Battle Hymn of the Tiger Mother

Author: Amy Chua

Publisher: Penguin

ISBN: N.A

Category:

Page: 256

View: 6266

The New York Times Book Review “[E]ntertaining, bracingly honest and, yes, thought-provoking.” At once provocative and laugh-out-loud funny, Battle Hymn of the Tiger Mother ignited a global parenting debate with its story of one mother’s journey in strict parenting. Amy Chua argues that Western parenting tries to respect and nurture children’s individuality, while Chinese parents typically believe that arming children with skills, strong work habits, and inner confidence prepares them best for the future. Battle Hymn of the Tiger Mother chronicles Chua’s iron-willed decision to raise her daughters, Sophia and Lulu, the Chinese way – and the remarkable, sometimes heartbreaking results her choice inspires. Achingly honest and profoundly challenging, Battle Hymn of the Tiger Mother is one of the most talked-about books of our times. “Few have the guts to parent in public. Amy [Chua]'s memoir is brutally honest, and her willingness to share her struggles is a gift. Whether or not you agree with her priorities and approach, she should be applauded for raising these issues with a thoughtful, humorous and authentic voice.” –Time Magazine “[A] riveting read… Chua's story is far more complicated and interesting than what you've heard to date -- and well worth picking up… I guarantee that if you read the book, there'll undoubtedly be places where you'll cringe in recognition, and others where you'll tear up in empathy.” –San Francisco Chronicle “Battle Hymn of the Tiger Mother hit the parenting hot button, but also a lot more, including people's complicated feelings about ambition, intellectualism, high culture, the Ivy League, strong women and America's standing in a world where China is ascendant. Chua's conviction that hard work leads to inner confidence is a resonant one.” –Chicago Tribune “Readers will alternately gasp at and empathize with Chua's struggles and aspirations, all the while enjoying her writing, which, like her kid-rearing philosophy, is brisk, lively and no-holds-barred. This memoir raises intriguing, sometimes uncomfortable questions about love, pride, ambition, achievement and self-worth that will resonate among success-obsessed parents… Readers of all stripes will respond to [Battle Hymn of the] Tiger Mother.” –The Washington Post From Publishers Weekly Chua (Day of Empire) imparts the secret behind the stereotypical Asian child's phenomenal success: the Chinese mother. Chua promotes what has traditionally worked very well in raising children: strict, Old World, uncompromising values--and the parents don't have to be Chinese. What they are, however, are different from what she sees as indulgent and permissive Western parents: stressing academic performance above all, never accepting a mediocre grade, insisting on drilling and practice, and instilling respect for authority. Chua and her Jewish husband (both are professors at Yale Law) raised two girls, and her account of their formative years achieving amazing success in school and music performance proves both a model and a cautionary tale. Sophia, the eldest, was dutiful and diligent, leapfrogging over her peers in academics and as a Suzuki piano student; Lulu was also gifted, but defiant, who excelled at the violin but eventually balked at her mother's pushing. Chua's efforts "not to raise a soft, entitled child" will strike American readers as a little scary--removing her children from school for extra practice, public shaming and insults, equating Western parenting with failure--but the results, she claims somewhat glibly in this frank, unapologetic report card, "were hard to quarrel with." (Jan.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved. --This text refers to the Hardcover edition. From Bookmarks Magazine Most critics agreed that Battle Hymn of the Tiger Mother is an entertaining read—lively and humorous, written with the intent to shock. More controversial is Chua’s stereotyping of Chinese and Western cultures, not to mention her authoritarian parenting methods. Critics judged the book largely by asking the following questions: Should self-esteem come before accomplishment, or accomplishment before self-esteem? If the latter, should it be achieved by threats and constant monitoring? Chua’s teenage daughters are undeniably accomplished, but at what emotional cost? While some reviewers found that Chua’s technique borders on abuse and her writing was, at best, self-serving, others were impressed by her parenting results and opined that the West could learn a few things from this remarkably driven Chinese American mother. --This text refers to the Hardcover edition. From Booklist Chua’s stated intent is to present the differences between Western and Chinese parenting styles by sharing experiences with her own children (now teenagers). As the daughter of Chinese immigrants, she is poised to contrast the two disparate styles, even as she points out that being a “Chinese Mother” can cross ethnic lines: it is more a state of mind than a genetic trait. Yet this is a deeply personal story about her two daughters and how their lives are shaped by such demands as Chua’s relentless insistence on straight A’s and daily hours of mandatory music practice, even while vacationing with grandparents. Readers may be stunned by Chua’s explanations of her hard-line style, and her meant-to-be humorous depictions of screaming matches intended to force greatness from her girls. She insists that Western children are no happier than Chinese ones, and that her daughters are the envy of neighbors and friends, because of their poise and musical, athletic, and academic accomplishments. Ironically, this may be read as a cautionary tale that asks just what price should be paid for achievement. --Colleen Mondor --This text refers to the Hardcover edition. Review “Few have the guts to parent in public. Amy [Chua]'s memoir is brutally honest, and her willingness to share her struggles is a gift. Whether or not you agree with her priorities and approach, she should be applauded for raising these issues with a thoughtful, humorous and authentic voice.” — TIME Magazine “Battle Hymn of the Tiger Mother is entertaining, bracingly honest and, yes, thought-provoking.” — THE NEW YORK TIMES BOOK REVIEW “[A] riveting read… Far from being strident, the book's tone is slightly rueful, frequently self-deprecating and entirely aware of its author's enormities… Chua's story is far more complicated and interesting than what you've heard to date -- and well worth picking up… I guarantee that if you read the book, there'll undoubtedly be places where you'll cringe in recognition, and others where you'll tear up in empathy.” — SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE “Courageous and thought-provoking.” — David Brooks, THE NEW YORK TIMES “Breathtakingly personal…[Chua’s] tale is as compelling as a good thriller.” — THE FINANCIAL TIMES "[F]ascinating. . . . the most stimulating book on the subject of child rearing since Dr. Spock." — SEATTLE POST-INTELLIGENCER “Chua’s memoir, Battle Hymn of the Tiger Mother, is a quick, easy read. It’s smart, funny, honest and a little heartbreaking…” — CHICAGO SUN-TIMES
Biography & Autobiography

