as well as early archives.
Music

Bronze by Gold

Author: Sebastian D.G. Knowles

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Music

Page: 352

View: 177

First Published in 1999. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.
Literary Criticism

The City Trilogy

Author: Hsi-kuo Chang

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 464

View: 226

Taiwan's most innovative science fiction writer presents three tales of intrigue, espionage, betrayal, political strife, time travel, and Chinese history and mysticism. After thousands of years of civil unrest and countless wars, the weary Huhui people of Sunlon City have once again succumbed to a ruthless and overpowering enemy. In Five Jade Disks, the first book in the trilogy, the imperialistic Shan have enslaved the inhabitants of Sunlon City and imposed a harsh martial order. As the Shan fight to retain control of the restless Huhui natives, an unstable rebel alliance prepares to win back its homeland. Amidst the confusion of revolt, Miss Qi, a determined young girl, emerges as an unlikely leader. With the help of her friends and the loyal Green Snake Brotherhood, Miss Qi discovers that an ancient cult and its insidious and unusually powerful leader may hold the key to the rebels' victory—or may yet be the cause of their undoing. As she rushes to put the pieces together, the rebels, divided by internal factions, strive to band together in a heroic attempt to overthrow the Shan. The story continues in Defenders of the Dragon City. The Shan have been defeated, but the victory celebrations of the Huhui are quickly brought to an end. After deserting Sunlon City, the Shan regroup and return for one final and bitter attempt to destroy the weakened rebel forces. During their exile, the Shan turn their aggressions against the indigenous races of the Huhui planet, a colorful mix of peaceful tribes resembling serpents, eagles, and leopards. Forced into the war to save their remaining territory, the indigenous peoples join the Huhui in their continuing struggle against the Shan. The third novel, Tale of a Feather, opens with images of chaos and devastation. The conflict with the Shan has left the city in flames, and refugees are fleeing in droves through the main gates. Taking advantage of the turmoil, a ruthless dictator assumes control of the weak interim government and begins a treacherous campaign to eliminate his adversaries. In this volatile atmosphere, Miss Qi continues her desperate search to discover the origin of the mysterious Bronze Statue Cult and come to terms with the dark power it wields over her people. The trilogy, first published in Taiwan in the late 1980s and early 1990s and widely considered to be a modern classic, is now presented for the first time in English and in a single volume. In these allegorical tales, Chang confronts some of the most serious and divisive issues of our time, including the burden of history and the ravages of oppression, racism, and ethnic displacement.
History

Southeast Asia

Author: Keat Gin Ooi

Publisher: ABC-CLIO

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 1791

View: 927

An in-depth, historical encyclopedia of Southeast Asia, with coverage from prehistoric times to the end of the 20th century for each country in the region. * Over 800 A–Z entries covering a wide range of diverse historical topics from the Bataan Death March to the Ramayana * Contributions from an international panel of over 130 scholars * Illustrations, maps, and photographs that are informative, critical, and up to date * A chronology, bibliography, and index complete the coverage
History

The End of the Bronze Age

Author: Robert Drews

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 252

View: 806

The Bronze Age came to a close early in the twelfth century B.C. with one of the worst calamities in history: over a period of several decades, destruction descended upon key cities throughout the Eastern Mediterranean, bringing to an end the Levantine, Hittite, Trojan, and Mycenaean kingdoms and plunging some lands into a dark age that would last more than four hundred years. In his attempt to account for this destruction, Robert Drews rejects the traditional explanations - earthquakes, migrations, drought, systems collapse - and proposes a military one instead. Combining fascinating archaeological facts with vivid descriptions of military tactics, Drews presents the transition from chariot to infantry warfare as the primary cause of the Great Kingdoms' downfall. Late in the thirteenth century B.C. the barbarians who until then had been little cause for concern to the Great Kingdoms, and who had served the kings as mercenary "runners" in support of the chariots, awoke to the fact that en masse they could destroy a chariot army. There followed an orgy of slaughter, looting, and destruction. From the ashes arose the city-states of Greece and the tribal confederacy of Israel, communities that depended on massed formations of infantrymen. In making these arguments, the author uses textual and archaeological evidence to reconstruct what actually happened in the Bronze Age chariot battles, as well as the combat that characterized the Catastrophe.
Literary Criticism

Pushkin and the Genres of Madness

Author: Gary Rosenshield

Publisher: Univ of Wisconsin Press

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 256

View: 404

In 1833 Alexander Pushkin began to explore the topic of madness, a subject little explored in Russian literature before his time. The works he produced on the theme are three of his greatest masterpieces: the prose novella The Queen of Spades, the narrative poem The Bronze Horseman, and the lyric "God Grant That I Not Lose My Mind." Gary Rosenshield presents a new interpretation of Pushkin’s genius through an examination of his various representations of madness. Pushkin brilliantly explored both the destructive and creative sides of madness, a strange fusion of violence and insight. In this study, Rosenshield illustrates the surprising valorization of madness in The Queen of Spades and "God Grant That I Not Lose My Mind" and analyzes The Bronze Horseman’s confrontation with the legacy of Peter the Great, a cornerstone figure of Russian history. Drawing on themes of madness in western literature, Rosenshield situates Pushkin in a greater framework with such luminaries as Shakespeare, Sophocles, Cervantes, and Dostoevsky providing an insightful and absorbing study of Russia’s greatest writer.