History

France and the Great War

Author: Leonard V. Smith,Stéphane Audoin-Rouzeau,Annette Becker

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9780521666312

Category: History

Page: 202

View: 2182

France and the Great War tells the story of how the French community embarked upon, sustained, and in some ways prevailed in the Great War. In this 2003 book, Leonard Smith and his co-authors synthesize many years of scholarship, examining the origins of the war from a diplomatic and military viewpoint, before shifting their emphasis to socio-cultural and economic history when discussing the civilian and military war culture. They look at the 'total' mobilization of the French national community, as well as the military and civilian crises of 1917, and the ambiguous victory of 1918. The book concludes by revealing how traces of the Great War can still be found in the political and cultural life of the French national community. This lively, accessible and engaging book will be of enormous value to students of the Great War.
History

Imperial Germany and the Great War, 1914–1918

Author: Roger Chickering

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1107037689

Category: History

Page: 286

View: 7781

This book represents the most comprehensive history of Germany during the First World War.
History

France and the Great War

Author: Leonard V. Smith,Stéphane Audoin-Rouzeau,Annette Becker

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9780521666312

Category: History

Page: 202

View: 6521

France and the Great War tells the story of how the French community embarked upon, sustained, and in some ways prevailed in the Great War. In this 2003 book, Leonard Smith and his co-authors synthesize many years of scholarship, examining the origins of the war from a diplomatic and military viewpoint, before shifting their emphasis to socio-cultural and economic history when discussing the civilian and military war culture. They look at the 'total' mobilization of the French national community, as well as the military and civilian crises of 1917, and the ambiguous victory of 1918. The book concludes by revealing how traces of the Great War can still be found in the political and cultural life of the French national community. This lively, accessible and engaging book will be of enormous value to students of the Great War.
History

Cities and the Making of Modern Europe, 1750-1914

Author: Andrew Lees,Lynn Hollen Lees

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 052183936X

Category: History

Page: 300

View: 1100

A survey of urbanization and the making of modern Europe from the mid-eighteenth century to the First World War.
History

A World Undone

The Story of the Great War 1914 to 1918

Author: G. J. Meyer

Publisher: Bantam

ISBN: 0553382403

Category: History

Page: 777

View: 6282

A narrative of the First World War examines the brutal conflict that transformed the face of Europe, paved the way for the Soviet Union and Hitler, and had long lasting repercussions.
History

Race and War in France

Colonial Subjects in the French Army, 1914–1918

Author: Richard S. Fogarty

Publisher: JHU Press

ISBN: 0801888247

Category: History

Page: 374

View: 4849

Reservoirs of men -- Race and the deployment of troupes indigènes -- Hierarchies of rank, hierarchies of race -- Race and language in the army -- Religion and the "problem" of Islam in the French army -- Race, sex, and imperial anxieties -- Between subjects and citizens
History

Mosquito Empires

Ecology and War in the Greater Caribbean, 1620–1914

Author: J. R. McNeill

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1139484508

Category: History

Page: N.A

View: 3687

This book explores the links among ecology, disease, and international politics in the context of the Greater Caribbean - the landscapes lying between Surinam and the Chesapeake - in the seventeenth through early twentieth centuries. Ecological changes made these landscapes especially suitable for the vector mosquitoes of yellow fever and malaria, and these diseases wrought systematic havoc among armies and would-be settlers. Because yellow fever confers immunity on survivors of the disease, and because malaria confers resistance, these diseases played partisan roles in the struggles for empire and revolution, attacking some populations more severely than others. In particular, yellow fever and malaria attacked newcomers to the region, which helped keep the Spanish Empire Spanish in the face of predatory rivals in the seventeenth and early eighteenth centuries. In the late eighteenth and through the nineteenth century, these diseases helped revolutions to succeed by decimating forces sent out from Europe to prevent them.
History

Enduring the Great War

Combat, Morale and Collapse in the German and British Armies, 1914-1918

Author: Alexander Watson

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 0521881013

Category: History

Page: 288

View: 5950

This book is an innovative comparative history of how German and British soldiers endured the horror of the First World War. Unlike existing literature, which emphasises the strength of societies or military institutions, this study argues that at the heart of armies' robustness lay natural human resilience. Drawing widely on contemporary letters and diaries of British and German soldiers, psychiatric reports and official documentation, and interpreting these sources with modern psychological research, this unique account provides fresh insights into the soldiers' fears, motivations and coping mechanisms. It explains why the British outlasted their opponents by examining and comparing the motives for fighting, the effectiveness with which armies and societies supported men and the combatants' morale throughout the conflict on both sides. Finally it challenges the consensus on the war's end, arguing that not a 'covert strike' but rather an 'ordered surrender' led by junior officers brought about Germany's defeat in 1918.
History