Battle Hymn of the Tiger Mother

Author: Amy Chua

Publisher: A&C Black

ISBN: 1408825090

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 272

View: 5256

A lot of people wonder how Chinese parents raise such stereotypically successful kids. They wonder what Chinese parents do to produce so many math whizzes and music prodigies, what it's like inside the family, and whether they could do it too. Well, I can tell them, because I've done it... Amy Chua's daughters, Sophia and Louisa (Lulu) were polite, interesting and helpful, they had perfect school marks and exceptional musical abilities. The Chinese-parenting model certainly seemed to produce results. But what happens when you do not tolerate disobedience and are confronted by a screaming child who would sooner freeze outside in the cold than be forced to play the piano? Battle Hymn of the Tiger Mother is a story about a mother, two daughters, and two dogs. It was supposed to be a story of how Chinese parents are better at raising kids than Western ones. But instead, it's about a bitter clash of cultures, a fleeting taste of glory, and how you can be humbled by a thirteen-year-old. Witty, entertaining and provocative, this is a unique and important book that will transform your perspective of parenting forever.
Science

The Triple Package

What Really Determines Success

Author: Jed Rubenfeld,Amy Chua

Publisher: A&C Black

ISBN: 1408852225

Category: Science

Page: 336

View: 5556

Why do Jews win so many Nobel Prizes and Pulitzer Prizes? Why are Mormons running the business and finance sectors? Why do the children of even impoverished and poorly educated Chinese immigrants excel so remarkably at school? It may be taboo to say it, but some cultural groups starkly outperform others. The bestselling husband and wife team Amy Chua, author of Battle Hymn of the Tiger Mother, and Jed Rubenfeld, author of The Interpretation of Murder, reveal the three essential components of success – its hidden spurs, inner dynamics and its potentially damaging costs – showing how, ultimately, when properly understood and harnessed, the Triple Package can put anyone on their chosen path to success.
Political Science

Political Tribes

Group Instinct and the Fate of Nations

Author: Amy Chua

Publisher: Penguin

ISBN: 0399562850

Category: Political Science

Page: 304

View: 6007

Includes bibliographic references and index

Battle Hymn of the Tiger Mother

Author: Kazam Butur

Publisher: HASAT .BOOK

ISBN: N.A

Category:

Page: N.A

View: 352

From Publishers Weekly Chua (Day of Empire) imparts the secret behind the stereotypical Asian child's phenomenal success: the Chinese mother. Chua promotes what has traditionally worked very well in raising children: strict, Old World, uncompromising values--and the parents don't have to be Chinese. What they are, however, are different from what she sees as indulgent and permissive Western parents: stressing academic performance above all, never accepting a mediocre grade, insisting on drilling and practice, and instilling respect for authority. Chua and her Jewish husband (both are professors at Yale Law) raised two girls, and her account of their formative years achieving amazing success in school and music performance proves both a model and a cautionary tale. Sophia, the eldest, was dutiful and diligent, leapfrogging over her peers in academics and as a Suzuki piano student; Lulu was also gifted, but defiant, who excelled at the violin but eventually balked at her mother's pushing. Chua's efforts "not to raise a soft, entitled child" will strike American readers as a little scary--removing her children from school for extra practice, public shaming and insults, equating Western parenting with failure--but the results, she claims somewhat glibly in this frank, unapologetic report card, "were hard to quarrel with." (Jan.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved. From Chua’s stated intent is to present the differences between Western and Chinese parenting styles by sharing experiences with her own children (now teenagers). As the daughter of Chinese immigrants, she is poised to contrast the two disparate styles, even as she points out that being a “Chinese Mother” can cross ethnic lines: it is more a state of mind than a genetic trait. Yet this is a deeply personal story about her two daughters and how their lives are shaped by such demands as Chua’s relentless insistence on straight A’s and daily hours of mandatory music practice, even while vacationing with grandparents. Readers may be stunned by Chua’s explanations of her hard-line style, and her meant-to-be humorous depictions of screaming matches intended to force greatness from her girls. She insists that Western children are no happier than Chinese ones, and that her daughters are the envy of neighbors and friends, because of their poise and musical, athletic, and academic accomplishments. Ironically, this may be read as a cautionary tale that asks just what price should be paid for achievement. --Colleen Mondor
Family & Relationships

The Blessing Of A Skinned Knee

Using Jewish Teachings to Raise Self-Reliant Children

Author: Wendy Mogel

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 1416593063

Category: Family & Relationships

Page: 304

View: 5064

Provides parents with advice on using Jewish teachings from the Torah and Talmud to overcome struggles with raising children, nurture strengths and uniqueness, and encourage respectfulness towards their parents and others.
Family & Relationships

Beyond the Tiger Mom

East-West Parenting for the Global Age

Author: Maya Thiagarajan

Publisher: Tuttle Publishing

ISBN: 1462918417

Category: Family & Relationships

Page: 224

View: 2692

"Beyond the Tiger Mom is a brilliant book—hard-hitting and brutally honest but also balanced, insightful, and funny." —Amy Chua, author of Battle Hymn of the Tiger Mom Dispel the hype and myths about Asian parenting and uncover the practical with this effective parenting guide. Help your child achieve maximum academic potential Train your child to expand his or her attention span Find the right balance between work and play Help your child see failure as a learning experience Learn how to raise tech-healthy kids How do Asian parents prime their children for success from a young age? Why do Asian kids do so well in math and science? What is the difference between an Asian upbringing and a Western one? Why do some Asian mothers see themselves as "tiger moms" while others shun the label? How do Asian parents deal with their children's failures? Is it sometimes good for children to fail? These are just a few of the compelling questions posed and answered in this fascinating new parenting book by educator Maya Thiagarajan as she examines the stereotypes and goes beneath the surface to explore what really happens in Asian households. How do Asian parents think about childhood, family and education—and what can Western parents learn from them? Through interviews with hundreds of Asian parents and kids, Thiagarajan offers a detailed look at their values, hopes, fears and parenting styles. Woven into this narrative are her own reflections on teaching and parenting in Asia and the West. Thiagarajan synthesizes an extensive body of research to provide accessible and practical guidelines for parents. Each chapter ends with a "How To" section of specific tips for Asian and Western parents to aid their child's educational development both inside and outside the classroom.
Political Science

