Travel

Britain's 100 Best Railway Stations

Author: Simon Jenkins

Publisher: Penguin UK

ISBN: 0241978998

Category: Travel

Page: 352

View: 5597

The perfect new gift from the bestselling author of Britain's 1000 Best Churches It is the scene for our hopeful beginnings and our intended ends, and the timeless experiences of coming and going, meeting, greeting and parting. It is an institution with its own rituals and priests, and a long-neglected aspect of Britain's architecture. And yet so little do we look at the railway station. Simon Jenkins has travelled the length and breadth of Great Britain, from Waterloo to Wemyss Bay, Betws-y-Coed to Beverley, to select his hundred best. Blending his usual insight and authority with his personal reflections and experiences - including his founding the Railway Heritage Trust - the foremost expert on our national heritage deftly reveals the history, geography, design and significance of each of these glories. Beautifully illustrated with colour photographs throughout, this joyous exploration of our social history shows the station's role in the national imagination; champions the engineers, architects and rival companies that made them possible; and tells the story behind the triumphs and follies of these very British creations. These are the marvellous, often undersung places that link our nation, celebrated like never before.
Travel

England's 100 Best Views

Author: Simon Jenkins

Publisher: Profile Books

ISBN: 1847659489

Category: Travel

Page: 474

View: 1837

England's views are remarkable for their beauty and variety. With his usual insight and authority, bestselling author Simon Jenkins picks 100 of the very best from the white cliffs of Dover to Hadrian's Wall - and explains the fascinating stories behind each. Jenkins' entertaining and erudite entries provide the rich historical, geographical, botanical and architectural background to breathtaking sights - all beautifully illustrated - both iconic and undiscovered. From Gold Hill, the Dorset village street so famously picturesque it was used in a Hovis advert, to the view of the City of London famously depicted by Canaletto and the wilds of the Yorkshire moors. This book will inspire you to discover the treasures of England's sea, city and landscapes for yourself. Filled with roman roads, cliff-tops, follies, mountains, ancient castles, rolling forests and heart-stopping moments, you'll soon wonder how you chose walks, mini-breaks or spontaneous diversions without it. The perfect guide to Britain's landscape - now available in paperback.
Architecture, Domestic

England's Thousand Best Houses

Author: Simon Jenkins

Publisher: Penguin UK

ISBN: 9780141006253

Category: Architecture, Domestic

Page: 950

View: 7961

A connoisseur's lavishly illustrated tour of England's most treasured countryhouses is expertly ranked, county by county. Color and b&w photos.
Architecture

England's Thousand Best Churches

Author: Simon Jenkins

Publisher: Penguin Global

ISBN: 9781846146640

Category: Architecture

Page: 880

View: 9494

Simon Jenkins has travelled the length and breadth of England to select his thousand best churches. Organised by county, each church is described - often with delightful asides - and given a star-rating from one to five. All of the county sections are prefaced by a map locating each church, and lavishly illustrated with colour photos from the Country Life archive. Jenkins contends that these churches house a gallery of vernacular art without equal in the world. Here, he brings that museum to public attention.
Architecture

The English Railway Station

Author: Steven Parissien

Publisher: Historic England Publishing

ISBN: N.A

Category: Architecture

Page: 164

View: 4556

The railway station is one of England s most distinctive, characterful and best-loved building-types. This is an accessible, engaging and comprehensively-illustrated general history of the architectural development and social history of the British railway station, from the dawn of the Railway Age to the ravages of the 1960s and the station's rebirth at the end of the 20th century. Traces how the station evolved into a recognisable building type, examines the great cathedrals and the evocative country stations of the Victorian era, and looks at how the railway station has, over the last fifty years, regained its place at the heart of our communities.
Architecture

Railway Architecture

Author: Bill Fawcett

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 1784420476

Category: Architecture

Page: 64

View: 4204

The great arched train sheds of Victorian Britain are often seen as the nineteenth-century equivalent of medieval cathedrals: once specific railway buildings became necessary around 1830 British architects seized the opportunity with both hands, designing some of the great buildings of their age. However, these grand buildings are only part of the story – not only was the country peppered with humbler individually styled station buildings, but also with bridges, signal boxes, engine sheds and other structures specific to the railways. In this illustrated introduction, Bill Fawcett tells the story of railway architecture from the age of George Stephenson to modern times, including such influential architects as Sir George Gilbert Scott and Charles Holden.
Transportation

