Medical

Research on Alcoholics Anonymous and Spirituality in Addiction Recovery

Author: Marc Galanter

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN:

Category: Medical

Page: 449

View: 796

It was once taken for granted that peer-assisted groups such as Alcoholics Anonymous had no “real” value in recovery from addiction. More recently, evidence-based medicine is recognizing a spiritual component in healing—especially when it comes to addiction. The newest edition of Recent Developments in Alcoholism reflects this change by focusing on the 12-step model of recovery as well as mindfulness meditation and other spiritually oriented activity. More than thirty contributors bring together historical background, research findings, and clinical wisdom to analyze the compatibility of professional treatment and nonprofessional support, day-to-day concepts of relapse prevention, the value of community building in recovery, and much more. Among the topics covered: (1) How and why 12-step groups work. (2) The impact of the spiritual on mainstream treatment. (3) The impact of AA on other nonprofessional recovery programs. (4) AA outcomes for special populations. (5) Facilitating involvement in 12-step programs. (6) Methods for measuring religiousness and spirituality in alcohol research. Whether one is referring clients to 12-step programs or seeking to better understand the process, this is a unique resource for clinicians and social workers. Developmental psychologists, too, will find Volume 18—Research on Alcoholics Anonymous and Spirituality in Addiction Recovery a worthy successor to the series.
Self-Help

Alcoholics Anonymous as a Mutual-help Movement

Author: Klaus Mäkelä

Publisher: Univ of Wisconsin Press

ISBN:

Category: Self-Help

Page: 310

View: 396

Part of an international study of Alcoholics Anonymous, carried out in collaboration with the World Health Organization, Regional Office for Europe
Self-Help

Alcoholics Anonymous

Author: Bill W.

Publisher: Courier Corporation

ISBN:

Category: Self-Help

Page: 398

View: 487

Alcoholics Anonymous was founded in 1935 by Bill Wilson and Dr. Bob Smith, who developed the organization's 12-step program. In 1939, they published this volume, which sets forth the cornerstone concepts of recovery and relates stories of those who have overcome alcoholism. A lifeline to millions worldwide, it is the most widely used resource for recovering alcoholics.
Self-Help

Alcoholics Anonymous

Author: Charles Bufe

Publisher: See Sharp Press

ISBN:

Category: Self-Help

Page: 208

View: 509

This well researched, painstakingly documented book provides detailed information on the right-wing evangelical organization (Oxford Group Movement) that gave birth to AA; the relation of AA and its program to the Oxford Group Movement; AA's similarities to and differences from religious cults; AA's remarkable ineffectiveness; and the alternatives to AA. The greatly expanded second edition includes a new chapter on AA's relationship to the treatment industry, and AA's remarkable influence in the media.
Self-Help

Alcoholics Anonymous

Author: Bill Wilson

Publisher: eBookIt.com

ISBN:

Category: Self-Help

Page: 540

View: 282

Alcoholics Anonymous is a fellowship of men and women who share their experience, strength and hope with each other that they may solve their common problem and help others to recover from alcoholism. The only requirement for membership is a desire to stop drinking. There are no dues or fees for A.A. Membership; we are self-supporting through our own contributions. A.A. Is not allied with any sect, denomination, politics, organization or institution; does not wish to engage in any controversy; neither endorses nor opposes any causes. Our primary purpose is to stay sober and help other alcoholics to achieve sobriety. Features: Original First & Second Edition Forwards Doctor's Opinion Main 164 Pages Spiritual Experience 40+ First and Second Edition Stories Main 164 pages include page numbers regardless of font size or page flow.
Social Science

Becoming Alcoholic

Author: David R. Rudy

Publisher: SIU Press

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 173

View: 110

Affiliation with Alcoholics Anonymous parallels religious conversion, according to David R. Rudy in this timely study of the most famous self-help organization in the world. Drinkers who commit themselves to Alcoholics Anonymous embrace the radically different life-style, the altered world of the convert. To understand this conversion and, more important, to get a grip on the even deeper mystery of alcoholism itself, Rudy sought to answer these three questions: What processes are involved in becoming alcoholic? How does the alcoholic affiliate with, and become committed to, A. A.’s belief system? What is the relation­ship between the world of A. A. members and that constructed by alcohologists? Rudy establishes the history and structure of A. A. and examines the organization’s relationship to dominant sociological models, theories, and definitions of alcoholism.
Religion

The Akron Genesis of Alcoholics Anonymous

Author: Dick B

Publisher: First Edition Design Pub.

