History

From Catholic To Protestant

Author: Doreen Margaret Rosman

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 116

View: 132

First published in 1996. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.
History

Early Modern Kent, 1540-1640

Author: Michael Zell

Publisher: Boydell & Brewer

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 340

View: 234

An immensely useful volume. HISTORY Kent was at the heart of the nation's history during the period of the Reformation, the reign of Queen Elizabeth I and the decades leading up to the English Civil Wars. This specially commissioned new history offers an accessible but scholarly introduction to the county's history during a century of extraordinary developments. It covers the county's evolution from Henry VIII to Charles I, addressing local political, economic and industrial change in the context of the larger national picture, and highlighting the striking diversity of the county's farming systems and landscapes, both urban and rural. The progress of the Protestant Reformation and its wider consequences for the common people as well as the gentry of Kent are studied in depth. There is also a challenging new interpretation of the origins and growth of political differences among the governors of Kent, which led ultimately to the civil strife of the 1640s. Finally, there is a detailed look at witchcraft and witch-hunting in Kent between the reign of Elizabethan and the Civil War period. MICHAEL ZELL is lecturer in history at the University of Greenwich. Contributors: PATRICIA HYDE, MICHAEL L. ZELL, JOAN THIRSK, JANE ANDREWES, JACQUELINE BOWER, MALCOLM J. GASKILL, JACQUELINE EALES.
History

Travesties and Transgressions in Tudor and Stuart England

Author: David Cressy

Publisher: Oxford University Press on Demand

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 351

View: 304

In Travesties and Transgressions, David Cressy examines how the orderly, Protestant, and hierarchical society of post-Reformation England coped with the cultural challenges posed by beliefs and events outside the social norm. He uses a series of linked stories and close readings of local texts and narratives to investigate unorthodox happenings such as bestiality and monstrous births, seduction and abortion, excommunication and irregular burial, nakedness and cross-dressing. Each story, and the reaction it generated,exposes the strains and stresses of its local time and circumstances. The reigns of Elizabeth, James, and Charles I were witness to endless religious disputes, tussles for power within the aristocracy, and arguments galore about the behaviour and beliefs of common people. Questions raised by'unnatural' episodes were debated throughout society at local and national levels, and engaged the attention of the magistrates, the bishops, the crown, and the court. The resolution of such questions was not taken lightly in a world in which God and the devil still fought for people's souls.
Religion

Unity in Diversity

Author: Randall J. Pederson

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 396

View: 338

In Unity in Diversity, Randall J. Pederson critiques current trends in the study of Puritanism, and proposes a different path for defining Puritanism, centered on unitas and diversitas, by looking at John Downame, Francis Rous, and Tobias Crisp.
Religion

The Oxford Illustrated History of the Reformation

Author: Peter Marshall

Publisher: OUP Oxford

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 320

View: 977

The Reformation was a seismic event in history, whose consequences are still working themselves out in Europe and across the world. The protests against the marketing of indulgences staged by the German monk Martin Luther in 1517 belonged to a long-standing pattern of calls for internal reform and renewal in the Christian Church. But they rapidly took a radical and unexpected turn, engulfing first Germany and then Europe as a whole in furious arguments about how God's will was to be 'saved'. However, these debates did not remain confined to a narrow sphere of theology. They came to reshape politics and international relations; social, cultural, and artistic developments; relations between the sexes; and the patterns and performances of everyday life. They were also the stimulus for Christianity's transformation into a truly global religion, as agents of the Roman Catholic Church sought to compensate for losses in Europe with new conversions in Asia and the Americas. Covering both Protestant and Catholic reform movements, in Europe and across the wider world, this beautifully illustrated volume tells the story of the Reformation from its immediate, explosive beginnings, through to its profound longer-term consequences and legacy for the modern world. The story is not one of an inevitable triumph of liberty over oppression, enlightenment over ignorance. Rather, it tells how a multitude of rival groups and individuals, with or without the support of political power, strove after visions of 'reform'. And how, in spite of themselves, they laid the foundations for the plural and conflicted world we now inhabit.
Religion

Windows into Men's Souls

Author: Kenneth L. Campbell

Publisher: Lexington Books

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 244

View: 337

Windows into Men’s Souls focuses on the ways in which the concept of religious nonconformity was inherent in the English Reformation. The book’s uniqueness lies in its blending of different historiographical traditions dealing with Puritans, Catholics, and Separatists while melding them into a coherent and interpretive analysis of the phenomenon of religious nonconformity as a whole and the religious and intellectual impulses behind it.
History

The Gospel and Henry VIII

Author: Alec Ryrie

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page:

View: 500

During the last decade of Henry VIII's life, his Protestant subjects struggled to reconcile two loyalties: to their Gospel and to their king. This book tells the story of that struggle and describes how a radicalised English Protestantism emerged from it. Focusing on the critical but neglected period 1539–47, Dr Ryrie argues that these years were not the 'conservative reaction' of conventional historiography, but a time of political fluidity and ambiguity. Most evangelicals continued to hope that the king would favour their cause, and remained doctrinally moderate and politically conformist. The author examines this moderate reformism in a range of settings - in the book trade, in the universities, at court and in underground congregations. He also describes its gradual eclipse, as shifting royal policy and the dynamics of the evangelical movement itself pushed reformers towards the more radical, confrontational Protestantism which was to shape the English identity for centuries.
Literary Criticism

The Tragedy of Mariam, the Fair Queen of Jewry

Author: Elizabeth Cary

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 344

View: 987

The Tragedy of Mariam (1613) is the first original play by a woman to be published in England, and its author is the first English woman writer to be memorialized in a biography, which is included with this edition of the play. Mariam is a distinctive example of Renaissance drama that serves the desire of today's readers and scholars to know not merely how women were represented in the early modern period but also how they themselves perceived their own condition. With this textually emended and fully annotated edition, the play will now be accessible to all readers. The accompanying biography of Cary further enriches our knowledge of both domestic and religious conflicts in the seventeenth century.