History

Days on the Family Farm

Author: Carrie A. Meyer

Publisher: U of Minnesota Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 264

View: 595

From the beginning of the twentieth century to World War II, farm wife May Lyford Davis kept a daily chronicle that today offers a window into a way of life that has all but disappeared. May and her husband Elmo lived through two decades of prosperity, the Great Depression, and two World Wars in their Midwestern farming community. Like many women of her time, Davis kept diaries that captured the everyday events of the family farm; she also kept meticulous farming accounts. In doing so, she left an extraordinary record that reflects not only her own experiences but also the history of early twentieth-century American agriculture. May and Elmo’s story, engagingly told by Carrie A. Meyer, showcases the large-scale evolution of agriculture from horses to automobiles and tractors, a surprisingly vibrant family and community life, and the business of commercial farming. Details such as what items were bought and sold, what was planted and harvested, the temperature and rainfall, births and deaths, and the direction of the wind are gathered to reveal a rich picture of a world shared by many small farmers. With sustainable and small-scale farming again on the rise in the United States, Days on the Family Farm resonates with both the profound and mundane aspects of rural life—past and present—in the Midwest.
Technology & Engineering

Willard Cochrane and the American Family Farm

Author: Richard A. Levins

Publisher: U of Nebraska Press

ISBN:

Category: Technology & Engineering

Page: 96

View: 395

Willard Cochrane watched the dramatic decline in American family farming from a vantage point few can claim. He became one of the country?s premier agricultural economists and carried the standard of liberalism for President Kennedy in the last serious fight to save the family farm. Then, for forty long years, he held to the principles while traditional agriculture faded into what he once called ?family farms in form but not in spirit.? This book is about the spirit of family farming: Thomas Jefferson?s dream of an agrarian democracy. What should we do in the face of globalization, high technology, and corporate control of our food supply? Willard Cochrane and the American Family Farm recounts how one man faced these issues and where he would wish us to go in the twenty-first century.
Business & Economics

The Political Economy of the Family Farm

Author: Sue Eleanor Headlee

Publisher: Greenwood Publishing Group

ISBN:

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 212

View: 236

In this work, Headlee argues that the family farm system--with its progressive nature and egalitarian class structure--played an important role in the transition to capitalism in the mid-nineteenth century United States. The family farm is examined in light of its economic and political implications, showing the relationship between the family farm and flegling industrial capitalism, a relationship that fostered the simultaneous industrial and agricultural revolutions. Headlee focuses on the adoption of the horse-drawn mechanical reaper (to harvest wheat) by family farmers in the 1850s.
Business & Economics

Cutting Hill

Author: Alan Pistorius

Publisher: Garrett County Press

ISBN:

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 279

View: 944

This is the true story of how you get your milk. And because this is the story of a family dairy farm in Vermont it is also the true story of how you get delicious, Grade A maple syrup. Author Alan Pistorius embedded with the Treadway family for a year, recording four seasons of milking, fixing, plowing and syrup making. Pistorius' careful observations make for a powerful meditation on farming, business and family.
History

Preserving the Family Farm

Author: Mary C. Neth

Publisher: Johns Hopkins University Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 368

View: 108

In Preserving the Family Farm Mary Neth focuses on these relations—of gender and community—to shed new light on the events of this crucial period.
Business & Economics

Class, Gender, and the American Family Farm in the 20th Century

Author: Elizabeth A. Ramey

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 148

View: 529

Integrating a focus on gender with Marx’s surplus-based notion of class, this book offers a one-of-a-kind analysis of family farms in the United States. The analysis shows how gender and class struggles developed during important moments in the history of these family farms shaped the trajectory of U.S. agricultural development. It also generates surprising insights about the family farm we thought we knew, as well as the food and agricultural system today. Elizabeth A. Ramey theorizes the family farm as a complex hybrid of mostly feudal and ancient class structures. This class-based definition of the family farm yields unique insights into three broad aspects of U.S. agricultural history. First, the analysis highlights the crucial, yet under-recognized role of farm women and children’s unpaid labor in subsidizing the family farm. Second, it allows for a new, class-based perspective on the roots of the twentieth century "miracle of productivity" in U.S. agriculture, and finally, the book demonstrates how the unique set of contradictions and circumstances facing family farmers during the early twentieth century, including class exploitation, was connected to concern for their ability to serve the needs of U.S. industrial capitalist development. The argument presented here highlights the significant costs associated with the intensification of exploitation in the transition to industrial agriculture in the U.S. When viewed through the lens of class, the hallowed family farm becomes an example of one of the most exploitative institutions in the U.S. economy. This book is suitable for students who study economic history, agricultural studies, and labor economics.
Fiction

Family Farm

Author: Fiona Palmer

Publisher: Penguin UK

ISBN:

Category: Fiction

Page: 416

View: 759

Isabelle Simpson longs to take over the family farm, but her ailing father won't give her a chance. The stand-off between them threatens to tear the family apart. Handsome neighbour Will Timmins holds the secret to building bridges between them, if Izzy can forgive him his past. Izzy is forced to make a tough decision sacrifice an exciting new romance or relinquish her lifelong dream? But then unexpected tragedy falls on the farm, and Izzy is thrown the greatest challenge of all. As she gathers with family and friends by the shade of the gum-tree tavern, confessions are made, long-held secrets are revealed and hearts are set free. 'A heartwarming romance about finding true love and following your dreams.' Femail.com.au
Social Science

Down and Out on the Family Farm

Author: Michael Johnston Grant

Publisher: U of Nebraska Press

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 232

View: 369

Focusing on the Great Plains states of Kansas, Nebraska, North Dakota, and South Dakota between 1929 and 1945, Down and Out on the Family Farm examines small familyøfarmers and the Rural Rehabilitation Program designed to help them. Historian Michael Johnston Grant reveals the tension between economic forces that favored large-scale agriculture and political pressure that championed family farms, and the results of that clash. ø The Great Depression and the drought of the 1930s lay bare the long-term economic instability of the rural Plains. The New Deal introduced the Rural Rehabilitation Program to assist lower- to middle-income farmers throughout the country. This program combined low-interest loans with managerial advice. However, these efforts were not enough to compete with the growing scale of agriculture or to counter the recurring drought of the era. Regional conservatism, environmental factors, and fiscal constraints limited the federal aid offered to thousands of families. ø Grant provides extensive primary source research from government documents, as well as letters, newspaper editorials, and case studies that focus on individual lives and fortunes. He examines who these families were and what their farms looked like, and he sheds light on the health problems and other personal concerns that interfered with the economic viability of many farms. The result is a provocative study that gives a human face to the hardships and triumphs of modern agriculture.