Law

Black's Law Dictionary

Author: Bryan A. Garner

Publisher: West Legalworks

ISBN:

Category: Law

Page: 1920

View: 819

Features more than ten thousand legal terms and includes a dictionary guide and the complete United States Constitution.
Law

Black's Law, 9th Ed, 2009

Author: West Publishing, Inc

Publisher: Bukupedia

ISBN:

Category: Law

Page: 1943

View: 954

Since becoming editor in chief of Black's Law Dictionary in the mid-1990s, I've tried with each successive edition-the seventh, the eighth, and now the ninth-to make the book at once both more scholarly and more practical. Anyone who cares to put this book alongside the sixth or earlier editions will discover that the book has been almost entirely rewritten, with an increase in precision and clarity. It's true that I've cut some definitions that appeared in the sixth and earlier editions. On a representative sample of two consecutive pages of the sixth can be found botulism, bouche (mouth), bough ofa tree, bought (meaning "purchased"), bouncer (referring to a nightclub employee), bourg (a village), boulevard, bourgeois, brabant (an obscure kind ofancient coin also called a crocard), brabanter (a mercenary soldier in the Middle Ages), and brachium maris (an arm of the sea). These can hardly be counted as legal terms worthy of inclusion in a true law dictionary, and Black's had been properly criticized for including headwords such as these." Meanwhile, though, within the same span of terms, I've added entries for three types of boundaries (agreed boundary, land boundary, lost boundary), as well as for bounty hunter, bounty land, bounty-land warrant, boutique (a specialized law firm), box day (a day historically set aside for filing papers in Scotland's Court of Session), box-top license (also known as a shrink-wrap license), Boykin Act (an intellectual-property statute enacted after World War II), Boyle defense (also known as the government-contractor defense), bracket system (the tax term), Bracton (the title of one of the earliest, most important English lawbooks), and Brady Act (the federal law for background checks on handgun-purchasers). And all the other entries have been wholly revised-shortened here and amplified there to bring the book into better proportion. Hence, in one brief span of entries, the sixth and the ninth editions appear to be entirely different books. That's true throughout the work. But it's not as if I've revised the book with any hostility toward historical material. In fact, I've added hundreds of Roman-law terms that had been omitted from earlier editions and retranslated all the others on grounds that current users ofthe dictionary might need to look up the meanings ofthese historical terms. But whatever appears here, in my view, should be plausibly a law-related term-and closely related to the law. Users ought to be reminded once again about the handy collection oflegal maxims in Appendix B. It is, I believe, the most comprehensive and accurate set of translated maxims to be found anywhere in print-thanks to the erudite revisions of two civillaw experts of the first rank: Professor Tony Honore of Oxford and Professor David Walker of Glasgow. A lexicographer must do what is practicable to improve each new edition ofa dictionary. One of the notable features ofthis new edition is the dating of the most common terms-that is, the parenthetical inclusion of a date to show the term's earliest known use in the English language. For researching these dates, I'm grateful to the distinguished and industrious lexicographer at the Yale Law Library, Fred R. Shapiro. "See David Mellinkoff, The Myth ofPrecision and the Law Dictionary, 31 U.C.L.A. L. Rev. 423, 440 (1983). As a lexicographer, I've learned a great deal from my friends and mentors in the field-especially the late Robert W. Burchfield, editor ofthe Oxford English Dictionary Supplement during the latter halfofthe 20th century. Like his 19th-century precursors at the Oxford English Dictionary, Burchfield had a battalion oflexicographic volunteers from around the globe to help him in his momentous work. I have tried to do the same. Because I genuinely believe in a community ofscholars- a community oflearned people who understand the cultural and historical importance ofhaving a first-rate dictionary, and are willing to playa role in producing it-I have called on volunteers to help in the production ofthis vast and complex dictionary. It has been rewarding to have so many lawyers, judges, and scholars answer the call. Take a moment, if you will, and scan the masthead on pages vi-ix. Consider that each of these contributors personally edited 30 to 50 pages ofsingle-spaced manuscript-some more than that. They suggested improved wordings and solved editorial difficulties they encountered. Consider the geographical variety of the panelists, and ponder the years of specialist knowledge they brought to their work. Look at the panel of academic contributors and notice that they are distinguished scholars ofthe highest order, many ofthem household names among lawyers. They exerted themselves not just for the betterment of this book, but for the betterment ofthe law as a whole. For this is the law dictionary that the profession has relied on for over a century. Everyone who cares about the law owes our contributors a debt ofthanks. Bryan A. Garner LawProse, Inc. Dallas, Texas April 2009
Law

New England Law Review: Volume 48, Number 1 - Fall 2013

Author: New England Law Review

Publisher: Quid Pro Books

ISBN:

Category: Law

Page: 260

View: 540

The New England Law Review now offers its issues in convenient and modern ebook formats for e-reader devices, apps, pads, smartphones, and computers. This first issue of Volume 48, Fall 2013, was published in 2014 and contains articles and presentations from leading figures of the academy, the judiciary, and the legal community. Contents of this issue include: • Commencement Address at New England Law: Boston, May 24, 2013, by U.S. Attorney Carmen M. Ortiz Articles: • Creamskimming and Competition, by Jim Chen • "Give Me That Old Time Religion": The Persistence of the Webster Reasonable Doubt Instruction and the Need to Abandon It, by Hon. Richard E. Welch, III • Standing Up to Clapper: How to Increase Transparency and Oversight of FISA Surveillance, by Alan Butler Notes: • Avoiding Unintended House Boats: Towards Sensible Coastal Land Use Policy in Massachusetts, by Keith Richard • The Moral Judiciary: Restoring Morality as a Basis of Judicial Decision-Making, by Erik Hagen • Tales of the Dead: Why Autopsy Reports Should Be Classified as Testimonial Statements Under the Confrontation Clause, by Andrew Higley Comments: • Putting Beer Goggles on the Jury: Rape, Intoxication, and the Reasonable Man in Commonwealth v. Mountry, by Annalise H. Scobey • A Government of the People, by the People, for Whom? How In re Enforcement of a Subpoena Ensures that the Judiciary Is Unaccountable, by Lindsay Bohan
Law