Britain's Lost Railways

The Twentieth-Century Destruction of our Finest Railway Architecture

Author: John Minnis

Publisher: Aurum Press Limited

ISBN: 9781781313329

Category: Transportation

Page: 192

View: 8972

A striking photographic record of how the Beeching cuts and modernisation saw our grand terminal stations, soaring viaducts and cavernous locomotive works wiped from the landscape The current restoration of St Pancras Station and its Midland Hotel is a glorious exception to a melancholy rule – that the finer our railway architecture, the more likely it was to be demolished in the name of progress. Who would know that the ugly, low concrete bunker of Birmingham New Street station replaced a handsome glass-roofed train shed, or that until the 1960s the stupendously high Belah viaduct swept across a remote Cumbrian valley – or that the outlet mall in Swindon selling cheap designer clothing used to be he great GWR locomotive works? – or that on little bucolic branch lines in the West Country or Essex an old bus body was the waiting-room? In over 200 fascinating and often rare images John Minnis documents the remarkably rich architectural heritage of our railways, from quaint country halts to distinguished railway hotels – all of which exists now only in photographs.
Transportation

The Railways

Nation, Network and People

Author: Simon Bradley

Publisher: Profile Books

ISBN: 1847653529

Category: Transportation

Page: 516

View: 7238

Sunday Times History Book of the Year 2015 Currently filming for BBC programme Full Steam Ahead Britain's railways have been a vital part of national life for nearly 200 years. Transforming lives and landscapes, they have left their mark on everything from timekeeping to tourism. As a self-contained world governed by distinctive rules and traditions, the network also exerts a fascination all its own. From the classical grandeur of Newcastle station to the ceaseless traffic of Clapham Junction, from the mysteries of Brunel's atmospheric railway to the lost routines of the great marshalling yards, Simon Bradley explores the world of Britain's railways, the evolution of the trains, and the changing experiences of passengers and workers. The Victorians' private compartments, railway rugs and footwarmers have made way for air-conditioned carriages with airline-type seating, but the railways remain a giant and diverse anthology of structures from every period, and parts of the system are the oldest in the world. Using fresh research, keen observation and a wealth of cultural references, Bradley weaves from this network a remarkable story of technological achievement, of architecture and engineering, of shifting social classes and gender relations, of safety and crime, of tourism and the changing world of work. The Railways shows us that to travel through Britain by train is to journey through time as well as space.
Transportation

The Great Railway Stations of Paris

Author: Michael Patterson

Publisher: Amberley Publishing Limited

ISBN: 1445669218

Category: Transportation

Page: 96

View: 2017

Michael Patterson examines the great railway stations of Paris.
Literary Criticism

The Digested Read

Author: John Crace

Publisher: RDR Books

ISBN: 9781571431592

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 288

View: 1189

Literary ombudsman John Crace never met an important book he didnt like to deconstruct.From Salman Rushdie to John Grisham, Crace retells the big books in just 500 bitingly satirical words, pointing his pen at the clunky plots, stylistic tics and pretensions to Big Ideas, as he turns publishers golden dream books into dross. In the grand tradition of Tom Lehrer and Stan Freberg, Crace takes the books that produce the most media hype and retells each story in its authors inimitable style. Philip Roth, Don Delillo, Margaret Drabble, Paul Auster, Alice Sebold, John Updike, Tom Wolfe, Ruth Rendell, A.S. Byatt, John LeCarre, Michael Crichton and Ian McEwan all emerge delightfully scathed in this book that makes it easy to talk knowingly about books youve never bothered to read or, for that matter, should have.
Transportation

Britain's Lost Railways

A Commemoration of our finest railway architecture

Author: John Minnis

Publisher: Aurum Press

ISBN: 1781317739

Category: Transportation

Page: 192

View: 4481

The beautifully restored St Pancras Station is a magisterial example of Britain’s finest Victorian architecture. Like the viaducts at Belah and Crumlin, cathedral-like stations such as Nottingham Victoria and spectacular railway hotels like Glasgow St Enoch's, it stands proud as testament to Britain's architectural heritage. In this stunning book, John Minnis reveals Britain's finest railway architecture. From the most cavernous engine sheds, like Old Oak Common, through the eccentric country halts on the Tollesbury line and the gantries of the Liverpool Overhead Railway, to the soaring viaducts of Belah and Cumlin, Britain’s Lost Railways offers a sweeping celebration of our railway heritage. The selection of images and the removable facsimile memorabilia, including tickets, posters, timetables and maps, allows the reader to step into that past, serving as a testimony to an age of ingenuity and ambition when the pride we invested in our railways was reflected in the grandeur of the architecture we built for them.
History

