Religion

Archaeology of the Land of the Bible

10,000-586 B.C.E.

Author: Amihai Mazar

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9780300140071

Category: Religion

Page: 576

View: 1639

Step-by-step, era-by-era, Mazar shows what each major archaeological discovery has to say about the mysterious stories of the Bible--from the beginnings of recorded of human habitation to the tumultuous period of the divided monarchy of Israel and Judah.
Religion

Archaeology of the land of the Bible

the Assyrian, Babylonian, and Persian periods, 732-332 BCE

Author: Amihay Mazar,Ephraim Stern

Publisher: Anchor Bible

ISBN: N.A

Category: Religion

Page: 666

View: 6737

Describes the archaeaological excavations in Jerusalem, explaining how the research reveals connections between history and Bible stories, and how the artifacts unearthed relate to the various historical periods in the Bible.
Religion

Archaeology of the Land of the Bible: The Assyrian, Babylonian, and Persian periods, 732-332 BCE

Author: Ephraim Stern

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9780300140576

Category: Religion

Page: 666

View: 939

Every year thousands of enthusiasts, both amateur and professional, spend the summer months digging in the sands of Israel hoping to find items that relate in some way to the places or events depicted in the Bible. Thousands more view artifacts in museums and long to know the full stories behind them. Archaeology of the Land of the Bible, Volume II, is the essential book for all of them In Ephraim Stern's sequel to Archaeology of the Land of the Bible," Volume I, by Amihai Mazar, this world-renowned archaeologist who has directed excavations in the Holy Land for many years offers a dramatic look at how archaeological research contributes to our understanding of the connections between history and the stories recounted in the Bible. Stern writes about various artifacts unearthed in recent years and relates them to the Assyrian, Babylonian, and Persian periods in the Bible. Accompanied by photographs and illustrations of rare ancient relics ranging from household pottery to beautifully crafted jewelry and sculpture. His discussions bring the biblical world to life.
History

Alexander to Constantine

Archaeology of the Land of the Bible

Author: Eric M. Meyers,Mark A. Chancey

Publisher: Yale University Press

ISBN: 0300141793

Category: History

Page: 363

View: 2296

Provides an overview of the intellectual and religious changes during the Greco-Roman period and their impact on world history.
Art

The Archaeology of Ancient Israel

Author: Amnon Ben-Tor

Publisher: Yale University Press

ISBN: 9780300059199

Category: Art

Page: 398

View: 2805

In this illustrated book, some of Israel's foremost archaeologists present a survey of early life in the land of the Bible, from the Neolithic era (eighth millenium BC) to the fall of Jerusalem and the destruction of the First Temple in 586 BC. Each chapter covers a particular era and includes a bibliography.
Religion

Judah in the Neo-Babylonian Period

The Archaeology of Desolation

Author: Avraham Faust

Publisher: Society of Biblical Lit

ISBN: 1589836413

Category: Religion

Page: 316

View: 2246

The Babylonian conquest of Jerusalem in 586 B.C.E. was a watershed event in the history of Judah, the end of the monarchy and the beginning of the exilic period, during which many of the biblical texts were probably written. The conquest left clear archaeological marks on many sites in Judah, including Jerusalem, and the Bible records it as a traumatic event for the population. Less clear is the situation in Judah following the conquest, that is, in the sixth century, a period with archaeological remains the nature and significance of which are disputed. The traditional view is that the land was decimated and the population devastated. In the last two decades, archaeologists arguing that the land was not empty and that the exile had little impact on Judah’s rural sector have challenged this view. This volume examines the archaeological reality of Judah in the sixth century in order to shed new light on the debate. By expanding research into new avenues and examining new data, as well as by applying new methods to older data, the author arrives at fresh insights that support the traditional view of sixth-century Judah as a land whose population, both urban and rural, was devastated and whose recovery took centuries.
Religion

