History

Buried in the Bitter Waters

The Hidden History of Racial Cleansing in America

Author: Elliot Jaspin

Publisher: Basic Books

ISBN: 0786721979

Category: History

Page: 416

View: 1931

“Leave now, or die!” Those words-or ones just as ominous-have echoed through the past hundred years of American history, heralding a very unnatural disaster-a wave of racial cleansing that wiped out or drove away black populations from counties across the nation. While we have long known about horrific episodes of lynching in the South, this story of racial cleansing has remained almost entirely unknown. These expulsions, always swift and often violent, were extraordinarily widespread in the period between Reconstruction and the Depression era. In the heart of the Midwest and the Deep South, whites rose up in rage, fear, and resentment to lash out at local blacks. They burned and killed indiscriminately, sweeping entire counties clear of blacks to make them racially “pure.” Many of these counties remain virtually all-white to this day. In Buried in the Bitter Waters, Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Elliot Jaspin exposes a deeply shameful chapter in the nation's history-and one that continues to shape the geography of race in America.
History

Buried in the Bitter Waters

The Hidden History of Racial Cleansing in America

Author: Elliot Jaspin

Publisher: Basic Books (AZ)

ISBN: 0465036376

Category: History

Page: 341

View: 1112

Discusses twelve cases in which racial cleansing emptied entire counties of African Americans from 1864 to 1923.
History

Buried in the Bitter Waters

The Hidden History of Racial Cleansing in America

Author: Elliot Jaspin

Publisher: Hachette UK

ISBN: 0786721979

Category: History

Page: 416

View: 3617

“Leave now, or die!” Those words-or ones just as ominous-have echoed through the past hundred years of American history, heralding a very unnatural disaster-a wave of racial cleansing that wiped out or drove away black populations from counties across the nation. While we have long known about horrific episodes of lynching in the South, this story of racial cleansing has remained almost entirely unknown. These expulsions, always swift and often violent, were extraordinarily widespread in the period between Reconstruction and the Depression era. In the heart of the Midwest and the Deep South, whites rose up in rage, fear, and resentment to lash out at local blacks. They burned and killed indiscriminately, sweeping entire counties clear of blacks to make them racially “pure.” Many of these counties remain virtually all-white to this day. In Buried in the Bitter Waters, Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Elliot Jaspin exposes a deeply shameful chapter in the nation's history-and one that continues to shape the geography of race in America.
History

Racial Cleansing in Arkansas, 1883–1924

Politics, Land, Labor, and Criminality

Author: Guy Lancaster

Publisher: Lexington Books

ISBN: 0739195484

Category: History

Page: 186

View: 1264

Racial Cleansing in Arkansas, 1883–1924: Politics, Land, Labor, and Criminality constitutes the first examination of racial cleansing within a particular state, placing Arkansas’s record of exclusionary racial violence within the context of the state’s political developments, as well as the context of the broader body of ethnic conflict studies.
True Crime

Blood in the Snow

The True Story of a Stay-at-Home Dad, His High-Powered Wife, and the Jealousy that Drove Him to Murder

Author: Tom Henderson

Publisher: Macmillan

ISBN: 9780312948122

Category: True Crime

Page: 346

View: 6251

Describes how stay-at-home father Stephen Grant murdered his wife, Tara, dismembered her, and buried her in the woods, then reported her missing and participated in a frantic, emotional search for her before the truth came out.
History

Street Justice

A History of Police Violence in New York City

Author: Marilynn S. Johnson

Publisher: Beacon Press

ISBN: 9780807050231

Category: History

Page: 365

View: 8692

A professor of history at Boston college unravels the cycles of police brutality and subsequent reform movements within the history of New York City, beginning with the foundation of the NYPD in 1845 and concluding in the present. Reprint.
History

The Bitter Waters of Medicine Creek

A Tragic Clash Between White and Native America

Author: Richard Kluger

Publisher: Vintage

ISBN: 0307388964

Category: History

Page: 330

View: 2561

From a Pulitzer Prize-winner comes the riveting story of a brutal confrontation between Native Americans and white settlers, a harrowing drama that unfolded in the new, idyllic Washington Territory in 1853.
Fiction

The Glass Lake

A Novel

Author: Maeve Binchy

Publisher: Dell

ISBN: 9780440337645

Category: Fiction

Page: 768

View: 9972

An incandescent novel of love, obsession, and the secrets that take root in the human heart, by the author of The Copper Beech and Circle Of Friends. Lough Glass is at the heart and soul of the namesake town clinging to its shore. They say that if you go out on St. Agnes' Eve and look into the lake at sunset you can see your future. But beneath its serene surface, the lake harbors secrets as dark and unfathomable as the beautiful woman who night after night walks beside its waters. Lough Glass is home to Kit McMahon, in a way it will never be to her lovely mother, Helen, who does not fit in with the ways of the people of Lough Glass, and who found an unlikely mate in the genial pharmacist Martin McMahon. Kit adores her mother, but can't escape the picture of her, alone at the kitchen table, tears streaming down her face... or walking alone by the glass lake. Then one terrible night Martin's boat is found drifting upside down in the lake. The night Helen is lost. The night Kit discovers a letter on Martin's pillow and burns it, unopened, in the grate. The night everything changes forever. From the Hardcover edition.
Biography & Autobiography