A Short History of England

Author: Simon Jenkins

Publisher: Profile Books

ISBN: 1847657567

Category: History

Page: 384

View: 6660

From the invaders of the dark ages to the aftermath of the coalition, one of Britain's most respected journalists, Simon Jenkins, weaves together a strong narrative with all the most important and interesting dates in a book that characteristically is as stylish as it is authoritative. A Short History of England sheds light on all the key individuals and events, bringing them together in an enlightening and engaging account of the country's birth, rise to global prominence and then partial eclipse.There have been long synoptic histories of England but until now there has been no standard short work covering all significant events, themes and individuals. Now updated to take in the rapid progress of recent events and beautifully illustrated, this magisterial history will be the standard work for years to come.
Railroad stations

The Railway Station

A Social History

Author: Jeffrey Richards,John M. MacKenzie

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9780571269037

Category: Railroad stations

Page: 440

View: 7298

In the preface the authors describe their approach, 'In examining the social history of railway stations we were concerned to treat them not as inanimate objects, but as living, breathing places which, better than any other building type of the last 150 years, reflected the societies around them, public buildings which people used in all sorts of ways and whose significance they instantly recognized when depicted in the theatre, the cinema, paintings, photographs, poetry, novels, and travel works. For this reason we have chosen to allow other voices to tell part of the story, to illustrate through quotation the central, but often differing, role of the station in so many societies and so many lives.'They succeed triumphantly in this aim. After the introduction aptly called 'The Mystique of the Railway Station' there are fifteen absorbing chapters covering: The Station in Architecture (three chapters); The Station and Society; The Station in Politics; Class, Race, and Sex; Some Station Types; The Station in the Economy (two chapters); The Station as Place of Work; The Station in Wartime (two chapters); The Usual Offices; The Station in Painting and Poetry, Postcard and Poster; and The Station in Literature and Film. The scope is comprehensive, the achievement magnificent.'written with great enthusiasm . . . packed with rich detail. This is real social history.' Asa Briggs'full of good quotations, and (the authors) write with the infectious enthusiasm of addicts, captivated by the romance of railways' Times Literary Supplement'remarkable . . . the railway station in all its aspects' A. N. Wilson.
Humor

Assume the Worst

The Graduation Speech You'll Never Hear

Author: Carl Hiaasen

Publisher: Knopf

ISBN: 0525655026

Category: Humor

Page: 64

View: 6845

This is Oh, the Places You'll Never Go--the ultimate hilarious, cynical, but absolutely realistic view of a college graduate's future. And what he or she can or can't do about it. "This commencement address will never be given, because graduation speakers are supposed to offer encouragement and inspiration. That's not what you need. You need a warning." So begins Carl Hiaasen's attempt to prepare young men and women for their future. And who better to warn them about their precarious paths forward than Carl Hiaasen? The answer, after reading Assume the Worst, is: Nobody. And who better to illustrate--and with those illustrations, expand upon and cement Hiaasen's cynical point of view--than Roz Chast, best-selling author/illustrator and National Book Award winner? The answer again is easy: Nobody. Following the format of Anna Quindlen's commencement address (Being Perfect) and George Saunders's commencement address (Congratulations, by the way), the collaboration of Hiaasen and Chast might look typical from the outside, but inside it is anything but. This book is bound to be a classic, sold year after year come graduation time. Although it's also a good gift for anyone starting a job, getting married, or recently released from prison. Because it is not just funny. It is, in its own Hiaasen way, extremely wise and even hopeful. Well, it might not be full of hope, but there are certainly enough slivers of the stuff in there to more than keep us all going.
Art

