Biography & Autobiography

Daughters Of Arabia

Author: Jean Sasson

Publisher: Random House

ISBN:

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 320

View: 597

Readers of Princess Sultana's extraordinary biography Princess were gripped by her powerful indictment of women's lives behind the veil within the royal family of Saudi Arabia. They were every bit as fascinated by the sequel, Daughters of Arabia. Here, the princess turns the spotlight on her two daughters, Maha and Amani, both teenagers. Surrounded by untold opulence and luxury from the day they were born, but stifled by the unbearably restrictive lifestyle imposed on them, they reacted in equally desperate ways. Their dramatic and shocking stories, together with many more which concern other members of Princess Sultana's huge family, are set against a rich backdrop of Saudi Arabian culture and social mores which she depicts with equal colour and authenticity. We learn, for example, of the fascinating ritual of the world-famous annual pilgrimage to Makkah as we accompany the princess and her family to this holiest of cities. Throughout, however, she never tires of her quest to expose the injustices which her society levels against women. In her courageous campaign to improve the lot of her own daughters of Arabia, Princess Sultana once more strikes a chord amongst all women who are lucky enough to have the freedom to speak out for themselves.
Social Science

Women in Saudi Arabia based on "Desert Royal" by Jean Sasson

Author: Khushmita Sandhu

Publisher: GRIN Verlag

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 27

View: 396

Seminar paper from the year 2014 in the subject Sociology - Culture, Technology, Peoples / Nations, grade: 10, , course: BA Dual Hons Social Sciences, language: English, abstract: The present term paper will try to compile the life and atrocities suffered by Saudi women, royals and commoners - the patriarchal society of Saudi Arabia, as well as the recent developments in Saudi Arabia with regard to women, both by taking references from the novels written by Jean Sasson as well as from the web sources. Princess - A trilogy, which is written by international author Jean Sasson, is a heart stirring novel about the life of a Saudi Princess Sultana, which is testimony to a woman of indomitable spirit and great courage. In this trilogy, Jean Sasson captured the flavours and reality of life in a country full of extremes and contradictions. Princess ‘Sultana’, a real Saudi princess closely related to king, lives those contradictions, with priceless jewels, many servants, unlimited funds at her disposal, but NO FREEDOM. Jean Sasson quotes princess ‘Sultana’ as, “A prisoner in a gilded cage with no vote, no control, and no value but as a mother of son, she is totally at mercy of the men of her life- her father, her brother, her husband’. In this novel, this bold Saudi princess gave an unvarnished look inside a closed society. ‘Sultana’ lifted the veil on the shocking world of forced marriages, sex slavery, honour killings and other outrages against women, both royal and common. By telling her story and miserable life of women in kingdom, ‘Sultana’ risked the wrath of the Saudi people and for this reason, she told her story anonymously through the bestselling author. This never forgetting real life story inspired me to write a term paper regarding society of Saudi Arabia, whose shimmers fade, when it comes to life of women
History

An Arabian Princess Between Two Worlds

Author: Emilie Said-Ruete

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 549

View: 503

Presents the reader with an intimate picture of life in Zanzibar between 1850-1865, and with an intelligent observer's reactions to life in Germany in the Bismarck period. Emily Ruete's writings describe her attempts to recover her Zanzibar inheritance and her homesickness.
Biography & Autobiography

Princess Sultana's Daughters

Author: Jean P. Sasson

Publisher: Doubleday Books

ISBN:

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 229

View: 715

Chronicles the fates of the two daughters of a Saudi Arabian princess--the elder, driven by isolation and fear into a lesbian relationship and mental breakdown, and the younger, who is seduced by fundamentalist fanaticism
Biography & Autobiography

Princess More Tears to Cry

Author: Jean Sasson

Publisher: Random House

ISBN:

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 336

View: 730

When Jean Sasson’s book Princess: Life Behind the Veil in Saudi Arabia was published, it became an immediate international bestseller. It sold to 43 countries and spent 13 weeks on The New York Times bestseller list. Now, in this long-awaited, compelling new book, Sasson and the Princess ‘Sultana’ return to tell the world what it means to be a Saudi woman today. Through advances in education and with access to work, Saudi women are breaking through the barriers; they are becoming doctors, social workers, business owners and are even managing to push at the boundaries of public life. Major steps forward have, undoubtedly, been made. But this is not the whole story. Sadly, despite changes in the law, all too often legal loopholes leave women exposed to terrible suppression, abuse and crimes of psychological and physical violence. For many, the struggle for basic human rights continues. This fascinating insight will include personal stories of triumph and heartbreak, as told to Princess 'Sultana', her eldest daughter, and author Jean Sasson. Each of these stories will offer the reader a glimpse into different aspects of Saudi society, including the lives of the Princess, her daughter and other members of the Al-Saud Royal family.
Biography & Autobiography