Destined to Witness

Growing Up Black In Nazi Germany

Author: Hans Massaquoi

Publisher: Harper Collins

ISBN: 9780061856600

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 480

View: 6850

This is a story of the unexpected.In Destined to Witness, Hans Massaquoi has crafted a beautifully rendered memoir -- an astonishing true tale of how he came of age as a black child in Nazi Germany. The son of a prominent African and a German nurse, Hans remained behind with his mother when Hitler came to power, due to concerns about his fragile health, after his father returned to Liberia. Like other German boys, Hans went to school; like other German boys, he swiftly fell under the Fuhrer's spell. So he was crushed to learn that, as a black child, he was ineligible for the Hitler Youth. His path to a secondary education and an eventual profession was blocked. He now lived in fear that, at any moment, he might hear the Gestapo banging on the door -- or Allied bombs falling on his home. Ironic,, moving, and deeply human, Massaquoi's account of this lonely struggle for survival brims with courage and intelligence.
Bibles

The First Book of Moses, Called Genesis

Authorized King James Version

Author: N.A

Publisher: Grove/Atlantic, Inc.

ISBN: 9780802136107

Category: Bibles

Page: 126

View: 1070

The publication of the King James version of the Bible, translated between 1603 and 1611, coincided with an extraordinary flowering of English literature and is universally acknowledged as the greatest influence on English-language literature in history. Now, world-class literary writers introduce the book of the King James Bible in a series of beautifully designed, small-format volumes. The introducers' passionate, provocative, and personal engagements with the spirituality and the language of the text make the Bible come alive as a stunning work of literature and remind us of its overwhelming contemporary relevance.
History

Lies My Teacher Told Me

Everything Your American History Textbook Got Wrong

Author: James W. Loewen

Publisher: The New Press

ISBN: 162097455X

Category: History

Page: N.A

View: 8486

“Every teacher, every student of history, every citizen should read this book. It is both a refreshing antidote to what has passed for history in our educational system and a one-volume education in itself.” —Howard Zinn A new edition of the national bestseller and American Book Award winner, with a new preface by the author Since its first publication in 1995, Lies My Teacher Told Me has become one of the most important—and successful—history books of our time. Having sold nearly two million copies, the book also won an American Book Award and the Oliver Cromwell Cox Award for Distinguished Anti-Racist Scholarship and was heralded on the front page of the New York Times in the summer of 2006. For this new edition, Loewen has added a new preface that shows how inadequate history courses in high school help produce adult Americans who think Donald Trump can solve their problems, and calls out academic historians for abandoning the concept of truth in a misguided effort to be “objective.” What started out as a survey of the twelve leading American history textbooks has ended up being what the San Francisco Chronicle calls “an extremely convincing plea for truth in education.” In Lies My Teacher Told Me, James W. Loewen brings history alive in all its complexity and ambiguity. Beginning with pre-Columbian history and ranging over characters and events as diverse as Reconstruction, Helen Keller, the first Thanksgiving, the My Lai massacre, 9/11, and the Iraq War, Loewen offers an eye-opening critique of existing textbooks, and a wonderful retelling of American history as it should—and could—be taught to American students.
Fiction

Sing, Unburied, Sing

A Novel

Author: Jesmyn Ward

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 1501126067

Category: Fiction

Page: 304

View: 2263

"A searing and profound Southern odyssey through Mississippi's past and present"--
Social Science

