History

The English court

from the Wars of the Roses to the Civil War

Author: David Starkey

Publisher: Addison-Wesley Longman Ltd

ISBN: N.A

Category: History

Page: 273

View: 6721

This pioneering work, the first serious analysis of the royal household between the middle ages and the eighteenth century, examines the internal workings of the court which was key to politics, and the personnel and organisation of the private royal apartments. It presents radical reinterpretation of the period as a whole, seeing the years from 1460 to 1640 as an essential unity - the age of personal court monarchy undivided by an imaginary 'revolution in government'.
History

The Wars of the Roses

Author: Alison Weir

Publisher: Random House Digital, Inc.

ISBN: 0345404335

Category: History

Page: 462

View: 8299

Chronicles the struggles of the Lancaster and York families to control the British monarchy, while offering profiles of such figures as Katherine of Valois, Elizabeth Wydville, and Margaret of Anjou
History

The English and Their History

Author: Robert Tombs

Publisher: Vintage

ISBN: 1101874775

Category: History

Page: 1040

View: 470

A New York Times 2016 Notable Book Robert Tombs’s momentous The English and Their History is both a startlingly fresh and a uniquely inclusive account of the people who have a claim to be the oldest nation in the world. The English first came into existence as an idea, before they had a common ruler and before the country they lived in even had a name. They have lasted as a recognizable entity ever since, and their defining national institutions can be traced back to the earliest years of their history. The English have come a long way from those first precarious days of invasion and conquest, with many spectacular changes of fortune. Their political, economic and cultural contacts have left traces for good and ill across the world. This book describes their history and its meanings from their beginnings in the monasteries of Northumbria and the wetlands of Wessex to the cosmopolitan energy of today’s England. Robert Tombs draws out important threads running through the story, including participatory government, language, law, religion, the land and the sea, and ever-changing relations with other peoples. Not the least of these connections are the ways the English have understood their own history, have argued about it, forgotten it and yet been shaped by it. These diverse and sometimes conflicting understandings are an inherent part of their identity. Rather to their surprise, as ties within the United Kingdom loosen, the English are suddenly embarking on a new chapter. The English and Their History, the first single-volume work on this scale for more than half a century, and which incorporates a wealth of recent scholarship, presents a challenging modern account of this immense and continuing story, bringing out the strength and resilience of English government, the deep patterns of division and also the persistent capacity to come together in the face of danger.
History

The Politics of Court Scandal in Early Modern England

News Culture and the Overbury Affair, 1603-1660

Author: Alastair Bellany

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9780521035439

Category: History

Page: 336

View: 2389

This is a detailed 2002 study of the political significance of the seventeenth century's most notorious and sensational court scandal - the Overbury murder. The book challenges earlier approaches to the history of court scandal, rejecting both the assumption that it inevitably undermined royal authority and the tendency to dismiss scandal as politically insignificant. The book adopts a multi-layered, interdisciplinary approach to the Overbury affair and its complex political meanings. It explores the factional politics that made and destroyed Overbury and his murderers, reconstructs the news culture through which information about the scandal circulated, analyses the creation and composition of the early Stuart 'public', and decodes the representations of the affair that were produced and consumed during 1615–16 and in subsequent decades. By situating the Overbury case both in short- and long-term political contexts, the book offers a reading of court scandal's place in the cultural origins of the English revolution.
Social Science

The Way We Are Now

Gay and Lesbian Lives in the 21st Century

Author: Ben Summerskill

Publisher: A&C Black

ISBN: 9780826487858

Category: Social Science

Page: 214

View: 4349

Provides an account of the way the world has transformed for millions of gay people within a generation. This work features lesbians and gay men discussing their lives and work.
History

The Reign of Edward II

New Perspectives

Author: Gwilym Dodd,Anthony Musson

Publisher: Boydell & Brewer

ISBN: 1903153190

Category: History

Page: 244

View: 5785

A new review of the most significant issues of Edward II's reign.
History

The Divorce of Henry VIII

The Untold Story from Inside the Vatican

Author: Catherine Fletcher

Publisher: St. Martin's Press

ISBN: 1137000589

Category: History

Page: 288

View: 1973

In 1533 the English monarch Henry VIII decided to divorce his wife of twenty years Catherine of Aragon in pursuit of a male heir to ensure the Tudor line. He was also head over heels in love with his wife's lady in waiting Anne Boleyn, the future mother of Elizabeth I. But getting his freedom involved a terrific web of intrigue through the enshrined halls of the Vatican that resulted in a religious schism and the formation of the Church of England. Henry's man in Rome was a wily Italian diplomat named Gregorio Casali who drew no limits on skullduggery including kidnapping, bribery and theft to make his king a free man. In this absorbing narrative, winner of the Rome Fellowship prize and University of Durham historian Catherine Fletcher draws on hundreds of previously-unknown Italian archive documents to tell the colorful tale from the inside story inside the Vatican.
History

