Mathematics

Geometries

Author: Alekseĭ Bronislavovich Sosinskiĭ

Publisher: American Mathematical Soc.

ISBN:

Category: Mathematics

Page: 301

View: 196

The book is an innovative modern exposition of geometry, or rather, of geometries; it is the first textbook in which Felix Klein's Erlangen Program (the action of transformation groups) is systematically used as the basis for defining various geometries. The course of study presented is dedicated to the proposition that all geometries are created equal--although some, of course, remain more equal than others. The author concentrates on several of the more distinguished and beautiful ones, which include what he terms ``toy geometries'', the geometries of Platonic bodies, discrete geometries, and classical continuous geometries. The text is based on first-year semester course lectures delivered at the Independent University of Moscow in 2003 and 2006. It is by no means a formal algebraic or analytic treatment of geometric topics, but rather, a highly visual exposition containing upwards of 200 illustrations. The reader is expected to possess a familiarity with elementary Euclidean geometry, albeit those lacking this knowledge may refer to a compendium in Chapter 0. Per the author's predilection, the book contains very little regarding the axiomatic approach to geometry (save for a single chapter on the history of non-Euclidean geometry), but two Appendices provide a detailed treatment of Euclid's and Hilbert's axiomatics. Perhaps the most important aspect of this course is the problems, which appear at the end of each chapter and are supplemented with answers at the conclusion of the text. By analyzing and solving these problems, the reader will become capable of thinking and working geometrically, much more so than by simply learning the theory. Ultimately, the author makes the distinction between concrete mathematical objects called ``geometries'' and the singular ``geometry'', which he understands as a way of thinking about mathematics. Although the book does not address branches of mathematics and mathematical physics such as Riemannian and Kahler manifolds or, say, differentiable manifolds and conformal field theories, the ideology of category language and transformation groups on which the book is based prepares the reader for the study of, and eventually, research in these important and rapidly developing areas of contemporary mathematics.
Mathematics

A Course in Modern Geometries

Author: Judith Cederberg

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN:

Category: Mathematics

Page: 441

View: 631

Designed for a junior-senior level course for mathematics majors, including those who plan to teach in secondary school. The first chapter presents several finite geometries in an axiomatic framework, while Chapter 2 continues the synthetic approach in introducing both Euclids and ideas of non-Euclidean geometry. There follows a new introduction to symmetry and hands-on explorations of isometries that precedes an extensive analytic treatment of similarities and affinities. Chapter 4 presents plane projective geometry both synthetically and analytically, and the new Chapter 5 uses a descriptive and exploratory approach to introduce chaos theory and fractal geometry, stressing the self-similarity of fractals and their generation by transformations from Chapter 3. Throughout, each chapter includes a list of suggested resources for applications or related topics in areas such as art and history, plus this second edition points to Web locations of author-developed guides for dynamic software explorations of the Poincaré model, isometries, projectivities, conics and fractals. Parallel versions are available for "Cabri Geometry" and "Geometers Sketchpad".
Science

Liquid Crystals In Complex Geometries

Author: G P Crawford

Publisher: CRC Press

ISBN:

Category: Science

Page: 526

View: 536

Focusing on the applied and basic aspects of confined liquid crystals, this book provides a current treatise of the subject matter and places it in the broader context of electrooptic applications. The book takes an interdisciplinary approach to the
Computers

Mechanical Theorem Proving in Geometries

Author: Wen-tsün Wu

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN:

Category: Computers

Page: 288

View: 747

There seems to be no doubt that geometry originates from such practical activ ities as weather observation and terrain survey. But there are different manners, methods, and ways to raise the various experiences to the level of theory so that they finally constitute a science. F. Engels said, "The objective of mathematics is the study of space forms and quantitative relations of the real world. " Dur ing the time of the ancient Greeks, there were two different methods dealing with geometry: one, represented by the Euclid's "Elements," purely pursued the logical relations among geometric entities, excluding completely the quantita tive relations, as to establish the axiom system of geometry. This method has become a model of deduction methods in mathematics. The other, represented by the relevant work of Archimedes, focused on the study of quantitative re lations of geometric objects as well as their measures such as the ratio of the circumference of a circle to its diameter and the area of a spherical surface and of a parabolic sector. Though these approaches vary in style, have their own features, and reflect different viewpoints in the development of geometry, both have made great contributions to the development of mathematics. The development of geometry in China was all along concerned with quanti tative relations.
Science

Water in Confining Geometries

Author: V. Buch

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN:

Category: Science

Page: 472

View: 307

Written by leading experts in the field, this book gives a wide-ranging and coherent treatment of water in confining geometries. It compiles and relates interdisciplinary work on this hot topic of research important in many areas of science and technology.
Mathematics

Geometries on Surfaces

Author: Burkard Polster

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN:

Category: Mathematics

Page: 490

View: 140

Both a reference and an introduction on the main results about topological geometries on surfaces.
Mathematics

Finite Geometries and Combinatorial Designs

Author: Earl Sidney Kramer

Publisher: American Mathematical Soc.

ISBN:

Category: Mathematics

Page: 312

View: 755

More than eighty participants from all over the world attended an AMS Special Session on Finite Geometries and Combinatorial Designs held in Lincoln, Nebraska, in the fall of 1987. This volume contains the proceedings of that Special Session, in addition to several invited papers. Employing state-of-the-art combinatorial and geometric methods, the papers show significant advances in this area. Topics range over finite geometry, combinatorial designs, their automorphism groups, and related structures. Requiring graduate-level background, this book is intended primarily for researchers in finite geometries and combinatorial designs. However, the interested nonspecialist will find that the book provides an excellent overview of current activity in these areas.
Mathematics

Calabi-Yau Manifolds and Related Geometries

Author: Mark Gross

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN:

Category: Mathematics

Page: 244

View: 865

This is an introduction to a very active field of research, on the boundary between mathematics and physics. It is aimed at graduate students and researchers in geometry and string theory. Proofs or sketches are given for many important results. From the reviews: "An excellent introduction to current research in the geometry of Calabi-Yau manifolds, hyper-Kähler manifolds, exceptional holonomy and mirror symmetry....This is an excellent and useful book." --MATHEMATICAL REVIEWS
Psychology

The Geometries of Visual Space

Author: Mark Wagner

Publisher: Psychology Press

ISBN:

Category: Psychology

Page: 280

View: 177

When most people think of space, they think of physical space. However, visual space concerns space as consciously experienced, and it is studied through subjective measures, such as asking people to use numbers to estimate perceived distances, areas, angles, or volumes. This book explores the mismatch between perception and physical reality, and describes the many factors that influence the perception of space including the meaning assigned to geometric concepts like distance, the judgment methods used to report the experience, the presence or absence of cues to depth, and the orientation of a stimulus with respect to point of view. The main theme of the text is that no single geometry describes visual space, but that the geometry of visual space depends upon the stimulus conditions and mental shifts in the subjective meaning of size and distance. In addition, The Geometries of Visual Space: *contains philosophical, mathematical, and psychophysical background material; *looks at synthetic approaches to space perception including work on hyperbolic, spherical, and Euclidean geometries; *presents a meta-analysis of studies that ask observers to directly estimate size, distance, area, angle, and volume; *looks at the size constancy literature in which observers are asked to adjust a comparison stimulus to match a variety of standards at different distances away; *discusses research that takes a multi-dimensional approach toward studying visual space; and *discusses how spatial experience is influenced by memory. While this book is primarily intended for scholars in perception, mathematical psychology, and psychophysics, it will also be accessible to a wider audience since it is written at a readable level. It will make a good graduate-level textbook on space perception.