History

From Catholic To Protestant

Religion and the People in Tudor and Stuart England

Author: Doreen Margaret Rosman

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1135365423

Category: History

Page: 112

View: 2047

First published in 1996. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.
History

From Catholic To Protestant

Religion and the People in Tudor and Stuart England

Author: Doreen Margaret Rosman

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1135365415

Category: History

Page: 116

View: 8590

First published in 1996. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.
History

From Catholic To Protestant

Religion and the People in Tudor and Stuart England

Author: Doreen Margaret Rosman

Publisher: Psychology Press

ISBN: 185728433X

Category: History

Page: 112

View: 1643

This work, aimed at students unfamiliar with religious ideas and terminology, attempts to convey the centrality of religion to people's lives in early modern England, and to understand why people were prepared to die and kill for their faith.
History

Early Modern Kent, 1540-1640

Author: Michael Zell

Publisher: Boydell & Brewer

ISBN: 9780851155852

Category: History

Page: 340

View: 1703

Aspects of Kent history from Henry VIII to Charles I: politics, economics, agriculture, society, religion - and witchcraft.
History

Travesties and Transgressions in Tudor and Stuart England

Tales of Discord and Dissension

Author: David Cressy

Publisher: Oxford University Press on Demand

ISBN: 9780198207818

Category: History

Page: 351

View: 2214

In Travesties and Transgressions, David Cressy examines how the orderly, Protestant, and hierarchical society of post-Reformation England coped with the cultural challenges posed by beliefs and events outside the social norm. He uses a series of linked stories and close readings of local texts and narratives to investigate unorthodox happenings such as bestiality and monstrous births, seduction and abortion, excommunication and irregular burial, nakedness and cross-dressing. Each story, and the reaction it generated, exposes the strains and stresses of its local time and circumstances. The reigns of Elizabeth, James, and Charles I were witness to endless religious disputes, tussles for power within the aristocracy, and arguments galore about the behaviour and beliefs of common people. Questions raised by 'unnatural' episodes were debated throughout society at local and national levels, and engaged the attention of the magistrates, the bishops, the crown, and the court. Theresolution of such questions was not taken lightly in a world in which God and the devil still fought for people's souls.
Religion

Unity in Diversity

English Puritans and the Puritan Reformation, 1603-1689

Author: Randall J. Pederson

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN: 9004278516

Category: Religion

Page: 396

View: 8647

In Unity in Diversity, Randall J. Pederson critiques current trends in the study of Puritanism, and proposes a different path for defining Puritanism, centered on unitas and diversitas, by looking at John Downame, Francis Rous, and Tobias Crisp.
History

English Reformations

Religion, Politics, and Society Under the Tudors

Author: Christopher Haigh

Publisher: Oxford University Press on Demand

ISBN: 0198221622

Category: History

Page: 367

View: 8625

English Reformations takes a refreshing new approach to the study of the Reformation in England. Christopher Haigh's lively and readable study disproves any facile assumption that the triumph of Protestantism was inevitable, and goes beyond the surface of official political policy to explore the religious views and practices of ordinary English people. With the benefit of hindsight, other historians have traced the course of the Reformation as a series of events inescapably culminating in the creation of the English Protestant establishment. Haigh sets out to recreate the sixteenth century as a time of excitement and insecurity, with each new policy or ruler causing the reversal of earlier religious changes. This is a scholarly and stimulating book, which challenges traditional ideas about the Reformation and offers a powerful and convincing alternative analysis.
Literary Criticism

The End of Satisfaction

Drama and Repentance in the Age of Shakespeare

Author: Heather Hirschfeld

Publisher: Cornell University Press

ISBN: 0801470625

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 240

View: 1007

In The End of Satisfaction, Heather Hirschfeld recovers the historical specificity and the conceptual vigor of the term “satisfaction” during the sixteenth and early seventeenth centuries. Focusing on the term’s significance as an organizing principle of Christian repentance, she examines the ways in which Shakespeare and his contemporaries dramatized the consequences of its re- or de-valuation in the process of Reformation doctrinal change. The Protestant theology of repentance, Hirschfeld suggests, underwrote a variety of theatrical plots “to set things right” in a world shorn of the prospect of “making enough” (satisfacere). Hirschfeld’s semantic history traces today’s use of “satisfaction”—as an unexamined measure of inward gratification rather than a finely nuanced standard of relational exchange—to the pressures on legal, economic, and marital discourses wrought by the Protestant rejection of the Catholic sacrament of penance (contrition, confession, satisfaction) and represented imaginatively on the stage. In so doing, it offers fresh readings of the penitential economies of canonical plays including Dr. Faustus, The Revenger’s Tragedy, The Merchant of Venice, and Othello; considers the doctrinal and generic importance of lesser-known plays including Enough Is as Good as a Feast and Love’s Pilgrimage; and opens new avenues into the study of literature and repentance in early modern England.
History

