Law

Freedom for the Thought That We Hate

Author: Anthony Lewis

Publisher: Hachette UK

ISBN:

Category: Law

Page: 240

View: 912

From one of the most influential journalists of the last half century, an essential explanation and defense of a foundational American idea: free speech More than any other people on earth, we Americans are free to say and write what we think. The press can air the secrets of government, the corporate boardroom, or the bedroom with little fear of punishment or penalty. This extraordinary freedom results not from America's culture of tolerance, but from fourteen words in the constitution: the free expression clauses of the First Amendment. In Freedom for the Thought That We Hate, two-time Pulitzer Prize-winner Anthony Lewis describes how our free-speech rights were created in five distinct areas: political speech, artistic expression, libel, commercial speech, and unusual forms of expression such as T-shirts and campaign spending. It is a story of hard choices, heroic judges, and the fascinating and eccentric defendants who forced the legal system to come face to face with one of America's great founding ideas.
Political Science

Summary: Freedom for the Thought That We Hate

Author: BusinessNews Publishing

Publisher: Primento

ISBN:

Category: Political Science

Page: 44

View: 616

The must-read summary of Anthony Lewis's book: “Freedom for the Thought That We Hate: A Biography of the First Amendment”. This complete summary of "Freedom for the Thought That We Hate" by Anthony Lewis, journalist and twice winner of the Pulitzer Prize, presents his account of the history of the First Amendment and the courts' interpretations of it over time. It recounts the hard choices made by the legal system, and the plight of citizens to protect their First Amendment rights. Added-value of this summary: • Save time • Understand the First Amendment and its implications • Expand your knowledge of American politics and society To learn more, read "Freedom for the Thought That We Hate" and discover the history of the First Amendment and its relevance today.
Law

Must We Defend Nazis?

Author: Richard Delgado

Publisher: NYU Press

ISBN:

Category: Law

Page: 238

View: 665

In Must We Defend Nazis?, Richard Delgado and Jean Stefancic set out to liberate speech from its current straight-jacket. Over the past hundred years, almost all of American law has matured from the mechanical jurisprudence approach--which held that cases could be solved on the basis of legal rules and logic alone--to that of legal realism--which maintains that legal reasoning must also take into account social policy, common sense, and experience. But in the area of free speech, the authors argue, such archaic formulas as the prohibition against content regulation, the maxim that the cure for bad speech is more speech, and the speech/act distinction continue to reign, creating a system which fails to take account of the harms speech can cause to disempowered, marginalized people. Focusing on the issues of hate-speech and pornography, this volume examines the efforts of reformers to oblige society and law to take account of such harms. It contends that the values of free expression and equal dignity stand in reciprocal relation. Speech in any sort of meaningful sense requires equal dignity, equal access, and equal respect on the parts of all of the speakers in a dialogue; free speech, in other words, presupposes equality. The authors argue for a system of free speech which takes into account nuance, context-sensitivity, and competing values such as human dignity and equal protection of the law.
Education

The Lost Soul of Higher Education

Author: Ellen Schrecker

Publisher: The New Press

ISBN:

Category: Education

Page: 304

View: 743

Schrecker, the leading historian of the McCarthy-era witch hunts, examines both the key fronts in the present battles over higher ed, and their historical parallels in previous eras – offering a deeply-researched chronicle of the challenges to academic freedom, set against the rapidly changing structure of the academy itself. The Lost Soul of Higher Education tells the interwoven stories of successive, well-funded ideological assaults on academic freedom by outside pressure groups aimed at undermining the legitimacy of scholarly study, viewed alongside decades of eroding higher education budgets -- a trend that has sharply accelerated during the recent economic downturn.
History