Shaping the Nation

England 1360-1461

Author: Gerald Harriss,G. L. Harriss

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780199211197

Category: History

Page: 705

View: 5731

The Black Death, the Peasants' Revolt, the Hundred Years War, the War of the Roses... A succession of dramatic social and political events reshaped England in the period 1360 to 1461. In his lucid and penetrating account of this formative period, Gerald Harriss illuminates a richly varied society, as chronicled in The Canterbury Tales, and examines its developing sense of national identity.
Music

Music in Elizabethan Court Politics

Author: Katherine Butler

Publisher: Boydell & Brewer Ltd

ISBN: 1843839814

Category: Music

Page: 260

View: 7714

Music and musical entertainments are here shown to be used for different ends, by both monarch and courtiers.
History

Charles I and the People of England

Author: David Cressy

Publisher: OUP Oxford

ISBN: 0191018007

Category: History

Page: 416

View: 4634

The story of the reign of Charles I - through the lives of his people. Prize-winning historian David Cressy mines the widest range of archival and printed sources, including ballads, sermons, speeches, letters, diaries, petitions, proclamations, and the proceedings of secular and ecclesiastical courts, to explore the aspirations and expectations not only of the king and his followers, but also the unruly energies of many of his subjects, showing how royal authority was constituted, in peace and in war - and how it began to fall apart. A blend of micro-historical analysis and constitutional theory, parish politics and ecclesiology, military, cultural, and social history, Charles I and the People of England is the first major attempt to connect the political, constitutional, and religious history of this crucial period in English history with the experience and aspirations of the rest of the population. From the king and his ministers to the everyday dealings and opinions of parishioners, petitioners, and taxpayers, David Cressy re-creates the broadest possible panorama of early Stuart England, as it slipped from complacency to revolution.
History

The Reign of Mary Tudor

Politics, Government and Religion in England 1553-58

Author: D.M. Loades

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1317899350

Category: History

Page: 456

View: 932

`...by far the best overall history of the reign to date.'American Historical Review Within a chronological framework, David Loades adopts a thematic approach to the reign.
Drama

REED in Review

Essays in Celebration of the First Twenty-Five Years

Author: Audrey Douglas,Sally-Beth Maclean

Publisher: University of Toronto Press

ISBN: 1442658126

Category: Drama

Page: 264

View: 6856

In 2002, the Records of Early English Drama (REED) project marked its twenty-fifth anniversary with a special series of sessions at the International Medieval Congress at Leeds University. The REED sessions were designed to allow critical reflection on the past, present, and future of the project as it entered the twenty-first century. Thirteen essays amplifying the content of selected conference papers, and a fourteenth submitted at the editors' invitation, make up REED in Review . Contributors to the collection describe the conception and early years of REED, assess the project's impact on recent and current scholarship, and anticipate or propose stimulating new directions for future research. Individual essays address a wide variety of subjects, from the impact of REED research on Shakespeare textual editing, Robin Hood, patronage, and Elizabethan theatre studies, to a thought provoking redefinition of 'drama,' details of recent ground-breaking research in Scottish records, and the broadening possibilities for editorial and research relationships with information technology. The editors' introduction and a select bibliography, with commentary and a list of REED-related publications by editors and scholars from a variety of disciplines, make up the remainder of this landmark volume.
Literary Criticism

Shakespeare's English Kings

History, Chronicle, and Drama

Author: Peter Saccio

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780198028710

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 304

View: 8052

Far more than any professional historian, Shakespeare is responsible for whatever notions most of us possess about English medieval history. Anyone who appreciates the dramatic action of Shakespeare's history plays but is confused by much of the historical detail will welcome this guide to the Richards, Edwards, Henrys, Warwicks and Norfolks who ruled and fought across Shakespeare's page and stage. Not only theater-goers and students, but today's film-goers who want to enrich their understanding of film adaptations of plays such as Richard III and Henry V will find this revised edition of Shakespeare's English Kings to be an essential companion. Saccio's engaging narrative weaves together three threads: medieval English history according to the Tudor chroniclers who provided Shakespeare with his material, that history as understood by modern scholars, and the action of the plays themselves. Including a new preface, a revised further reading list, genealogical charts, an appendix of names and titles, and an index, the second edition of Shakespeare's English Kings offers excellent background reading for all of the ten history plays.
Biography & Autobiography