Criminal Evidence

Author: Jefferson L. Ingram

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Law

Page: 1054

View: 682

In addition to covering the basics of collecting, preserving and presenting evidence, Criminal Evidence, 12th edition, presents the latest developments in the law of evidence that are of interest to criminal justice personnel. Highlights include: chapter outlines, lists of key terms and concepts for each chapter, a glossary, and new, up-to-date cases in Part II. Thoroughly revised, updated, and streamlined to include recent case law on evidence Each chapter includes outlines, key terms and concepts, and review questions to aid understanding Appendices include a helpful glossary; Federal Rules of Evidence as amended and effective through December 1, 2013; Table of Jurisdictions That Have Adopted Some System of Uniform Rules for Regulating the Admission and Exclusion of Evidence through 2014; and Table of Contents of the Uniform Rules of Evidence with 2005 Amendments
Law

New England Law Review: Volume 48, Number 3 - Spring 2014

Author: New England Law Review

Publisher: Quid Pro Books

ISBN:

Category: Law

Page: 242

View: 438

The New England Law Review now offers its issues in convenient and modern ebook formats for e-reader devices, apps, pads, smartphones, and computers. This third issue of Volume 48, Spring 2014, contains articles and presentations from leading figures of the academy and the legal community. Contents of this issue include a Symposium on "Benchmarks: Evaluating Measurements of Judicial Productivity," featuring such recognized legal scholars as Jordan Singer, Hon. William Young, Hon. Lee Rosenthal, Steven Gensler, Chad Oldfather, John Spottswood, Carolyn Dubay, and Malia Reddick. Both trial and appellate courts are considered. In addition, extensive student research explores such fields as copyright infringement by YouTube, corporate crimes and jury findings, employees' remedies under FLSA, and protections of the mechanic's lien. Quality digital formatting includes linked notes, active tables of contents, active URLs in notes, and Bluebook citations.
Medical

Adolescent Sexual Behavior in the Digital Age

Author: Fabian Saleh

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN:

Category: Medical

Page: 384

View: 174

The nexus between the digital revolution and adolescent sexual behavior has posed significant challenges to mental health practitioners, attorneys, and educators. These digital technologies may facilitate dangerous behaviors and serious consequences for some youth. Adolescent Sexual Development in the Digital Age considers adolescent sexual behavior in both clinical and legal contexts and provides a basis for clinicians, legal professionals, educators, policy makers, parents and the general public to understand the impact that technology has on human growth and development. The book's contributing authors are leading authorities in adolescent development, law, and ethics, fostering an interdisciplinary dialogue within the text. New technology poses many opportunities for both normal and risky sexual behavior in youth; including "sexting," social networking, cyber-sexual harassment, commercial exploitation of children, and child pornography. Beyond just cataloging the various technologies impacting sexual behavior, this volume offers guidance and strategies for addressing the issues created by the digital age.
Philosophy

جمهورية أفلاطون

Author:

Publisher: Al Masriah Al Lubnaniah

ISBN:

Category: Philosophy

Page: 376

View: 911

أجل إننا لسنا نوافق أفلاطون في كل نظرياته, وقد نشرناها على مسؤوليته، ولكننا معجبون وأكثر من معجبين, بنظام تفكيره, ورحابة صدره, وضبطه في الإحكام, وفيض بلاغته وبيانه. ونشاركه في غرض التأليف العام وهو((السعادة)) وفي الوسيلة الخاصة المؤدية إلى ذلك الغرض وهي ((الفضيلة)) ونافقه في أن الفضيلة تراد لذاتها ونتائجها. وفي أن الفرد دولة مصغرة والدولة جسـم كبير, وأن ما يسعد الدولة يسـعد الفرد، وأن الرجل الكـامل – المثـل الأعلى – هو الذي تحكم عقله في شهواته, وانقادت حماسته إلى حكمته, وعاش ومات في خدمة المجموع. body,div,table,thead,tbody,tfoot,tr,th,td,p { font-family:"Calibri"; font-size:x-small } a.comment-indicator:hover + comment { background:#ffd; position:absolute; display:block; border:1px solid black; padding:0.5em; } a.comment-indicator { background:red; display:inline-block; border:1px solid black; width:0.5em; height:0.5em; } comment { display:none; }
Law

The Sierra Leone Special Court and its Legacy

Author: Charles Chernor Jalloh

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN:

Category: Law

Page: 824

View: 559

The Special Court for Sierra Leone (SCSL) is the third modern international criminal tribunal supported by the United Nations and the first to be situated where the crimes were committed. This timely, important and comprehensive book is the first to critically assess the impact and legacy of the SCSL for Africa and international criminal law. Contributors include leading scholars and respected practitioners with inside knowledge of the tribunal, who analyze cutting-edge and controversial issues with significant implications for international criminal law and transitional justice. These include joint criminal enterprise; forced marriage; enlisting and using child soldiers; attacks against United Nations peacekeepers; the tension between truth commissions and criminal trials in the first country to simultaneously have the two; and the questions of whether it is permissible under international law for states to unilaterally confer blanket amnesties to local perpetrators of universally condemned international crimes.