Cities of the Biblical World

An Introduction to the Archaeology, Geography, and History of Biblical Sites

Author: LaMoine F. DeVries

Publisher: Wipf and Stock Publishers

ISBN: 1556351208

Category: Religion

Page: 420

View: 6279

This text is designed to introduce students of the Bible to the archaeology, geography, and history of many of the important sites of the Old and New Testament worlds. Many of these sites were centers for trade, religion, defense, culture, industry, and government. DeVries details the development of significant sites from villages and towns to cities, based on how the site could meet the essential needs of the people. The availability of water or arable land, proximity to trade routes, and easily defensible terrain were prime factors in determining a city's prominence. This study concentrates on the cities in Mesopotamia, Aram/Syria and Phoenicia, Anatolia, Egypt, and Palestine during the Old Testament period, and Palestine and the provinces of the Roman world during the New Testament period. Special attention is given to the geographical setting of the city, the history of its development, its relevance to the Bible, its distinguishing features, and any significant archaeological discoveries made at the site.
Religion

Doing Archaeology in the Land of the Bible

A Basic Guide

Author: John D. Currid

Publisher: Baker Books

ISBN: 1441206299

Category: Religion

Page: 128

View: 7868

A popular introduction to archaeology and the methods archaeologists use to reconstruct the history of ancient Israel.
History

Archaeology and Biblical Interpretation

Author: John R. Bartlett

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1134768702

Category: History

Page: 192

View: 7579

The contributors in this book use the most recent research in key areas - the early settlements of Israel, early Israelite religion, Qumran, Jerusalem, early Christian churches - to show that ancient writings and modern archaeology can illuminate each other, but only when used with professional care. The essays represent a new generation of archaeologists and historians, with new social, political and religious concerns who draw a fresh and vital picture of the emergence of ancient Israel.
Art

The Archaeology of the Holy Land

From the Destruction of Solomon's Temple to the Muslim Conquest

Author: Jodi Magness

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 0521124131

Category: Art

Page: 385

View: 2701

"In the heart of the ancient Near East (modern Middle East) and at a crossroads between once mighty powers such as Assyria to the east and Egypt to the south is a tiny piece of land -- roughly the size of New Jersey -- that is as contested as it is sacred. One cannot even name this territory without sparking controversy. Originally called Canaan after its early inhabitants (the Canaanites), it has since been known by various names. To Jews this is Eretz-Israel (the Land of Israel), the Promised Land described by the Hebrew Bible as flowing with milk and honey. To Christians it is the Holy Land where Jesus Christ -- the messiah or anointed one -- was born, preached, and offered himself as the ultimate sacrifice. Under the Greeks and Romans, it was the province of Judea, a name which hearkened back to the biblical kingdom of Judah. After the Bar-Kokhba revolt ended in 135 C.E., Hadrian renamed the province Syria-Palestina, reviving the memory of the long-vanished kingdom of Philistia. Under early Islamic rule the military district (jund) of Filastin was part of the province of Greater Syria (Arabic Bilad al-Sham). In this book, the term Palestine is used to denote the area encompassing the modern state of Israel, the Hashemite kingdom of Jordan, and the Palestinian territories"--
Religion

Archaeological Encyclopedia of the Holy Land

Author: Avraham Negev,Shimon Gibson

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 9780826485717

Category: Religion

Page: 559

View: 2906

Spanning ten millennia from earliest civilisation to the Arab conquest this book is the definitive one-volume reference to the ancient lands of the Bible, fusing scientific discovery and literary and religious tradition to produce a deeper understanding of the history of human culture. Here the settings of the world's three major religions are examined, incorporating the most up-to-date archaeological information with the biblical record of the Holy Land, the Encyclopaedia visits the ancient Near East site-by-site, with comprehensive descriptions of hundreds of discoveries as well as providing historical commentary and relevant biblical citations. General articles on subjects such as burial, warfare, cult objects and clothing provide further insight into the material culture and social systems of the biblical period. More than 20 distinguished archaeologists have contributed articles in their areas of expertise complete with details from their own excavations. >
Religion