The Lynching

The Epic Courtroom Battle That Brought Down the Klan

Author: Laurence Leamer

Publisher: HarperCollins

ISBN: 0062458353

Category: Social Science

Page: 384

View: 9276

The New York Times bestselling author of The Kennedy Women chronicles the powerful and spellbinding true story of a brutal race-based killing in 1981 and subsequent trials that undid one of the most pernicious organizations in American history—the Ku Klux Klan. On a Friday night in March 1981 Henry Hays and James Knowles scoured the streets of Mobile in their car, hunting for a black man. The young men were members of Klavern 900 of the United Klans of America. They were seeking to retaliate after a largely black jury could not reach a verdict in a trial involving a black man accused of the murder of a white man. The two Klansmen found nineteen-year-old Michael Donald walking home alone. Hays and Knowles abducted him, beat him, cut his throat, and left his body hanging from a tree branch in a racially mixed residential neighborhood. Arrested, charged, and convicted, Hays was sentenced to death—the first time in more than half a century that the state of Alabama sentenced a white man to death for killing a black man. On behalf of Michael’s grieving mother, Morris Dees, the legendary civil rights lawyer and cofounder of the Southern Poverty Law Center, filed a civil suit against the members of the local Klan unit involved and the UKA, the largest Klan organization. Charging them with conspiracy, Dees put the Klan on trial, resulting in a verdict that would level a deadly blow to its organization. Based on numerous interviews and extensive archival research, The Lynching brings to life two dramatic trials, during which the Alabama Klan’s motives and philosophy were exposed for the evil they represent. In addition to telling a gripping and consequential story, Laurence Leamer chronicles the KKK and its activities in the second half the twentieth century, and illuminates its lingering effect on race relations in America today. The Lynching includes sixteen pages of black-and-white photographs.
Social Science

Sundown Towns

A Hidden Dimension of American Racism

Author: James W. Loewen

Publisher: The New Press

ISBN: 1620974541

Category: Social Science

Page: N.A

View: 2691

“Powerful and important . . . an instant classic.” —The Washington Post Book World The award-winning look at an ugly aspect of American racism by the bestselling author of Lies My Teacher Told Me, reissued with a new preface by the author In this groundbreaking work, sociologist James W. Loewen, author of the classic bestseller Lies My Teacher Told Me, brings to light decades of hidden racial exclusion in America. In a provocative, sweeping analysis of American residential patterns, Loewen uncovers the thousands of “sundown towns”—almost exclusively white towns where it was an unspoken rule that blacks weren’t welcome—that cropped up throughout the twentieth century, most of them located outside of the South. Written with Loewen’s trademark honesty and thoroughness, Sundown Towns won the Gustavus Myers Outstanding Book Award, received starred reviews in Publishers Weekly and Booklist, and launched a nationwide online effort to track down and catalog sundown towns across America. In a new preface, Loewen puts this history in the context of current controversies around white supremacy and the Black Lives Matter movement. He revisits sundown towns and finds the number way down, but with notable exceptions in exclusive all-white suburbs such as Kenilworth, Illinois, which as of 2010 had not a single black household. And, although many former sundown towns are now integrated, they often face “second-generation sundown town issues,” such as in Ferguson, Missouri, a former sundown town that is now majority black, but with a majority-white police force.
Social Science

Slavery by Another Name

The re-enslavement of black americans from the civil war to World War Two

Author: Douglas A. Blackmon

Publisher: Icon Books

ISBN: 1848314132

Category: Social Science

Page: 496

View: 3140

A Pulitzer Prize-winning history of the mistreatment of black Americans. In this 'precise and eloquent work' - as described in its Pulitzer Prize citation - Douglas A. Blackmon brings to light one of the most shameful chapters in American history - an 'Age of Neoslavery' that thrived in the aftermath of the Civil War through the dawn of World War II. Using a vast record of original documents and personal narratives, Blackmon unearths the lost stories of slaves and their descendants who journeyed into freedom after the Emancipation Proclamation and then back into the shadow of involuntary servitude thereafter. By turns moving, sobering and shocking, this unprecedented account reveals these stories, the companies that profited the most from neoslavery, and the insidious legacy of racism that reverberates today.
Fiction

Buried in Books

Author: Kate Carlisle

Publisher: Penguin

ISBN: 0698411129

Category: Fiction

Page: 288

View: 1559

In the latest in this New York Times bestselling series, matrimony and murder collide as San Francisco book-restoration expert Brooklyn Wainwright walks down the aisle. . . Brooklyn has it all covered. She's triple-checked her wedding to-do list, and everything is on track for the upcoming ceremony with the love of her life, security expert Derek Stone. Not everyone has been as lucky in love as Brooklyn. Her old library college roommates Heather and Sara lost touch twelve years ago when Sara stole Heather's boyfriend. Brooklyn was caught in the middle and hasn't seen her former besties since their falling-out. When they both arrive in town for the annual librarians' convention and then show up at her surprise bridal shower, Brooklyn is sure drama will ensue. But she's touched when the women seem willing to sort out their differences and gift her rare copies of The Three Musketeers and The Blue Fairy Book. Brooklyn's prewedding calm is shattered when one of her formerly feuding friends is found murdered and Brooklyn determines that one of the rare books is a forgery. She can't help but wonder if the victim played a part in this fraud, or if she was targeted because she discovered the scam. With a killer and con artist on the loose, Brooklyn and Derek--with the unsolicited help of their meddling mothers--must catch the culprit before their big day turns into a big mess.
History