The Origins of the First World War

Author: William Mulligan

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 0521886333

Category: History

Page: 256

View: 7922

A new interpretation of the origins of World War I that synthesises recent scholarship and introduces the major historiographical and political debates surrounding the outbreak of the war. It examines key issues, providing a clear account of relations between the great powers, disintegrating empires, and the role of smaller states.
Literary Criticism

The Cambridge Companion to the Literature of the First World War

Author: Vincent Sherry

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1139826980

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: N.A

View: 3170

The Great War of 1914–1918 marks a turning point in modern history and culture. This Companion offers critical overviews of the major literary genres and social contexts that define the study of the literatures produced by the First World War. The volume comprises original essays by distinguished scholars of international reputation, who examine the impact of the war on various national literatures, principally Great Britain, Germany, France and the United States, before addressing the way the war affected Modernism, the European avant-garde, film, women's writing, memoirs, and of course the war poets. It concludes by addressing the legacy of the war for twentieth-century literature. The Companion offers readers a chronology of key events and publication dates covering the years leading up to and including the war, and ends with a current bibliography of further reading organised by chapter topics.
History

Europe's Last Summer

Who Started the Great War in 1914?

Author: David Fromkin

Publisher: Vintage

ISBN: 0307425789

Category: History

Page: 384

View: 7963

When war broke out in Europe in 1914, it surprised a European population enjoying the most beautiful summer in memory. For nearly a century since, historians have debated the causes of the war. Some have cited the assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand; others have concluded it was unavoidable. In Europe’s Last Summer, David Fromkin provides a different answer: hostilities were commenced deliberately. In a riveting re-creation of the run-up to war, Fromkin shows how German generals, seeing war as inevitable, manipulated events to precipitate a conflict waged on their own terms. Moving deftly between diplomats, generals, and rulers across Europe, he makes the complex diplomatic negotiations accessible and immediate. Examining the actions of individuals amid larger historical forces, this is a gripping historical narrative and a dramatic reassessment of a key moment in the twentieth-century. From the Trade Paperback edition.
History

Authority, Identity and the Social History of the Great War

Author: Frans Coetzee,Marilyn Shevin Coetzee

Publisher: Berghahn Books

ISBN: 9781571810175

Category: History

Page: 362

View: 6799

The unprecedented scope and intensity of the First World War has prompted an enormous body of retrospective scholarship. However, efforts to provide a coherent synthesis about the war's impact and significance have remained circumscribed, tending to focus either on the operational outlines of military strategy and tactics or on the cultural legacy of the conflict as transmitted bythe war's most articulate observers. This volume departs from traditional accounts on several scores: by exploring issues barely touched upon in previous works, by deviating from the widespread tendency to treat the experiences of front and homefront isolation, and by employing a thematic treatment that, by considering the construction of authority and identity between 1914 and 1918, illuminates the fundamental question of how individuals, whether in uniform or not, endured the war's intrusion into so many aspects of their public and private lives.
History

Paths of Glory

The French Army, 1914-18

Author: Anthony Clayton

Publisher: Weidenfeld & Nicolson

ISBN: 1474603335

Category: History

Page: 240

View: 2537

Anthony Clayton is an acknowledged expert on the French military, and his book is a major contribution to the study and understanding of the First World War. He reveals why and how the French army fought as it did. He profiles its senior commanders - Joffre, Petain, Nivelle and Foch - and analyses its major campaigns both on the Western Front and in the Near East and Africa. PATHS OF GLORY also considers in detail the officers, how they kept their trenches and how men from very different areas of France fought and died together. He scrutinises the make-up and performance of France's large colonial armies, and investigates the mutinies of 1917. Ultimately, he reveals how the traumatic French experience of the 1914-18 war indelibly shaped a nation.
History

Warfare in African History

Author: Richard J. Reid

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 0521195101

Category: History

Page: 188

View: 1464

This book examines the role of war in shaping the African state, society, and economy by tracing shifts in the culture and practice of war.
History

Sites of Memory, Sites of Mourning

The Great War in European Cultural History

Author: Jay Winter

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 113995296X

Category: History

Page: N.A

View: 7935

Jay Winter's powerful study of the 'collective remembrance' of the Great War offers a major reassessment of one of the critical episodes in the cultural history of the twentieth century. Dr Winter looks anew at the culture of commemoration and the ways in which communities endeavoured to find collective solace after 1918. Taking issue with the prevailing 'modernist' interpretation of the European reaction to the appalling events of 1914–18, Dr Winter instead argues that what characterised that reaction was, rather, the attempt to interpret the Great War within traditional frames of reference. Tensions arose inevitably. Sites of Memory, Sites of Mourning is a profound and moving book of seminal importance for the attempt to understand the course of European history during the first half of the twentieth century.
History