The Hebrew Bible

New Insights and Scholarship

Author: Frederick E. Greenspahn

Publisher: NYU Press

ISBN: 0814731872

Category: Religion

Page: 231

View: 3824

In April of 2001, the headline in the Los Angeles Times read, “Doubting the Story of the Exodus.” It covered a sermon that had been delivered by the rabbi of a prominent local congregation over the holiday of Passover. In it, he said, “The truth is that virtually every modern archeologist who has investigated the story of the exodus, with very few exceptions, agrees that the way the Bible describes the exodus is not the way it happened, if it happened at all.” This seeming challenge to the biblical story captivated the local public. Yet as the rabbi himself acknowledged, his sermon contained nothing new. The theories that he described had been common knowledge among biblical scholars for over thirty years, though few people outside of the profession know their relevance. New understandings concerning the Bible have not filtered down beyond specialists in university settings. There is a need to communicate this research to a wider public of students and educated readers outside of the academy. This volume seeks to meet this need, with accessible and engaging chapters describing how archeology, theology, ancient studies, literary studies, feminist studies, and other disciplines now understand the Bible.
Religion

The Bible in Church, Academy, and Culture

Essays in Honour of the Reverend Dr. John Tudno Williams

Author: Alan P.F. Sell

Publisher: Wipf and Stock Publishers

ISBN: 1608994759

Category: Religion

Page: 302

View: 3900

This collection of essays celebrates the contribution of John Tudno Williams to the church, to biblical scholarship and teaching, and to the culture of Wales. Written by biblical scholars, historians, theologians, and authorities on Welsh culture, the papers gather around the central theme of the Bible: its interpretation and exegesis and its place in hymns as well as in the visual culture of Welsh Presbyterianism, in theological colleges, and in theological reflection and construction.
Religion

The Memoirs of God

History, Memory, and the Experience of the Divine in Ancient Israel

Author: Mark S. Smith

Publisher: Fortress Press

ISBN: 9781451413977

Category: Religion

Page: 187

View: 2580

This insightful work examines the variety of ways that collective memory, oral tradition, history, and history writing intersect. Integral to all this are the ways in which ancient Israel was shaped by the monarchy, the Babylonian exile, and the dispersions of Judeans and the ways in which Israel conceptualized and interacted with the divine-Yahweh as well as other deities.
History

Israel in Transition: The Texts

Author: Lester L. Grabbe

Publisher: A&C Black

ISBN: 0567027260

Category: History

Page: 239

View: 9806

For more than a decade the European Seminar in Historical Methodology has debated the history of ancient Israel. The really seminal period—one of great debates over a number of different topics—is the four centuries between the Late Bronze II and Iron IIA. This book covers the Seminar session devoted entirely to archaeology.
Biography & Autobiography

David's Secret Demons

Messiah, Murderer, Traitor, King

Author: Baruch Halpern

Publisher: Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing

ISBN: 9780802827975

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 492

View: 9895

The Bible portrays King David as an exceptional man and a paragon of godly devotion. But was he? Some scholars deny that he existed at all. Did he? This challenging book examines the written and archaeological evidence critically in an effort to paint an accurate picture of one of the Bible's central figures. Neither defending nor rejecting the traditions about David, Baruch Halpern, a leading scholar of biblical history and the ancient Near East, traces the origins and development of David's persona. Because the biblical text clearly responds to concerns that can only be contemporary with David himself, we can believe that David was both real and a central actor in the historical drama of ancient Israel. Yet at the same time, the written record also shows that contemporaries understood David's character to be much more unsavory than the tradition has hitherto allowed. Halpern digs beneath the layers of tradition to understand David as an individual, as a person. The man he uncovers turns out to have been complex, ambiguous, and--above all--surprising. According to Halpern, the image of David grew over time. He was the founder of the dynasty that perpetuated the texts about him, and they progressively exaggerated his accomplishments. But in the earliest writings David remains a modest figure, as this book shows for the first time. To understand David as a human being, one must keep in mind that he was primarily a politician who operated in a rough-and-tumble environment in which competitors were ready literally to slit throats. Halpern's work raises many provocative questions: Was David an Israelite or a Philistine? Was Solomon really David's son? Did David take the throne ofIsrael by the consent or against the will of the people? How many murders did he commit on his way to the crown? Indeed, was David someone it would have been wise to even invite to dinner? The challenging arguments in "David's Secret Demons are sure to provoke all kinds of discussion among biblical scholars and general readers alike. In addition--a big bonus--Halpern's accessible, at times humorous prose will itself draw readers everywhere into the compelling story of David found between these covers.
Religion

