History

History by Numbers

Author: Pat Hudson

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 360

View: 654

Fully updated and carefully revised, this new 2nd edition of History by Numbers still stands alone as the only textbook on quantitative methods suitable for students of history. Even the numerically challenged will find inspiration. Taking a problem-solving approach and using authentic historical data, it describes each method in turn, including its origin, purpose, usefulness and associated pitfalls. The problems are developed gradually and with narrative skill, allowing readers to experience the moment of discovery for each of the interpretative outcomes. Quantitative methods are essential for the modern historian, and this lively and accessible text will prove an invaluable guide for anyone entering the discipline.
History

Does War Make States?

Author: Lars Bo Kaspersen

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 352

View: 527

This engaging volume scrutinises the causal relationship between warfare and state formation, using Charles Tilly's work as a foundation.
Social Science

Vision and Method in Historical Sociology

Author: Theda Skocpol

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 410

View: 451

Some of the most important questions of the social sciences in the twentieth century have been posed by scholars working at the intersections of social theory and history viewed on a grand scale. The core essays of this book focus on the careers and contributions of nine of these scholars: Marc Bloch, Karl Polanyi, S. N. Eisenstadt, Reinhard Bendix, Perry Anderson, E. P. Thompson, Charles Tilly, Immanuel Wallerstein, and Barrington Moore, Jr. The essays convey a vivid sense of the vision and values each of these major scholars brings (or bought) to his work and analyze and evaluate the research designs and methods each used in his most important works. The introduction and conclusion discuss the long-running tradition of historically grounded research in sociology, while the conclusion also provides a detailed discussion and comparison of three recurrent strategies for bringing historical evidence and theoretical ideas to bear upon one another. informative, thought-provoking, and unusually practical, the book offers fascinating and relevant reading to sociologists, social historians, historically oriented political economists, and anthropologists - and, indeed, to anyone who wants to learn more about the ideas and methods of some of the best-known scholars in the modern social sciences.
Social Science

Engaging the Past

Author: Eric H. Monkkonen

Publisher: Duke University Press

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 196

View: 783

Vigorous historical exploration has increased across the social sciences in the past two decades. Originally published as a series of articles in the journal Social Science History, the essays in this volume provide a guide to historical social science by surveying the use of historical data and methodologies in anthropology, sociology, political science, economics, and geography. Each essay in Engaging the Past pays close attention to the unique problems and methods associated with its particular social scientific discipline. By exploring questions raised by both contemporary and more established works within each field, the authors show that some of the best and most innovative research in each of the social sciences includes a strong historical component. Thus, as Eric H. Monkkonen's introduction shows, these essays taken together make it clear that historical research provides a significant key to many of the major issues in the social sciences. Intended for the growing community of both social scientists and historians interested in reading or researching historically informed social science, Engaging the Past suggests future directions that might be taken by this work. Above all, by providing a set of user's guides written by respected social scientists, it encourages future boundary crossings between history and each of the social sciences. Contributors. Andrew Abbott, Richard Dennis, Susan Kellog, Eric H. Monkkonen, David Brian Robertson, Hugh Rockoff
Political Science

Economic Sociology

Author: Arthur L. Stinchcombe

Publisher: Elsevier

ISBN:

Category: Political Science

Page: 282

View: 690

Economic Sociology introduces the student to the main conceptions of economic sociology; illustrates the application of the concepts and theories of economic sociology; and critiques the growing literature that uses economic sociology in the explanation of macroscopic social phenomena, mostly deriving from the Marxist tradition. The book features chapters that discusses the ecological analysis of societies; how economic objectives get translated into requirements on social relations; the basic structure of claims on the flow of benefits from economic enterprises; the reproduction of relations of production; and the general problem of creating a set of roles for new generations to occupy in such a way as to reproduce the basic structure of the economic system, and the shaping of the flow of children's socialization and placement and of adult careers so that the roles will be filled. The text will be interesting to political scientists, economists, and historians.
Social Science

The Wiley-Blackwell Companion to Political Sociology

Author: Edwin Amenta

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 576

View: 646

The Wiley-Blackwell Companion to Political Sociology is a complete reference guide, reflecting the scope and quality of the discipline, and highlighting emerging topics in the field. Global in focus, offering up-to-date topics from an interdisciplinary, international set of scholars addressing key issues concerning globalization, social movements, and citizenship The majority of chapters are new, including those on environmental politics, international terrorism, security, corruption, and human rights Revises and updates all previously published chapters to include new themes and topics in political sociology Provides an overview of scholarship in the field, with chapters working independently and collectively to examine the full range of contributions to political sociology Offers a challenging yet accessible and complete reference guide for students and scholars
History

Confronting the Costs of War

Author: Michael N. Barnett

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 396

View: 388

What determines the strategies by which a state mobilizes resources for war? And does war preparation strengthen or weaken the state in relation to society? In addressing these questions, Michael Barnett develops a novel theoretical framework that traces the connection between war preparation and changes in state-society relations, and applies that framework to Egypt from 1952 to 1977 and Israel from 1948 through 1977. Confronting the Costs of War addresses major issues in international relations, comparative politics, and Middle Eastern studies.
Juvenile Nonfiction

Underdevelopment and the Transition to Socialism

Author: James H. Mittelman

Publisher: Elsevier

ISBN:

Category: Juvenile Nonfiction

Page: 302

View: 281

Underdevelopment and the Transition to Socialism: Mozambique and Tanzania evaluates the promise and problems of socialism in the Third World by considering the political economies of Mozambique and Tanzania. The aim is to provide a basic account, for Marxists and non-Marxists alike, interested in alternative strategies of development in the Third World. It offers a materialist political economy approach that should be useful to an interdisciplinary group of scholars and practitioners. The book is organized into four parts. Part I maps out purposes and procedures. Part II on Mozambique is a factually grounded analysis of an initial conjuncture in the transition to socialism—the capture of state power by workers and peasants. Part III on Tanzania focuses on another vital step on the way to socialism—the nationalization of leading financial institutions and the attempt to place them under the aegis of the immediate producers. Part IV knits together the main strands of the foregoing analysis and ties them to the broad themes discussed at the beginning of this book.