Princess

Author: Jean Sasson

Publisher: Random House

ISBN:

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 304

View: 511

In a land where Kings still rule, I am a Princess. You must know me only as Sultana, for I cannot reveal my true name for fear that harm will come to me and my family for what I am about to tell you. Think of a Saudi Arabian princess and what do you see? A woman glittering with jewels, living a life of unbelievable luxury. She has gold, palaces, swimming-pools, servants, designer dresses galore. But in reality she lives in a gilded cage. She has no freedom, no vote, no control over her own life, no value but as a bearer of sons. Hidden behind the veil, she is a prisoner, her jailers her father, her husband, her sons. 'Sultana' is a member of the Saudi royal family, closely related to the King. For the sake of her daughters, she decided that it was time for a woman in her position to speak out about the reality of life for women in her country, whatever their rank. She tells of her own life, from her turbulent childhood to her arranged marriage - a happy one, until her husband decided to take a second wife - and of the lives of her sisters, her friends and her servants. In contrast to the affection and easy camaraderie amongst the women, she relates a history of appalling oppression against them, everyday occurrences that in any other culture would be seen as shocking human rights violations: forced marriages, servants bullied into sex slavery, summary executions. Princess is a testimony to a woman of indomitable spirit and great courage. By speaking out, 'Sultana' risked bringing the wrath of the Saudi establishment upon her head and upon the heads of her children. For this reason, she told her story anonymously.
Biography & Autobiography

International Who's Who, 1983-84

Author: International Publications Service

Publisher: International Publications Service

ISBN:

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 1530

View: 718

Literary Criticism

Empire of Magic

Author: Geraldine Heng

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 536

View: 818

Empire of Magic offers a genesis and genealogy for medieval romance and the King Arthur legend through the history of Europe's encounters with the East in crusades, travel, missionizing, and empire formation. It also produces definitions of "race" and "nation" for the medieval period and posits that the Middle Ages and medieval fantasies of race and religion have recently returned. Drawing on feminist and gender theory, as well as cultural analyses of race, class, and colonialism, this provocative book revises our understanding of the beginnings of the nine hundred-year-old cultural genre we call romance, as well as the King Arthur legend. Geraldine Heng argues that romance arose in the twelfth century as a cultural response to the trauma and horror of taboo acts—in particular the cannibalism committed by crusaders on the bodies of Muslim enemies in Syria during the First Crusade. From such encounters with the East, Heng suggests, sprang the fantastical episodes featuring King Arthur in Geoffrey of Monmouth's chronicle The History of the Kings of England, a work where history and fantasy collide and merge, each into the other, inventing crucial new examples and models for romances to come. After locating the rise of romance and Arthurian legend in the contact zones of East and West, Heng demonstrates the adaptability of romance and its key role in the genesis of an English national identity. Discussing Jews, women, children, and sexuality in works like the romance of Richard Lionheart, stories of the saintly Constance, Arthurian chivralic literature, the legend of Prester John, and travel narratives, Heng shows how fantasy enabled audiences to work through issues of communal identity, race, color, class and alternative sexualities in socially sanctioned and safe modes of cultural discussion in which pleasure, not anxiety, was paramount. Romance also engaged with the threat of modernity in the late medieval period, as economic, social, and technological transformations occurred and awareness grew of a vastly enlarged world beyond Europe, one encompassing India, China, and Africa. Finally, Heng posits, romance locates England and Europe within an empire of magic and knowledge that surveys the world and makes it intelligible—usable—for the future. Empire of Magic is expansive in scope, spanning the eleventh to the fifteenth centuries, and detailed in coverage, examining various types of romance—historical, national, popular, chivalric, family, and travel romances, among others—to see how cultural fantasy responds to changing crises, pressures, and demands in a number of different ways. Boldly controversial, theoretically sophisticated, and historically rooted, Empire of Magic is a dramatic restaging of the role romance played in the culture of a period and world in ways that suggest how cultural fantasy still functions for us today.
Bibles

CSB Study Bible, Personal Size Edition, Mahogany LeatherTouch

Author: CSB Bibles by Holman

Publisher: B&H Publishing Group

ISBN:

Category: Bibles

Page: 2208

View: 400

Easy to read and carry, the CSB Study Bible, Personal Size offers the award-winning Holman study system, which includes over 15,000 study notes, tools, word studies, and articles from respected Bible scholars.