Essential Bible Study Tools for Ministry

Author: David R. Bauer

Publisher: Abingdon Press

ISBN: 1426758286

Category: Religion

Page: 304

View: 3749

This up-to-date, highly selective bibliography is designed to acquaint students and ministers with major works, significant publishers and prominent scholars in biblical studies. It is the perfect guide for beginning a research project or building a ministerial library. References are included based on the following considerations: (1) usefulness for the theological interpretation of the Bible within the context of the faith of the church; (2) significance in the history of interpretation; and (3) representation of evangelical and especially evangelical Wesleyan scholarship.
Social Science

The Bible and Radiocarbon Dating

Archaeology, Text and Science

Author: Thomas Levy,Thomas Higham

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1317491513

Category: Social Science

Page: 448

View: 9885

Over the past several years, a number of Levantine archaeologists working on the Iron Age (ca. 1200 - 586 BCE) have begun to employ high precision radiocarbon dating to solve a wide range of chronological, historical and social issues. The incorporation of high precision radiocarbon dating methods and statistical modelling into the archaeological 'tool box' of the 'Biblical archaeologist' is revolutionizing the field. In fact, Biblical archaeology is leading the field of world archaeology in how archaeologists must deal with history, historical texts, and material culture. A great deal of debate has been generated by this new research direction in southern Levantine (Israel, Jordan, Palestinian territories, southern Lebanon & Syria, the Sinai) archaeology. This book takes the pulse of how archaeology, science-based research methods and the Bible interface at the beginning of the 21st century and brings together a leading team of archaeologists, Egyptologists, Biblical scholars, radiocarbon dating specialists and other researchers who have embraced radiocarbon dating as a significant tool to test hypotheses concerning the historicity of aspects of the Old Testament or Hebrew Bible. As this book "raises the bar" in how archaeologists tackle historical issues as manifest in the interplay between the archaeological record and text, its interest will go well beyond the 'Holy Land.'
Religion

The Land of the Bible

A Historical Geography

Author: Yohanan Aharoni

Publisher: Westminster John Knox Press

ISBN: 9780664242664

Category: Religion

Page: 481

View: 5789

Since its first publication in this country, Yohanan Aharoni's informative, fact-filled work has been a prime source in its field. Now considerably enlarged, and with both text and maps updated, this classic study offers an even more accurate description of the geography, history, and archeology of Palestine. The Land of the Bible is an essential textbook that will continue to serve both scholars and students for years to come.
Biography & Autobiography

Because They Hate

A Survivor of Islamic Terror Warns America

Author: Brigitte Gabriel

Publisher: St. Martin's Press

ISBN: 9781429927932

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 272

View: 5418

Brigitte Gabriel lost her childhood to militant Islam. In 1975 she was ten years old and living in Southern Lebanon when militant Muslims from throughout the Middle East poured into her country and declared jihad against the Lebanese Christians. Lebanon was the only Christian influenced country in the Middle East, and the Lebanese Civil War was the first front in what has become the worldwide jihad of fundamentalist Islam against non-Muslim peoples. For seven years, Brigitte and her parents lived in an underground bomb shelter. They had no running water or electricity and very little food; at times they were reduced to boiling grass to survive. Because They Hate is a political wake-up call told through a very personal memoir frame. Brigitte warns that the US is threatened by fundamentalist Islamic theology in the same way Lebanon was— radical Islam will stop at nothing short of domination of all non-Muslim countries. Gabriel saw this mission start in Lebanon, and she refuses to stand silently by while it happens here. Gabriel sees in the West a lack of understanding and a blatant ignorance of the ways and thinking of the Middle East. She also points out mistakes the West has made in consistently underestimating the single-mindedness with which fundamentalist Islam has pursued its goals over the past thirty years. Fiercely articulate and passionately committed, Gabriel tells her own story as well as outlines the history, social movements, and religious divisions that have led to this critical historical conflict.