Conversion, Politics and Religion in England, 1580-1625

Author: Michael C. Questier

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9780521442145

Category: History

Page: 240

View: 1461

A study of conversion and its implications during the English Reformation.
Philosophy

Childhood, Youth, and Religious Dissent in Post-Reformation England

Author: L. Underwood

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 1137364505

Category: Philosophy

Page: 275

View: 1066

This book explores the role of children and young people within early modern England's Catholic minority. It examines Catholic attempts to capture the next generation, Protestant reactions to these initiatives, and the social, legal and political contexts in which young people formed, maintained and attempted to explain their religious identity.

The Church Standard

Author: N.A

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category:

Page: N.A

View: 620

History

Protestant Empire

Religion and the Making of the British Atlantic World

Author: Carla Gardina Pestana

Publisher: University of Pennsylvania Press

ISBN: 0812203496

Category: History

Page: 312

View: 795

The imperial expansion of Europe across the globe was one of the most significant events to shape the modern world. Among the many effects of this cataclysmic movement of people and institutions was the intermixture of cultures in the colonies that Europeans created. Protestant Empire is the first comprehensive survey of the dramatic clash of peoples and beliefs that emerged in the diverse religious world of the British Atlantic, including England, Scotland, Ireland, parts of North and South America, the Caribbean, and Africa. Beginning with the role religion played in the lives of believers in West Africa, eastern North America, and western Europe around 1500, Carla Gardina Pestana shows how the Protestant Reformation helped to fuel colonial expansion as bitter rivalries prompted a fierce competition for souls. The English—who were latecomers to the contest for colonies in the Atlantic—joined the competition well armed with a newly formulated and heartfelt anti-Catholicism. Despite officially promoting religious homogeneity, the English found it impossible to prevent the conflicts in their homeland from infecting their new colonies. Diversity came early and grew inexorably, as English, Scottish, and Irish Catholics and Protestants confronted one another as well as Native Americans, West Africans, and an increasing variety of other Europeans. Pestana tells an original and compelling story of their interactions as they clung to their old faiths, learned of unfamiliar religions, and forged new ones. In an account that ranges widely through the Atlantic basin and across centuries, this book reveals the creation of a complicated, contested, and closely intertwined world of believers of many traditions.
History

Birth, Marriage, and Death : Ritual, Religion, and the Life-Cycle in Tudor and Stuart England

Ritual, Religion, and the Life-Cycle in Tudor and Stuart England

Author: David Cressy

Publisher: OUP Oxford

ISBN: 9780191570766

Category: History

Page: 658

View: 9847

From childbirth and baptism through to courtship, weddings, and funerals, every stage in the life-cycle of Tudor and Stuart England was accompanied by ritual. Even under the protestantism of the reformed Church, the spiritual and social dramas of birth, marriage, and death were graced with elaborate ceremony. Powerful and controversial protocols were in operation, shaped and altered by the influences of the Reformation, the Revolution, and the Restoration. Each of the major rituals was potentially an arena for argument, ambiguity, and dissent. Ideally, as classic rites of passage, these ceremonies worked to bring people together. But they also set up traps into which people could stumble, and tests which not everybody could pass. In practice, ritual performance revealed frictions and fractures that everyday local discourse attempted to hide or to heal. Using fascinating first-hand evidence, David Cressy shows how the making and remaking of ritual formed part of a continuing debate, sometimes strained and occasionally acrimonious, which exposed the raw nerves of society in the midst of great historical events. In doing so, he vividly brings to life the common experiences of living and dying in Tudor and Stuart England.
History

Reformation to Revolution

Politics and Religion in Early Modern England

Author: Margo Todd

Publisher: Psychology Press

ISBN: 9780415096928

Category: History

Page: 279

View: 2437

Few periods of English history have been so subject to `revisionism' as the Tudors and Stuarts. This volume offers a full introduction to the complex historiographical debates currently raging about politics and religion in early modern England. It * draws together thirteen articles culled from familiar and also less accessible sources * embraces revisionist and counter-revisionist viewpoints * combines controversial works on both politics and religion * covers Tudor as well as early Stuart England * includes helpful glossary, explanatory headnotes and suggestions for further reading. These carefully edited and introduced essays draw on the new evidence of newsletters and ballads and ritual, as well as the more traditional sources, to offer a new and broader understanding of this transformative era of English history.
History

