Fiction

Cooking for Picasso

Author: Camille Aubray

Publisher: Ballantine Books

ISBN:

Category: Fiction

Page: 400

View: 713

For readers of Paula McLain, Nancy Horan, and Melanie Benjamin, this captivating novel is inspired by a little-known interlude in the artist’s life. “A tasty blend of romance, mystery, and French cooking.”—Margaret Atwood, via Twitter The French Riviera, spring 1936: It’s off-season in the lovely seaside village of Juan-les-Pins, where seventeen-year-old Ondine cooks with her mother in the kitchen of their family-owned Café Paradis. A mysterious new patron who’s slipped out of Paris and is traveling under a different name has made an unusual request—to have his lunch served to him at the nearby villa he’s secretly rented, where he wishes to remain incognito. Pablo Picasso is at a momentous crossroads in his personal and professional life—and for him, art and women are always entwined. The spirited Ondine, chafing under her family’s authority and nursing a broken heart, is just beginning to discover her own talents and appetites. Her encounter with Picasso will continue to affect her life for many decades onward, as the great artist and the talented young chef each pursue their own passions and destiny. New York, present day: Céline, a Hollywood makeup artist who’s come home for the holidays, learns from her mother, Julie, that Grandmother Ondine once cooked for Picasso. Prompted by her mother’s enigmatic stories and the hint of more family secrets yet to be uncovered, Céline carries out Julie’s wishes and embarks on a voyage to the very town where Ondine and Picasso first met. In the lush, heady atmosphere of the Côte d’Azur, and with the help of several eccentric fellow guests attending a rigorous cooking class at her hotel, Céline discovers truths about art, culture, cuisine, and love that enable her to embrace her own future. Featuring an array of both fictional characters and the French Riviera’s most famous historical residents, set against the breathtaking scenery of the South of France, Cooking for Picasso is a touching, delectable, and wise story, illuminating the powers of trust, money, art, and creativity in the choices that men and women make as they seek a path toward love, success, and joie de vivre. Praise for Cooking for Picasso “Intrigue, art, food, and deception are woven together in a tale of love and betrayal around the life and legacy of Picasso. Touching and true, this well-written narrative made me long for my mother’s coq au vin and for the sun of Juan-les-Pins.”—Jacques Pépin, chef, TV personality, author “Intriguing and insightful, the sensory details alone will have you thinking you’re reading the pages seated at a seaside café in the South of France.”—Susan Meissner, author of Secrets of a Charmed Life “[A] delicious, atmospheric novel . . . You’ll be glad you’re along for the ride.”—People (Pick for “The Best New Books”) “[A] colorful family saga . . . Cooking for Picasso is . . . about how people take what seems to be worthless and make it into something priceless. . . . The characters in Camille Aubray’s debut novel illustrate . . . that value lies not in what you own, but in who you are.”—The Washington Post “This richly crafted tale of love, trust, art and food is wonderfully evocative of the sun-kissed Côte d’Azur, while weaving in a modern-day mystery. . . . Ideal for whiling away some time en vacances on the Riviera.”—France Today “[A] sweet summer escape.”—Cosmopolitan
Cooking

Making Modern Meals

Author: Amy B. Trubek

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN:

Category: Cooking

Page: 292

View: 744

Home cooking is crucial to our lives, but today we no longer identify it as an obligatory everyday chore. By looking closely at the stories and practices of contemporary American home cooks--witnessing them in the kitchen and at the table--Amy B. Trubek reveals our episodic but also engaged relationship to making meals. Making Modern Meals explores the state of American cooking over the past century and across all its varied practices, whether cooking is considered a chore, a craft, or a creative process. Trubek challenges current assumptions about who cooks, who doesn't, and what this means for culture, cuisine, and health. She locates, identifies, and discusses the myriad ways Americans cook in the modern age, and in doing so, argues that changes in making our meals--from shopping to cooking to dining--have created new cooks, new cooking categories, and new culinary challenges.
Biography & Autobiography

The True Story of Alice B. Toklas

Author: Anna Linzie

Publisher: University of Iowa Press

ISBN:

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 222

View: 809

In this original and intriguing study, Anna Linzie examines three mid-twentieth-century texts never before treated as interrelated in a book-length work of literary criticism: Gertrude Stein's The Autobiography of Alice B. Toklas (1933) and Alice B. Toklas's The Alice B. Toklas Cook Book (1954) and What Is Remembered (1963). Taking these three texts as intertexts or as an assemblage of the true story of Alice B. Toklas, Linzie challenges assumptions about primary authorship and singular identity that have continued to limit lesbian and feminist rereadings of autobiography as a genre and of Stein and Toklas as writers and historical figures.The True Story of Alice B. Toklas explores how the concept of autobiography as a primarily referential genre is challenged and transformed in relation to autobiographical texts written about the same person, the same life, but differently, by different writers, at different points in time. The concept of one true story is deconstructed in the process as Linzie modifies Homi K. Bhabha's “almost the same but not quite/not white” for the purposes of this particular study as “almost the same but not quite/not straight.” The investigation moves simultaneously on the planes of textuality and sexuality in order to provisionally articulate a “lesbian autobiographical subject” in Linzie's reading of these three texts.Linzie's study fills a gap in literary criticism where Stein's companion and her work have been more or less neglected, conceptualizing the Stein-Toklas sexual/textual relationship as fundamentally reciprocal. The True Story of Alice B. Toklas provides a new critical perspective on Toklas as indispensable to Stein's literary production, a cultural laborer in her own right, and a writer of her own books. Making a significant contribution to recent lesbian/feminist reconceptualizations of the genre of autobiography, this study will fascinate Stein and Toklas scholars as well as those interested in queer and autobiography studies.

Picasso's Kitchen

Author: Pablo Picasso

Publisher: La Fabrica

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 328

View: 262

Picasso's Kitchen delves, for the first time, into the relationship between Picasso and cooking. Food and kitchenware are present in many of his still-lifes, such as the tomato plant in the Grands- Augustins studio, the eel stew that his wife Jacqueline used to cook, the main painting he made on Manet's Le dejeuner sur l'herbe... Cuisine is also a recurring topic in his poetry, and many of his sculptures are based on kitchen utensils, such as his famous cubist absinthe glass. This publication addresses food and cuisine in Picasso's work, but also the restaurants that marked his life - such as the famous Le Catalan, near his studio on Grands-Augustins Street, in which Picasso used to eat with his friends during German occupation - as well as the importance of restaurants as meeting points for the avant-garde, from Quatre Gats in Barcelona to Lapin Agile in Montmartre, Paris. The exhibition Picasso's Kitchen will be open to the public from May to September 2018, at the Picasso Museum in Barcelona.
Fiction

The Piltdown Picasso

Author: Robin Richards

Publisher: Troubador Publishing Ltd

ISBN:

Category: Fiction

Page: 200

View: 541

The Piltdown Picasso is a fast-moving, well-plotted thriller, peopled by compelling characters shot through with a strong thread of humour. Matthew (Fax) Fairfax, a man with a past, arrives back in London after spending some years travelling and is quickly drawn into the capital’s fine art community. After helping a friend out with a favour he finds himself framed as the prime suspect when celebrity Mika Slade, who has recently purchased a dubious Picasso, is gunned down. Fairfax is released from police custody due to lack of evidence and joins forces with Gabi, Slade’s zany PA, in an attempt to identify the murderer. They discover that beneath the gloss and polish of London’s art world lurks a sleazy underbelly of drugs, insurance scams and art fraud. An industry where crooked dealers threaten, maim, kidnap and murder to ensure their lucrative trade continues in a rigged marketplace where no work of art is quite what it seems. When Gabi is taken hostage, and possibly poisoned by the fumes from the art forger’s lethal liquid Bakelite, Fairfax confronts the scam’s mastermind in a dramatic and fatal climax high above the Turbine Hall of Tate Modern. A rip roaring tale of art and crime, this is the perfect book for all crime fiction fans.
Cooking

Murder in the Kitchen

Author: Alice B. Toklas

Publisher: Penguin UK

ISBN:

Category: Cooking

Page: 96

View: 453

In this memoir-turned-cookbook, Alice B. Toklas describes her life with partner Gertrude Stein and their famed Paris salon, which entertained the great avant-garde and literary figures of their day. With dry wit and characteristic understatement Toklas ponders the ethics of killing a carp in her kitchen before stuffing it with chestnuts; decorating a fish to amuse Picasso at lunch; and travelling across France during the First World War in an old delivery truck, gathering local recipes along the way. She includes a friend's playful recipe for 'Haschiche Fudge', which promises 'brilliant storms of laughter and ecstatic reveries', much like her book.
Science

Note-by-Note Cooking

Author: Hervé This

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN:

Category: Science

Page: 272

View: 204

Note-by-Note Cooking is a landmark in the annals of gastronomy, liberating cooks from the constraints of traditional ingredients and methods through the use of pure molecular compounds. 1-Octen-3-ol, which has a scent of wild mushrooms; limonene, a colorless liquid hydrocarbon that has the smell of citrus; sotolon, whose fragrance at high concentrations resembles curry and at low concentrations, maple syrup or sugar; tyrosine, an odorless but flavorful amino acid present in cheese—these and many other substances, some occurring in nature, some synthesized in the laboratory, make it possible to create novel tastes and flavors in the same way that elementary sound waves can be combined to create new sounds. Note-by-note cooking promises to add unadulterated nutritional value to dishes of all kinds, actually improving upon the health benefits of so-called natural foods. Cooking with molecular compounds will be far more energy efficient and environmentally sustainable than traditional techniques of cooking. This new way of thinking about food heralds a phase of culinary evolution on which the long-term survival of a growing human population depends. Hervé This clearly explains the properties of naturally occurring and synthesized compounds, dispels a host of misconceptions about the place of chemistry in cooking, and shows why note-by-note cooking is an obvious—and inevitable—extension of his earlier pioneering work in molecular gastronomy. An appendix contains a representative selection of recipes, vividly illustrated in color.
Biography & Autobiography

Cooking for the Common Good

Author: Larry Stettner

Publisher: North Atlantic Books

ISBN:

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 190

View: 693

"A history of The Common Good Soup Kitchen, a volunteer-run community cafâe and free soup program on Mount Desert Island, Maine"--Provided by publisher.
Poetry

Seven Controlled Vocabularies and Obituary 2004. The Joy of Cooking

Author: Tan Lin

Publisher: Wesleyan University Press

ISBN:

Category: Poetry

Page: 224

View: 243

Winner of the Association for Asian American Studies Book Award in Poetry (2012) How do we read a book as an object in a network, in a post-book, post-reading, meta-data environment? Seven Controlled Vocabularies models a generic book, a kind of field guide to the arts, wherein distinctions between various aesthetic disciplines are relaxed or dissolved and where avant-garde notions of difficulty are replaced with more relaxing and ambient formats such as yoga, disco, and meditation. Each of the book’s seven sections is devoted to a particular art form—film, photography, painting, the novel, architecture, music, and theory—and includes both text and found photographs as it explores the idea of what it means to be a book in an era when reading is disappearing into a diverse array of cultural products, media formats, and aesthetic practices. Seven Controlled Vocabularies will be available in a variety of print and electronic book delivery systems and formats.
Fiction

Picasso Blues

Author: Lee Lamothe

Publisher: Dundurn

ISBN:

Category: Fiction

Page: 408

View: 794

More than a whodunit detective story, Picasso Blues is a gripping tale of missed opportunities and hidden desires set amid rampant cynicism, fear, and deadly danger. In this sequel to Free Form Jazz, Ray Tate and Djuna Brown are reunited in a city being ripped apart by fear, paranoia, and racism. With the police force decimated by a SARS-like disease, Tate and Brown are assigned to a task force targeting a series of murders that seem to be racially motivated. As the city riots around them, can they fashion a future for themselves in their dreamland of bohemian Paris? Far more than a whodunit detective story, Picasso Blues is the gripping tale of a civil society that flirts with anarchy a society where the very defenders of order risk losing themselves to chaos.