Day of Empire

How Hyperpowers Rise to Global Dominance--and Why They Fall

Author: Amy Chua

Publisher: Anchor

ISBN: 9780307472458

Category: Political Science

Page: 432

View: 6390

In this sweeping history, bestselling author Amy Chua explains how globally dominant empires—or hyperpowers—rise and why they fall. In a series of brilliant chapter-length studies, she examines the most powerful cultures in history—from the ancient empires of Persia and China to the recent global empires of England and the United States—and reveals the reasons behind their success, as well as the roots of their ultimate demise. Chua's analysis uncovers a fascinating historical pattern: while policies of tolerance and assimilation toward conquered peoples are essential for an empire to succeed, the multicultural society that results introduces new tensions and instabilities, threatening to pull the empire apart from within. What this means for the United States' uncertain future is the subject of Chua's provocative and surprising conclusion.
Political Science

World On Fire

Author: Amy Chua

Publisher: Random House

ISBN: 1407058428

Category: Political Science

Page: 368

View: 3681

Amy Chua's remarkable and provocative book explores the tensions of the post-Cold War globalising world. As global markets open, ethnic conflict worsens and democracy in developing nations can turn ugly and violent. Chua shows how free markets have concentrated disproportionate, often spectacular wealth in the hands of resented ethnic minorities - 'market-dominant minorities'. Adding democracy to this volatile mix can unleash suppressed ethnic hatred and bring to power 'ethno-nationalist' governments that pursue aggressive policies of confiscation and revenge. Chua also shows how individual countries may be viewed as market-dominant minorities, a fact that could help to explain the rising tide of anti-American sentiment around the world and the visceral hatred of Americans expressed in recent acts of terrorism. Chua is not an anti-globalist. But in this must-read bestselling book she presciently warns that, far from making the world a better and safer place, democracy and capitalism - at least in the raw, unrestrained form in which they are currently being exported - are intensifying ethnic resentment and global violence, with potentially catastrophic results.
History

Philistine and Genius

Author: Boris Sidis

Publisher: Read Books Ltd

ISBN: 1447484991

Category: History

Page: 112

View: 5874

This early works is a fascinating novel of the period and still an interesting read today. Many of the earliest books, particularly those dating back to the 1900's and before, are now extremely scarce and increasingly expensive. We are republishing these classic works in affordable, high quality, modern editions, using the original text and artwork.
Biography & Autobiography

Tiger Mother Son of a Bitch

Author: Derrick Lin

Publisher: Monex Press

ISBN: 9780578078939

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 112

View: 4119

The book is the true story of of a man raised by a cruel disciplinarian Chinese mother. Her abuse caused the author to suffer social and anxiety disorders as well as to aggravate his Asperger's Syndrome.

Battle Hymn of the Tiger Mother

Author: Ahban Azer

Publisher:

ISBN: N.A

Category:

Page: N.A

View: 6880

From Publishers Weekly Chua (Day of Empire) imparts the secret behind the stereotypical Asian child's phenomenal success: the Chinese mother. Chua promotes what has traditionally worked very well in raising children: strict, Old World, uncompromising values--and the parents don't have to be Chinese. What they are, however, are different from what she sees as indulgent and permissive Western parents: stressing academic performance above all, never accepting a mediocre grade, insisting on drilling and practice, and instilling respect for authority. Chua and her Jewish husband (both are professors at Yale Law) raised two girls, and her account of their formative years achieving amazing success in school and music performance proves both a model and a cautionary tale. Sophia, the eldest, was dutiful and diligent, leapfrogging over her peers in academics and as a Suzuki piano student; Lulu was also gifted, but defiant, who excelled at the violin but eventually balked at her mother's pushing. Chua's efforts "not to raise a soft, entitled child" will strike American readers as a little scary--removing her children from school for extra practice, public shaming and insults, equating Western parenting with failure--but the results, she claims somewhat glibly in this frank, unapologetic report card, "were hard to quarrel with." (Jan.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved. From Chua’s stated intent is to present the differences between Western and Chinese parenting styles by sharing experiences with her own children (now teenagers). As the daughter of Chinese immigrants, she is poised to contrast the two disparate styles, even as she points out that being a “Chinese Mother” can cross ethnic lines: it is more a state of mind than a genetic trait. Yet this is a deeply personal story about her two daughters and how their lives are shaped by such demands as Chua’s relentless insistence on straight A’s and daily hours of mandatory music practice, even while vacationing with grandparents. Readers may be stunned by Chua’s explanations of her hard-line style, and her meant-to-be humorous depictions of screaming matches intended to force greatness from her girls. She insists that Western children are no happier than Chinese ones, and that her daughters are the envy of neighbors and friends, because of their poise and musical, athletic, and academic accomplishments. Ironically, this may be read as a cautionary tale that asks just what price should be paid for achievement. --Colleen Mondor
Fiction