The Great Dissent

Author: Thomas Healy

Publisher: Metropolitan Books

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 336

View: 170

A gripping intellectual history reveals how Oliver Wendell Holmes became a free-speech advocate and established the modern understanding of the First Amendment No right seems more fundamental to American public life than freedom of speech. Yet well into the twentieth century, that freedom was still an unfulfilled promise, with Americans regularly imprisoned merely for speaking out against government policies. Indeed, free speech as we know it comes less from the First Constitutional Amendment than from a most unexpected source: Supreme Court justice Oliver Wendell Holmes. A lifelong skeptic, he disdained all individual rights, including the right to express one's political views. But in 1919, it was Holmes who wrote a dissenting opinion that would become the canonical affirmation of free speech in the United States. Why did Holmes change his mind? That question has puzzled historians for almost a century. Now, with the aid of newly discovered letters and confidential memos, law professor Thomas Healy reconstructs in vivid detail Holmes's journey from free-speech opponent to First Amendment hero. It is the story of a remarkable behind-the-scenes campaign by a group of progressives to bring a legal icon around to their way of thinking—and a deeply touching human narrative of an old man saved from loneliness and despair by a few unlikely young friends. Beautifully written and exhaustively researched, The Great Dissent is intellectual history at its best, revealing how free debate can alter the life of a man and the legal landscape of an entire nation. A Kirkus Reviews Best Nonfiction Book of 2013
Social Science

McQuail's Reader in Mass Communication Theory

Author: Denis McQuail

Publisher: SAGE

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 427

View: 578

McQuail's Reader in Mass Communication Theory provides an invaluable resource of key statements drawn from communication studies, media sociology, and cultural studies, and includes an overview essay and section introductions which place the readings in their theoretical and methodological context. Designed as a companion to McQuail's Mass Communication Theory, it can also function independently of that text. provides an invaluable resource of key statements drawn from communication studies, media sociology, and cultural studies, and includes an overview essay and section introductions which place the readings in their theoretical and methodological context. Designed as a companion to , it can also function independently of that text.
Education

The School Uniform Movement and what it Tells Us about American Education

Author: David L. Brunsma

Publisher: R&L Education

ISBN:

Category: Education

Page: 263

View: 476

This book represents the most thorough exposition on our present understanding of the impetuses, debates, legalities, and effectiveness of school uniform policies that have rapidly entered the discourse of school reform in the United States. In it, David Brunsma provides an antidote to the ungrounded, anecdotal components that define the contemporary conversation regarding policies of standardized dress in American K-12 districts and schools.
Political Science

Figures of Speech

Author: William Turner

Publisher: Berrett-Koehler Publishers

ISBN:

Category: Political Science

Page: 232

View: 173

Recounting controversial First Amendment cases from the Red Scare era to Citizens United, William Bennett Turner—a Berkeley law professor who has argued three cases before the Supreme Court—shows how we’ve arrived at our contemporary understanding of free speech. His strange cast of heroes and villains, some drawn from cases he has litigated, includes Communists, Jehovah’s Witnesses, Ku Klux Klansmen, the world’s leading pornographer, prison wardens, dogged reporters, federal judges, a computer whiz, and a countercultural comedian. This is a fascinating look at how the scope of our First Amendment freedoms has evolved and the colorful characters behind some of the most important legal decisions of modern times. “Turner tells fascinating stories of unlikely heroes and explains difficult legal issues clearly and concisely, educating and entertaining at the same time.”—Elizabeth Farnsworth, The PBS News Hour
History

Censoring Racial Ridicule

Author: M. Alison Kibler

Publisher: UNC Press Books

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 328

View: 660

A drunken Irish maid slips and falls. A greedy Jewish pawnbroker lures his female employee into prostitution. An African American man leers at a white woman. These and other, similar images appeared widely on stages and screens across America during the early twentieth century. In this provocative study, M. Alison Kibler uncovers, for the first time, powerful and concurrent campaigns by Irish, Jewish and African Americans against racial ridicule in popular culture at the turn of the twentieth century. Censoring Racial Ridicule explores how Irish, Jewish, and African American groups of the era resisted harmful representations in popular culture by lobbying behind the scenes, boycotting particular acts, and staging theater riots. Kibler demonstrates that these groups' tactics evolved and diverged over time, with some continuing to pursue street protest while others sought redress through new censorship laws. Exploring the relationship between free expression, democracy, and equality in America, Kibler shows that the Irish, Jewish, and African American campaigns against racial ridicule are at the roots of contemporary debates over hate speech.