The Face of Britain

A History of the Nation Through Its Portraits

Author: Simon Schama

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0190621885

Category: Art

Page: 608

View: 9495

Author of a number of celebrated works, including the bestselling The Story of the Jews and Citizens: A Chronicle of the French Revolution, Simon Schama's latest book fuses history and art to create a tour de force of narrative sweep and illuminating insight. Using images from works-paintings, photographs, lithographs, etchings, sketches-found in London's National Portrait Gallery, The Face of Britain weaves together an account of their composition, framed by their particular moment of creation, and in the process unveils a collective portrait of nation and its history. "Portraits," Schama writes, "have always been made with an eye to posterity." Commissioned to paint Winston Churchill in 1954 Graham Sutherland struggled with how to capture the "savior" of Great Britain honestly and humanely. Schama calls the portrait, initially damned, the "most powerful image of a Great Briton ever executed." Annie Leibovitz's photograph of a nude John Lennon kissing Yoko Ono, taken five hours before his murder, bears "a weight of poignancy she could not possibly have anticipated." Hans Holbein's preparatory sketch for a portrait of Henry VIII depicts "an unstoppable engine of dynastic generation." Here are expressions from across the centuries of normalcy and heroism, beauty and disfigurement, aristocracy and deprivation, the familiar and the obscure-the faces of courtesans, warriors, workers, activists, playwrights, the high and mighty as well as pub-crawlers. Linking them is Schama's vibrant exploration of how their connective power emerges from the dynamic between subject and artist, work and viewer, time and place. Schama's compelling analysis and impassioned evocation of these works create an unforgettable verbal mosaic that at once reveals and transforms the images he places before us. Lavishly illustrated and written with the storytelling brio that is Schama's trademark, The Face of Britain invites us to look at a nation's visual legacies and find its reflection.

A Atlas of Railway Station Closures

Author: Ian Allan

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9780711038158

Category:

Page: 128

View: 1986

This atlas shows all standard gauge railway lines built in Britain and the dates of when each line and station were closed. The first part of the book consists of an atlas of the entire historical railway network in Britain and the second part of the book provides a complete index and gazetteer of the stations listing the date of closure (if closed).
History

England's Cathedrals

Author: Simon Jenkins

Publisher: Little, Brown

ISBN: 9781408706459

Category: History

Page: 384

View: 411

England's cathedrals are the nation's glory. They tower over its landscape, outranking palaces, castles and mansions. They attract roughly half the nation's population each year. For a millennium they have been objects of pilgrimage for those seeking faith, consolation and beauty. Still at the start of the twenty-first century, they remain unequalled in their size and splendour. More than any other English institution, cathedrals reflect the vicissitudes of history and should be treasured as such. They are custodians of culture and of the rituals of civic life. They offer welfare and relieve suffering. They uplift spirits with their beauty. In a real sense they are still what they were when first built a millennium ago, a glimpse of the sublime. Gloriously illustrated throughout, England's Cathedrals not only offers us a companion to England's Thousand Best Churches, it takes us on an enthralling tour of the nation and its history, through some of our most astonishing buildings.
Juvenile Nonfiction

Beyond the Sky: You and the Universe

Author: Dara Ó Briain

Publisher: Scholastic UK

ISBN: 1407181335

Category: Juvenile Nonfiction

Page: 304

View: 9288

So you want to go into space? WHY?! (No, really - it's sort of a terrible idea. We humans are perfectly designed for life on Earth. We can walk around, breathe, drink water, eat vegetables, read books, not get poisoned or crushed to death when we go outside - it's lovely right where we are.) Not convinced? GOOD! People have been dreaming about space travel for centuries - there's something amazing about the idea of leaving our planet behind and setting out to explore the Universe - there's so much we still don't know. UK and Ireland's best-loved comedian Dara ” Briain takes you on a journey from the safety of your comfiest chair to the furthest reaches of space (and beyond!)
Architecture

Discovering London Railway Stations

Author: Oliver Green

Publisher: Shire Publications

ISBN: 9780747808060

Category: Architecture

Page: 103

View: 1731

London is the supreme railway city. In 1900 it had fourteen railway termini, more than any other city in the world. A century later only one of them has disappeared completely, and just three have undergone comprehensive reconstruction. All the others are recognisable products of the Victorian railway age that continue to function daily as busy stations for the travellers of the twenty-first century. This book provides the railway enthusiast with a brief history of the principal termini, featuring key aspects of architectural design and engineering but also highlighting anecdotes, myths, personal stories and curiosities about the stations' social and cultural history.