Capital Cities at War

Paris, London, Berlin 1914-1919

Author: Jay Winter,Jean-Louis Robert

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9780521668149

Category: History

Page: 622

View: 3790

This ambitious volume marks a huge step in our understanding of the social history of the Great War. Jay Winter and Jean-Louis Robert have gathered a group of scholars of London, Paris and Berlin, who collectively have drawn a coherent and original study of cities at war. The contributors explore notions of well-being in wartime cities - relating to the economy and the question of whether the state of the capitals contributed to victory or defeat. Expert contributors in fields stretching from history, demography, anthropology, economics, and sociology to the history of medicine, bring an interdisciplinary approach to the book, as well as representing the best of recent research in their own fields. Capital Cities at War, one of the few truly comparative works on the Great War, will transform studies of the conflict, and is likely to become a paradigm for research on other wars.
History

A History of the Great War

1914-1918

Author: C.R.M.F. Cruttwell

Publisher: Chicago Review Press

ISBN: 0897336607

Category: History

Page: 688

View: 5806

This vivid, detailed history of World War I presents the general reader with an accurate and readable account of the campaigns and battles, along with brilliant portraits of the leaders and generals of all countries involved. Scrupulously fair, praising and blaming friend and enemy as circumstances demand, this has become established as the classic account of the first world-wide war.
History

Years of Plenty, Years of Want

France and the Legacy of the Great War

Author: Benjamin F. Martin

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9780875804682

Category: History

Page: 239

View: 7398

The Great War that engulfed Europe between 1914 and 1918 was a catastrophe for France. French soil was the site of most of the fighting on the Western Front. French dead were more than 1.3 million, the permanently disabled another 1.1 million, overwhelmingly men in their twenties and thirties. The decade and a half before the war had been years of plenty, a time of increasing prosperity and confidence remembered as the Belle Epoque or the good old days. The two decades that followed its end were years of want, loss, misery, and fear. In 1914, France went to war convinced of victory. In 1939, France went to war dreading defeat.To explain the burden of winning the Great War and embracing the collapse that followed, Benjamin Martin examines the national mood and daily life of France in July 1914 and August 1939, the months that preceded the two world wars. He presents two titans: Georges Clemenceau, defiant and steadfast, who rallied a dejected nation in 1918, and Edouard Daladier, hesitant and irresolute, who espoused appeasement in 1938 though comprehending its implications. He explores novels by a constellation of celebrated French writers who treated the Great War and its social impact, from Colette to Irène Némirovsky, from François Mauriac to Antoine de Saint-Exupéry. And he devotes special attention to Roger Martin du Gard, the 1937 Nobel Laureate, whose roman-fleuve The Thibaults is an unrivaled depiction of social unraveling and disillusionment.For many in France, the legacy of the Great War was the vow to avoid any future war no matter what the cost. They cowered behind the Maginot Line, the fortifications along the eastern border designed to halt any future German invasion. Others knew that cost would be too great and defended the “Descartes Line”: liberty and truth, the declared values of French civilization. In his distinctive and vividly compelling prose, Martin recounts this struggle for the soul of France.
History

The Fall of the Ottomans

The Great War in the Middle East

Author: Eugene Rogan

Publisher: Basic Books

ISBN: 0465056695

Category: History

Page: 512

View: 7854

In 1914 the Ottoman Empire was depleted of men and resources after years of war against Balkan nationalist and Italian forces. But in the aftermath of the assassination in Sarajevo, the powers of Europe were sliding inexorably toward war, and not even the Middle East could escape the vast and enduring consequences of one of the most destructive conflicts in human history. The Great War spelled the end of the Ottomans, unleashing powerful forces that would forever change the face of the Middle East. In The Fall of the Ottomans, award-winning historian Eugene Rogan brings the First World War and its immediate aftermath in the Middle East to vivid life, uncovering the often ignored story of the region's crucial role in the conflict. Bolstered by German money, arms, and military advisors, the Ottomans took on the Russian, British, and French forces, and tried to provoke Jihad against the Allies in their Muslim colonies. Unlike the static killing fields of the Western Front, the war in the Middle East was fast-moving and unpredictable, with the Turks inflicting decisive defeats on the Entente in Gallipoli, Mesopotamia, and Gaza before the tide of battle turned in the Allies' favor. The great cities of Baghdad, Jerusalem, and, finally, Damascus fell to invading armies before the Ottomans agreed to an armistice in 1918. The postwar settlement led to the partition of Ottoman lands between the victorious powers, and laid the groundwork for the ongoing conflicts that continue to plague the modern Arab world. A sweeping narrative of battles and political intrigue from Gallipoli to Arabia, The Fall of the Ottomans is essential reading for anyone seeking to understand the Great War and the making of the modern Middle East.