Business & Economics

Approaches to Economic Geography

Author: Ray Hudson

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 280

View: 337

The last four decades have seen major changes in the global economy, with the collapse of communism and the spread of capitalism into parts of the world from which it had previously been excluded. Beginning with a grounding in Marxian political economy, this book explores a range of new ideas as to what economic geography can offer as it intersects with public policy and planning in the new globalised economy. Approaches to Economic Geography draws together the formidable work of Ray Hudson into an authoritative collection, offering a unique approach to the understanding of the changing geographies of the global economy. With chapters covering subjects ranging from uneven development to social economy, this volume explores how a range of perspectives, including evolutionary and institutional approaches, can further elucidate how such economies and their geographies are reproduced. Subsequent chapters argue that greater attention must be given to the relationships between the economy and nature, and that more consideration needs to be given to the growing significance of illegal activities in the economy. The book will be of interest to students studying economic geography as well as researchers and policy makers that recognise the importance of the relationships between economy and geography as we move towards a sustainable future economy and society.
Business & Economics

Reanimating Regions

Author: James Riding

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

ISBN:

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 314

View: 528

Writing regions, undertaking a regional study, was once a standard form of geographic communication and critique. This was until the quantitative revolution in the middle of the previous century and more definitively the critical turn in human geography towards the end of the twentieth century. From then on writing regions as they were experienced phenomenologically, or arguing culturally, historically, and politically with regions, was deemed to be old-fashioned. Yet the region is, and always will be, a central geographical concept, and thinking about regions can tell us a lot about the history of the discipline called geography. Despite taking up an identifiable place within the geographical imagination in scholarship and beyond, region remains a relatively forgotten, under-used, and in part under-theorised term. Reanimating Regions marks the continued reinvigoration of a set of disciplinary debates surrounding regions, the regional, and regional geography. Across 18 chapters from international, interdisciplinary scholars, this book writes and performs region as a temporary permanence, something held stable, not fixed and absolute, at different points in time, for different purposes. There is, as this expansive volume outlines, no single reading of a region. Reanimating Regions collectively rebalances the region within geography and geographical thought. In renewing the geography of regions as not only a site of investigation but also as an analytical framework through which to write the world, what emerges is a powerful reworking of the geographic imagination. Read against one another, the chapters weave together timely commentaries on region and regions across the globe, with a particular emphasis upon the regional as played out in the United Kingdom, and regional worlds both within and beyond Europe, offering chapters from Africa and South America. Addressing both the political and the cultural, this volume responds to the need for a consolidated and considered reflection on region, the regional, and regional geography, speaking directly to broader intellectual concerns with performance, aesthetics, identity, mobilities, the environment, and the body.
Business & Economics

Innovation, Regional Development and the Life Sciences

Author: Kean Birch

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

ISBN:

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 148

View: 507

The life sciences is an industrial sector that covers the development of biological products and the use of biological processes in the production of goods, services and energy. This sector is frequently presented as a major opportunity for policy-makers to upgrade and renew regional economies, leading to social and economic development through support for high-tech innovation. Innovation, Regional Development and the Life Sciences analyses where innovation happens in the life sciences, why it happens in those places, and what this means for regional development policies and strategies. Focusing on the UK and Europe, its arguments are relevant to a variety of countries and regions pursuing high-tech innovation and development policies. The book’s theoretical approach incorporates diverse geographies (e.g. global, national and regional) and political-economic forces (e.g. discourses, governance and finance) in order to understand where innovation happens in the life sciences, where and how value circulates in the life sciences, and who captures the value produced in life sciences innovation. This book will be of interest to researchers, students and policy-makers dealing with regional/local economic development.
Business & Economics

The Political Economy of Capital Cities

Author: Heike Mayer

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 182

View: 719

Capital cities that are not the dominant economic centers of their nations – so-called ‘secondary capital cities’ (SCCs) – tend to be overlooked in the fields of economic geography and political science. Yet, capital cities play an important role in shaping the political, economic, social and cultural identity of a nation. As the seat of power and decision-making, capital cities represent a nation’s identity not only through their symbolic architecture but also through their economies and through the ways in which they position themselves in national urban networks. The Political Economy of Capital Cities aims to address this gap by presenting the dynamics that influence policy and economic development in four in-depth case studies examining the SCCs of Bern, Ottawa, The Hague and Washington, D.C. In contrast to traditional accounts of capital cities, this book conceptualizes the modern national capital as an innovation-driven economy influenced by national, local and regional actors. Nationally, overarching trends in the direction of outsourcing and tertiarization of the public-sector influence the fate of capital cities. Regional policymakers in all four of the highlighted cities leverage the presence of national government agencies and stimulate the economy by way of various locational policy strategies. While accounting for their secondary status, this book illustrates how capital-city actors such as firms, national, regional and local governments, policymakers and planning practitioners are keenly aware of the unique status of their city. The conclusion provides practical recommendations for policymakers in SCCs and highlights ways in which they can help to promote economic development.
Science

Key Thinkers on Space and Place

Author: Phil Hubbard

Publisher: SAGE

ISBN:

Category: Science

Page: 356

View: 671

A comprehensive guide to the latest work on space. Each entry is a short interpretative essay, outlining the contributions made by the key theorists.
Business & Economics

Ibss: Economics: 1999

Author: British Library of Political and Economic Science

Publisher: Psychology Press

ISBN:

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 654

View: 919

The International Bibliographies of the Social Sciences have been renowned for their international coverage and rigorous selection procedures for nearly 50 years. Arranged by topic and indexed by author, subject and place-name, each bibliography lists and
Business & Economics

Toward a History of Applied Economics

Author: Roger Backhouse

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 390

View: 515

Histories of economic thought have generally focused on the development of economic theory, notably value and distribution. The activity of applying economic theory to the understanding of particular situations and the solution of specific problems, though a part of the work of economists for several generations, has received relatively little attention from historians of economics. Toward a History of Applied Economics explores such themes as changes in the historical conception of applied economics and its relationship to the “core” of economic theory, the emergence and decline of applied fields, and issues of applying general theoretical tools and concepts to real-world problems. This is the 2000 supplement to the journal History of Political Economy. All 2000 subscribers will receive a copy of this book as part of their annual subscription.
Science

New Models In Geography

Author: PhD Richard Peet

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Science

Page: 408

View: 973

First published in 1989. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.