Ghosts of the Tsunami

Death and Life in Japan's Disaster Zone

Author: Richard Lloyd Parry

Publisher: MCD

ISBN: 0374710937

Category: History

Page: 320

View: 1081

Named one of the best books of 2017 by The Guardian, NPR, GQ, The Economist, Bookforum, Amazon, and Lit Hub The definitive account of what happened, why, and above all how it felt, when catastrophe hit Japan—by the Japan correspondent of The Times (London) and author of People Who Eat Darkness On March 11, 2011, a powerful earthquake sent a 120-foot-high tsunami smashing into the coast of northeast Japan. By the time the sea retreated, more than eighteen thousand people had been crushed, burned to death, or drowned. It was Japan’s greatest single loss of life since the atomic bombing of Nagasaki. It set off a national crisis and the meltdown of a nuclear power plant. And even after the immediate emergency had abated, the trauma of the disaster continued to express itself in bizarre and mysterious ways. Richard Lloyd Parry, an award-winning foreign correspondent, lived through the earthquake in Tokyo and spent six years reporting from the disaster zone. There he encountered stories of ghosts and hauntings, and met a priest who exorcised the spirits of the dead. And he found himself drawn back again and again to a village that had suffered the greatest loss of all, a community tormented by unbearable mysteries of its own. What really happened to the local children as they waited in the schoolyard in the moments before the tsunami? Why did their teachers not evacuate them to safety? And why was the unbearable truth being so stubbornly covered up? Ghosts of the Tsunami is a soon-to-be classic intimate account of an epic tragedy, told through the accounts of those who lived through it. It tells the story of how a nation faced a catastrophe, and the struggle to find consolation in the ruins.
Social Science

White Man's Heaven

The Lynching and Expulsion of Blacks in the Southern Ozarks, 1894-1909

Author: Kimberly Harper

Publisher: University of Arkansas Press

ISBN: 1610754565

Category: Social Science

Page: 325

View: 1339

Drawing on court records, newspaper accounts, penitentiary records, letters, and diaries, White Man’s Heaven is a thorough investigation into the lynching and expulsion of African Americans in the Missouri and Arkansas Ozarks in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Kimberly Harper explores events in the towns of Monett, Pierce City, Joplin, and Springfield, Missouri, and Harrison, Arkansas, to show how post–Civil War vigilantism, an established tradition of extralegal violence, and the rapid political, economic, and social change of the New South era happened independently but were also part of a larger, interconnected regional experience. Even though some whites, especially in Joplin and Springfield, tried to stop the violence and bring the lynchers to justice, many African Americans fled the Ozarks, leaving only a resilient few behind and forever changing the racial composition of the region.
Fiction

Red and Buried

Author: James Mullaney

Publisher: Moonstone Press

ISBN: 9781936814435

Category: Fiction

Page: 266

View: 8168

By the author of The New Destroyer, the Adventures of Remo Williams! WHO IS THE RED MENACE? In the 1950s, the mysterious masked figure was a shadow and a whisper in Cold War corridors from Moscow to Beijing. Where walked the Red Menace, America's enemies knew fear. And death. Then, in 1960, the whisper grew silent. Twelve years later, Patrick "Podge" Becket thinks he's escaped the spy game for good, but into his restless retirement steps a ghost from his past; a bitter Russian colonel with nothing to lose and the means to wreak worldwide destruction! Aided by brilliant inventor and physician Dr. Thaddeus Wainwright, the Red Menace is reborn for a new generation. But it's a whole new world out there, and if he doesn't watch his step the swingin' Seventies might just find him RED AND BURIED!
Social Science

Black Stats

African Americans by the Numbers in the Twenty-first Century

Author: Monique W. Morris

Publisher: New Press, The

ISBN: 1595589260

Category: Social Science

Page: 240

View: 3644

Black Stats—a comprehensive guide filled with contemporary facts and figures on African Americans—is an essential reference for anyone attempting to fathom the complex state of our nation. With fascinating and often surprising information on everything from incarceration rates, lending practices, and the arts to marriage, voting habits, and green jobs, the contextualized material in this book will better attune readers to telling trends while challenging commonly held, yet often misguided, perceptions. A compilation that at once highlights measures of incredible progress and enumerates the disparate impacts of social policies and practices, this book is a critical tool for advocates, educators, and policy makers. Black Stats offers indispensable information that is sure to enlighten discussions and provoke debates about the quality of Black life in the United States today—and help chart the path to a better future. There are less than a quarter-million Black public school teachers in the U.S.—representing just 7 percent of all teachers in public schools. Approximately half of the Black population in the United States lives in neighborhoods that have no White residents. In the five years before the Great Recession, the number of Black-owned businesses in the United States increased by 61 percent. A 2010 study found that 41 percent of Black youth feel that rap music videos should be more political. There are no Black owners or presidents of an NFL franchise team. 78 percent of Black Americans live within 30 miles of a coal-fired power plant, compared with 56 percent of White Americans.