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 193

View: 678

The story of A.A.'s birth at Dr. Bob's Home in Akron on June 10, 1935. It tells what early AAs did in their meetings, homes, and hospital visits; what they read; and how their ideas developed from the Bible, the Oxford Group, and Christian literature. It depicts the roles of A.A. founders and their wives, and of Henrietta Seiberling, and T. Henry & Clarace Williams. Foreword by John F. Seiberling Finally--a history that ties together the events in New York and Akron during A.A.'s formative years from 1931-1939. It tells of the Bud Firestone Miracle and the 1933 Oxford Group events in Akron. Then of the early meetings in New York and Akron. It details the specific contributions to A.A. that T. Henry and Clarace Williams, Henrietta Seiberling, Bill Wilson, and Dr. Bob and Anne Smith made at A.A.'s Akron birthplace. It covers the when, where and how of A.A.'s birth. There are details as to surrenders, hospitalization, meetings, literature, Bible study and prayer and meditation, and what the Akron people did in their homes. And there are precise traces from the Bible, the Four Absolutes, Christian writers, and the Oxford Group into the Twelve Steps and the Big Book. This book is about what Akron gave to A.A. and what A.A. can attribute to its Akron birthplace.
Self-Help

The 7 Points of Alcoholics Anonymous

Author: Richmond Walker

Publisher: Hazelden Publishing

ISBN:

Category: Self-Help

Page: 112

View: 427

The 7 Points of Alcoholics Anonymous is the final work of Richmond Walker, author of the best-selling, beloved book, Twenty-Four Hours a Day. This book is the summation of Walker's knowledge on the practice and fundamentals of 12 Step recovery. Topics include an overview and history of A.A., the nature of alcoholism and recovery, the 12 Step way, fellowship, surrender, character defects, amends, living One Day at a Time, and sharing.
Social Science

Alcoholic Thinking

Author: Danny M. Wilcox

Publisher: Greenwood Publishing Group

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 141

View: 277

Based on long-term observation of Alcoholics Anonymous, the author focuses on cultural rather than personal causes of drug dependence. The author also discusses how the symbolic action of AA language and culture is the key to recovery. This study yields critical information about the development and practice of alcoholism and other drug dependence. Through the shared linguistic and cultural interaction of AA, the U.S. cultural ideology that emphasizes individualism, personal achievement, self-control, and self-reliance is shown to result in conflict; thus the gap between the perceived ideal and reality intensifies feelings of separation, alienation, and isolation leading to dependency. This detailed ethnographic narrative of Alcoholics Anonymous is based on three years of participant observation. The study suggests that anyone can be victimized by alcoholic thinking. Anthropologists, sociologists, psychologists, health care and professional social services organizations will be interested in this book.
Language Arts & Disciplines

Storytelling in Alcoholics Anonymous

Author: George H. Jensen

Publisher: SIU Press

ISBN:

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 163

View: 294

"Jensen covers Bakhtin's theory of the relationship between the author and the hero of a text, using Lillian Roth's autobiographies as counterexamples of AA talks. He discusses "rigorous honesty" within AA programs and provides a detailed analysis of the rhetorical act of stating "I am an alcoholic" in the context of an AA meeting. He devotes an entire chapter to explaining how AA meetings provide an example of what Bakhtin meant by carnival, a process through which humor, irony, and parody supply a mechanism for questioning commonly held beliefs. He shows how newcomers to AA move away from their egocentric personae as practicing alcoholics to adopt a new identity within AA. Turning back to Bakhtin, he describes the moments of discourse during which individuals confess past wrongs to God and to another person. Drawing further on Bakhtin, he examines the autobiographical moments of AA talks, stressing that these moments never become fully autobiographical.