The Death Instinct

Author: Jed Rubenfeld

Publisher: Riverhead Trade (Paperbacks)

ISBN: 9781594485602

Category: Fiction

Page: 564

View: 6623

A tale inspired by the 1920 bombing in New York's financial district finds a Harvard-trained physician and a police department captain teaming up after witnessing the explosion and encountering a French scientist and her troubled brother.
Social Science

The Digital Pandemic

Reestablishing Face-to-Face Contact in the Electronic Age

Author: Mack R. Hicks

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9780882823157

Category: Social Science

Page: 273

View: 3469

Explores how the digital revolution has deprived people of their ability to relate on a one-on-one basis and explains how to retain the advantages of technology while taking crucial steps to reconnect with one another and the environment. Original.
Religion

The Missional Mom

Living with Purpose at Home & in the World

Author: Helen Lee

Publisher: Moody Publishers

ISBN: 1575675560

Category: Religion

Page: 224

View: 5171

Do you see motherhood as a mission and divine calling? Today's Christian moms come from a full range of personal and professional contexts, whether they are homemakers, full-time workers in the marketplace, or somewhere in between. Yet many Christian mothers are living missional lives, using their gifts and abilities to further God's kingdom by engaging the world around them. They artfully, passionately, and sometimes messily juggle multiple callings and demonstrate in their modern-day contexts how they are emulating the woman of noble character in Proverbs 31. The Missional Mom will affirm Christian mothers who desire to not only to build their homes in a Christ-like way, but also engage the world with their skills, abilities, and interests. It won't minimize the importance of a woman's role in her home, but it will encourage her to not ignore the stirrings God has planted within her to extend her influence.
Education

The Smartest Kids in the World

And How They Got That Way

Author: Amanda Ripley

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 145165443X

Category: Education

Page: 320

View: 4948

Following three teenagers who chose to spend one school year living in Finland, South Korea, and Poland, a literary journalist recounts how attitudes, parenting, and rigorous teaching have revolutionized these countries' education results.
Music

The Suzuki Approach

Author: Louise Behrend

Publisher: Alfred Music

ISBN: 9781457405037

Category: Music

Page: 72

View: 8072

In 1971 Louise Behrend collected a significant number of articles written about the Suzuki approach. These articles were published as a ten-part series in Allegro, the monthly newspaper of the New York Musicians' Union. The purpose was to clear up many widely held misconceptions about the Suzuki ideas and to encourage more fine players and teachers to explore Suzuki teaching. Now published in book form, this pioneering information becomes accessible to a much wider audience.

Evaluating Parental Power

An Exercise in Pluralist Political Theory

Author: Allyn Fives

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 1784994324

Category:

Page: 304

View: 6564

Is parental power over children legitimate? And what role do both theoretical analysis and practical judgement play when we make such normative evaluations? While this book adds to the growing literature on parents, children, families and the state, it primarily focuses on one issue: the legitimacy of parents' power. It also seriously considers the challenge posed by moral pluralism, and analyses the role of both theoretical rationality and practical judgement in resolving moral dilemmas associated with parental power. The book makes a number of conceptual and methodological innovations. Whilst parental power is usually conceptualised as a form of paternalism, this book shows that non-paternalistic parental power can be legitimate as well. Although such power is often assumed to involve interference with children's liberty, there is in fact a plurality of forms of parental power. And whilst political theorists offer general rules to resolve dilemmas arising between competing moral claims, it is demonstrated here that, in the evaluation of parental power, practical judgements are required in specific cases. A number of such cases of parental power are explored here at length, including parental licenses, children's informed consent, and civic education.