Popular Politics and the English Reformation

Author: Ethan H. Shagan

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9780521525558

Category: History

Page: 341

View: 3481

A study of popular responses to the English Reformation after Henry VIII's break from Rome.
Religion

Windows into Men's Souls

Religious Nonconformity in Tudor and Early Stuart England

Author: Kenneth L. Campbell

Publisher: Lexington Books

ISBN: 0739168207

Category: Religion

Page: 244

View: 2350

Windows into Men’s Souls focuses on the ways in which the concept of religious nonconformity was inherent in the English Reformation. The book’s uniqueness lies in its blending of different historiographical traditions dealing with Puritans, Catholics, and Separatists while melding them into a coherent and interpretive analysis of the phenomenon of religious nonconformity as a whole and the religious and intellectual impulses behind it.
History

Invisible Worlds

Death, Religion And The Supernatural In England, 1500-1700

Author: Peter Marshall

Publisher: SPCK

ISBN: 0281075239

Category: History

Page: 256

View: 5992

How did traditional beliefs about the supernatural change as a result of the Reformation, and what were the intellectual and cultural consequences? Following a masterly interpretative introduction, Peter Marshall traces the effects of the Reformers’ assaults on established beliefs about the afterlife. He shows how debates about purgatory and the nature of hellfire acted as unwitting agents of modernization. He then turns to popular beliefs about angels, ghosts and fairies, and considers how these were reimagined and reappropriated when cut from their medieval moorings. Contents PART 1: HEAVEN, HELL AND PURGATORY: HUMANS IN THE SPIRIT WORLD 1. After Purgatory: Death and Remembrance in the Reformation World 2. ‘The Map of God’s Word’: Geographies of the Afterlife in Tudor and Early Stuart England’ 3. Judgment and Repentance in Tudor Manchester: The Celestial Journey of Ellis Hall 4. The Reformation of Hell? Protestant and Catholic Infernalisms, c. 1560-1640 5. The Company of Heaven: Identity and Sociability in the English Protestant Afterlife PART 2: ANGELS, GHOSTS AND FAIRIES: SPIRITS IN THE HUMAN WORLD 6. Angels Around the Deathbed: Variations on a Theme in the English Art of Dying 7. The Guardian Angel in Protestant England 8. Deceptive Appearances: Ghosts and Reformers in Elizabethan and Jacobean England 9. Piety and Poisoning in Restoration Plymouth 10. Transformations of the Ghost Story in Post-Reformation England 11. Ann Jeffries and the Fairies: Folk Belief and the War on Scepticism
Literary Criticism

The Tragedy of Mariam, the Fair Queen of Jewry

with The Lady Falkland: Her Life, by One of Her Daughters

Author: Elizabeth Cary

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 9780520912984

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 344

View: 1720

The Tragedy of Mariam (1613) is the first original play by a woman to be published in England, and its author is the first English woman writer to be memorialized in a biography, which is included with this edition of the play. Mariam is a distinctive example of Renaissance drama that serves the desire of today's readers and scholars to know not merely how women were represented in the early modern period but also how they themselves perceived their own condition. With this textually emended and fully annotated edition, the play will now be accessible to all readers. The accompanying biography of Cary further enriches our knowledge of both domestic and religious conflicts in the seventeenth century.

Foxe's Book Of Martyrs

Author: John Foxe

Publisher: Jazzybee Verlag

ISBN: 3849620352

Category:

Page: 391

View: 5544

Acts and Monuments by John Foxe, popularly abridged as Foxe's Book of Martyrs, is a celebrated work of church history and martyrology, first published in English in 1563 by John Day. Published early in the reign of Queen Elizabeth I and only five years after the death of the Roman Catholic Queen Mary I, Foxe's Acts and Monuments was an affirmation of the Protestant Reformation in England during a period of religious conflict between Catholics and Protestants. Foxe's account of church history asserted a historical justification that was intended to establish the Church of England as a continuation of the true Christian church rather than as a modern innovation, and it contributed significantly to a nationalistic repudiation of the Roman Catholic Church. The sequence of the work, initially in five books, covered first early Christian martyrs, a brief history of the medieval church, including the Inquisitions, and a history of the Wycliffite or Lollard movement. It then dealt with the reigns of Henry VIII and Edward VI, during which the dispute with Rome had led to the separation of the English Church from papal authority and the issuance of the Book of Common Prayer. The final book treated the reign of Queen Mary and the Marian Persecutions. (courtesy of wikipedia.com)