Literary Criticism

Emma

Author: Jane Austen

Publisher: W. W. Norton

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 462

View: 532

The Text of "Emma"; Contexts, Jane Austen her life and Fiction, Jane Austen: Her Art and Business, The Reception of Jane Austen 1815-1950; Criticism; Jane Austen A Chronology
Juvenile Nonfiction

Jane Austen's Emma

Author: Harold Bloom

Publisher: Infobase Publishing

ISBN:

Category: Juvenile Nonfiction

Page: 142

View: 448

Presents critical essays that discuss the language, characters, plot, and major themes of the author's novel of manners about courtship in the English countryside.
Literary Criticism

Power, Prose, and Purse

Author: Alison L. LaCroix

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 384

View: 405

"Power, Prose, and Purse is an edited collection of essays that draw connections between literature, economics and law. The essays discuss novels that explore the time period between the Industrial Revolution and the Great Depression and analyze the insights that novelists may offer to law and economics, while noting the tensions among these paradigms"--
Literary Criticism

Crisis-consciousness and the Novel

Author: Eugene Hollahan

Publisher: University of Delaware Press

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 269

View: 683

"This book examines the emergence of modern consciousness as consciousness develops historically in one cultural form: prose fiction narrative. The book represents a critical history of crisis, arguably the most characterizing single word in the modern world and a major figuration or trope. Eugene Hollahan has studied the history of this important word within the development of the English-language novel, from Samuel Richardson to Saul Bellow. After establishing a heuristic model for such a critical history, Hollahan tracks the word (characterized by George Eliot in Felix Holt, the Radical as a "great noun") through two-and-a-half centuries of narratives by major novelists, with contextualizing excursions into discourses in related fields such as autobiography, philosophy, theology, and social science." "Hollahan contextualizes his study of English-language narrative fiction by examining the writings of crisis-rhetoricians in the eighteenth century (Thomas Paine), nineteenth century (Thomas Carlyle, J. S. Mill, and J. H. Newman), and twentieth century (Karl Barth, Edmund Husserl, T. S. Kuhn, and Richard M. Nixon). Such varied and powerful crisis-rhetorics establish a matrix of language and ideas for the crisis-centered novels Hollahan surveys. These novels include major works by Samuel Richardson, Walter Scott, Jane Austen, George Eliot, George Meredith, George Gissing, George Moore, D. H. Lawrence, E. M. Forster, James Joyce, Lawrence Durrell, Robert Coover, and Saul Bellow." "Hollahan's description of the crisis-trope interfaces with various critical issues such as canonical inclusion, reader response, and deconstruction. On the whole, his book acknowledges current critical issues but endeavors to remain basically a critical history. It attempts to demonstrate that the crisis-riddled modern world and the crisis-conscious novel are analogous and coeval." "Crisis begins as Aristotle's term for logical plot structuring, becomes Longinus's term for emotional exacerbation, and eventually enters into a variety of critical and narrative formulations: Matthew Arnold's cultural centrality, Henry James's existential aestheticism, Lawrence's self-defining sexuality, Marshall Brown's revolutionary turning point, Paul de Man's error-ridden criticism, Floyd Merrell's cut into the primordial flux, Durrell's reborn self, and Bellow's analysis of hysterical escapism. Broadly speaking, Hollahan argues that any crisis-trope will enable or even necessitate a unique confluence of writerly and readerly skills." "In Louis Lambert, Balzac urged: "What a wonderful book one would write by narrating the life and adventures of a word." The story Hollahan narrates fulfills Balzac's expectations as it depicts writer after writer working out influential representations of human life in terms of crisis-consciousness centering upon George Eliot's "great noun" crisis. Historically, Hollahan demonstrates, such consciousness comes to define modern humanity."--BOOK JACKET.Title Summary field provided by Blackwell North America, Inc. All Rights Reserved
Literary Criticism

Pride and Prejudice (Fourth Edition) (Norton Critical Editions)

Author: Jane Austen

Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page:

View: 559

The Norton Critical Edition of Pride and Prejudice has been revised to reflect the most current scholarly approaches to Austen’s most widely read novel. The text is that of the 1813 first edition, accompanied by revised and expanded explanatory annotations. This Norton Critical Edition also includes: · Biographical portraits of Austen by members of her family and, new to the Fourth Edition, those by Jon Spence (Becoming Jane Austen) and Paula Byrne (The Real Jane Austen: A Life in Small Things). · Fourteen critical essays, eleven of them new to the Fourth Edition, reflecting the finest current scholarship. Contributors include Janet Todd, Andrew Elfenbein, Felicia Bonaparte, and Tiffany Potter, among others. · “Writers on Austen”—a new section of brief comments by Mark Twain, Virginia Woolf, Henry James, and others. · A Chronology and revised and expanded Selected Bibliography.
Abstracting

Form and Style

Author: William Giles Campbell

Publisher: Boston : Houghton Mifflin

ISBN:

Category: Abstracting

Page: 210

View: 334