The Cradle King

The Life of James VI and I, the First Monarch of a United Great Britain

Author: Alan Stewart

Publisher: St. Martin's Press

ISBN: 1466866020

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 400

View: 8337

As the son of Mary Queen of Scots, born into her 'bloody nest,' James had the most precarious of childhoods. Even before his birth, his life was threatened: it was rumored that his father, Henry, had tried to make the pregnant Mary miscarry by forcing her to witness the assassination of her supposed lover, David Riccio. By the time James was a one-year-old, Henry was murdered, possibly with the connivance of his mother, Mary was in exile in England and he was King of Scotland. By the age of five, he had experienced three different regents as the ancient dynasties of Scotland battled for power and made him a virtual prisoner in Stirling Castle. In fact, James did not set foot outside the confines of Stirling until he was eleven, when he took control of the country. But even with power in his hands, he would never feel safe. For the rest of his life, he could be caught up in bitter struggles between the warring political and religious factions who fought for control over his mind and body. Biographer Alan Stewart reveals all of this and more, in The Cradle King: The Life of James VI and I, the First Monarch of a United Great Britain.
History

Elizabeth I and Her Circle

Author: Susan Doran

Publisher: OUP Oxford

ISBN: 0191033561

Category: History

Page: 416

View: 3495

This is the story of Elizabeth I's inner circle and the crucial human relationships which lay at the heart of her personal and political life. Using a wide range of original sources - including private letters, portraits, verse, drama, and state papers - Susan Doran provides a vivid and often dramatic account of political life in Elizabethan England and the queen at its centre, offering a deeper insight into Elizabeth's emotional and political conduct - and challenging many of the popular myths that have grown up around her. It is a story replete with fascinating questions. What was the true nature of Elizabeth's relationship with her father, Henry VIII, especially after his execution of her mother? How close was she to her half-brother Edward VI - and were relations with her half-sister Mary really as poisonous as is popularly assumed? And what of her relationship with her Stewart cousins, most famously with Mary Queen of Scots, executed on Elizabeth's orders in 1587, but also with Mary's son James VI of Scotland, later to succeed Elizabeth as her chosen successor? Elizabeth's relations with her family were crucial, but just as crucial were her relations with her courtiers and her councillors. Here again, the story raises a host of fascinating questions. Was the queen really sexually jealous of her maids of honour? Did physically attractive male favourties dominate her court? What does her long and intimate relationship with the Earl of Leicester reveal about her character, personality, and attitude to marriage? What can the fall of Essex tell us about Elizabeth's political management in the final years of her reign? And what was the true nature of her personal and political relationship with influential and long-serving councillors such as the Cecils and Sir Francis Walsingham? And how did courtiers and councillors deal with their demanding royal mistress?
Biography & Autobiography

Ben Jonson

A Life

Author: Ian Donaldson

Publisher: OUP Oxford

ISBN: 0191636797

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 560

View: 2458

Ben Jonson was the greatest of Shakespeare's contemporaries. In the century following his death he was seen by many as the finest of all English writers, living or dead. His fame rested not only on the numerous plays he had written for the theatre, but on his achievements over three decades as principal masque-writer to the early Stuart court, where he had worked in creative, and often stormy, collaboration with Inigo Jones. One of the most accomplished poets of the age, he had become - in fact if not in title - the first Poet Laureate in England. Jonson's life was full of drama. Serving in the Low Countries as a young man, he overcame a Spanish adversary in single combat in full view of both the armies. His early satirical play, The Isle of Dogs, landed him in prison, and brought all theatrical activity in London to a temporary — and very nearly to a permanent — standstill. He was 'almost at the gallows' for killing a fellow actor after a quarrel, and converted to Catholicism while awaiting execution. He supped with the Gunpowder conspirators on the eve of their planned coup at Westminster. After satirizing the Scots in Eastward Ho! he was imprisoned again; and throughout his career was repeatedly interrogated about plays and poems thought to contain seditious or slanderous material. In his middle years, twenty stone in weight, he walked to Scotland and back, seemingly partly to fulfil a wager, and partly to see the land of his forebears. He travelled in Europe as tutor to the mischievous son of Sir Walter Ralegh, who 'caused him to be drunken and dead drunk' and wheeled provocatively through the streets of Paris. During his later years he presided over a sociable club in the Apollo Room in Fleet Street, mixed with the most learned scholars of his day, and viewed with keen interest the political, religious, and scientific controversies of the day. Ian Donaldson's new biography draws on freshly discovered writings by and about Ben Jonson, and locates his work within the social and intellectual contexts of his time. Jonson emerges from this study as a more complex and volatile character than his own self-declarations (and much modern scholarship) would allow, and as a writer whose work strikingly foresees - and at times pre-emptively satirizes - the modern age.
History

Elizabeth's Bedfellows

An Intimate History of the Queen's Court

Author: Anna Whitelock

Publisher: A&C Black

ISBN: 1408833638

Category: History

Page: 480

View: 4534

Elizabeth I acceded to the throne in 1558, restoring the Protestant faith to England. At the heart of the new queen's court lay Elizabeth's bedchamber, closely guarded by the favoured women who helped her dress, looked after her jewels and shared her bed. Elizabeth's private life was of public, political concern. Her bedfellows were witnesses to the face and body beneath the make-up and elaborate clothes, as well as to rumoured illicit dalliances with such figures as Robert Dudley. Their presence was for security as well as propriety, as the kingdom was haunted by fears of assassination plots and other Catholic subterfuge. For such was the significance of the queen's body: it represented the very state itself. This riveting, revealing history of the politics of intimacy uncovers the feminized world of the Elizabethan court. Between the scandal and intrigue the women who attended the queen were the guardians of the truth about her health, chastity and fertility. Their stories offer extraordinary insight into the daily life of the Elizabethans, the fragility of royal favour and the price of disloyalty.
History

Sovereign Ladies

Sex, Sacrifice, and Power--The Six Reigning Queens of England

Author: Maureen Waller

Publisher: St. Martin's Press

ISBN: 1466858028

Category: History

Page: 576

View: 8659

Maureen Waller has written a fascinating narrative history---a brilliant combination of drama and biographical insight on the British monarchy---of the six women who have ruled England in their own names. In the last millennium there have been only six English female sovereigns: Mary I and Elizabeth I, Mary II and Anne, Victoria and Elizabeth II. With the exception of Mary I, they are among England's most successful monarchs. Without Mary II and Anne, the Glorious Revolution of 1688 might not have taken place. Elizabeth I and Victoria each gave their name to an age, presiding over long periods when Britain made significant progress in the growth of empire, prestige, and power. All of them have far-reaching legacies. Each faced personal sacrifices and emotional dilemmas in her pursuit of political power. How to overcome the problem of being a female ruler when the sex was considered inferior? Does a queen take a husband and, if so, how does she reconcile the reversal of the natural order, according to which the man should be the master? A queen's first royal duty is to provide an heir to the throne, but at what cost? In this richly compelling narrative of royalty, Maureen Waller delves into the intimate lives of England's queens regnant in delicious detail, assessing their achievements from a female perspective.
History

Lancastrians to Tudors

England 1450-1509

Author: Andrew Pickering

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 0521557461

Category: History

Page: 180

View: 6598

The Wars of the Roses and the struggle for the throne between the Houses of York and Lancaster dominate the turbulent history of the latter half of the fifteenth century. Andrew Pickering addresses the issues critical to the study of this period, and analyses the historical debates surounding the characters and events. The text also includes a document study section which offers readers the opportunity to examine a diverse set of written and visual sources. The result is a stimulating foundation text for all Advanced Subsidiary (AS) students, as well as for undergraduates needing an introduction to the period. 'Lancastrians to Tudors' is part of the Cambridge Perspectives in History series. It meets the requirements of the new OCR AS level specifications and is endorsed by OCR.
History

Aristocrats

Power, Grace, and Decadence: Britain's Great Ruling Classes from 1066 to the Present

Author: Lawrence James

Publisher: St. Martin's Press

ISBN: 9781429982788

Category: History

Page: 448

View: 3216

Aristocracy means "rule by the best." For nine hundred years, the British aristocracy considered itself ideally qualified to rule others, make laws, and guide the nation. Its virtues lay in its collective wisdom, its attachment to chivalric codes, and its sense of public duty. It evolved from a medieval warrior caste into a self-assured and sophisticated elite, which made itself the champion of popular liberty: It forced King John to sign the Magna Carta and later used its power and wealth to depose a succession of tyrannical kings from Richard II to James II. Britain's liberties and constitution were the result of aristocratic bloody-mindedness and courage. Aristocrats traces the history of this remarkable supremacy. It is a story of civil wars, conquests, intrigue, chicanery, and extremes of selflessness and greed. The aristocracy survived and, in the age of the great house and the Grand Tour, governed the first industrial nation while a knot of noblemen ruled its growing empire. Under pressure from below, this political power was slowly relinquished and then shared. Yet democratic Britain retained its aristocracy: Churchill, himself the grandson of a duke, presided over a wartime cabinet that contained six hereditary peers. Lawrence James illuminates the culture of this singular caste, shows how its infatuation with classical art has forged England's heritage, how its love of sport has shaped the nation's pastimes and values, and how its scandals have entertained its public. Impeccably researched, balanced, and brilliantly told, Aristocrats is an enthralling story of survival, a stunning history of wealth, power, and influence.