Art

How to Draw What You See

Author: Rudy De Reyna

Publisher: Watson-Guptill

ISBN:

Category: Art

Page: 178

View: 504

When it was originally published in 1970, How to Draw What You See zoomed to the top of Watson-Guptill’s best-seller list—and it has remained there ever since. “I believe that you must be able to draw things as you see them—realistically,” wrote Rudy de Reyna in his introduction. Today, generations of artists have learned to draw what they see, to truly capture the world around them, using de Reyna’s methods. How to Draw What You See shows artists how to recognize the basic shape of an object—cube, cylinder, cone, or sphere—and use that shape to draw the object, no matter how much detail it contains. From the Trade Paperback edition.
Art

Zen of Drawing

Author: Peter Parr

Publisher: Pavilion Books

ISBN:

Category: Art

Page: 176

View: 110

Zen of Drawing inspires you to pick up a pen, pencil or an iPad and start drawing what you see with a 'zen' approach. Author Peter Parr has spent his career in animation successfully teaching people to draw and encouraging students to nurture their skills through observational drawing. He advocates a fresh way of looking closely at your subject and enlisting an emotional response, in order to fully appreciate the nature of what you are about to draw. You will learn that whatever you are drawing, it is essential not only to copy its outline but also to ask yourself: is it soft, smooth or rough to the touch? How heavy is it? Is it fragile or solid? Then, having grasped the fundamental characteristics, or zen, of the object, make corresponding marks on the paper - crisp textures, a dense wash, a scratchy or floating line. The chapters cover: keeping a sketchbook; tools (pen, pencil, charcoal, watercolour and iPad); perspective; line and volume; tone and texture; structure and weight; movement and rhythm; energy, balance and composition.
Art

Basic Drawing

Author: Charles Williams

Publisher: Robert Hale Limited

ISBN:

Category: Art

Page: 256

View: 155

"This book is an attempt to replicate the approach to observational drawing that we use in the New English Art Club Drawing School ... I am very grateful to the members of the NEAC who have lent drawings for the book; in the main, they are members who also teach at the Drawing School"--P. 7.
Art

Draw What You See Not What You Think You See

Author: Rachel Shirley

Publisher: Rachel Shirley

ISBN:

Category: Art

Page: 110

View: 257

Drawing lessons for the beginner and the frustrated artist. This drawing guide book could prove helpful if you have low confidence in drawing or if your efforts are less than satisfactory despite repeated attempts at capturing what are seen in front. You might be an absolute beginner or one who has spent a lifetime away from creative activities due to work or family commitments. You might cringe at the idea of picking up a pencil due to a severe inner critic or an affliction that can only be described as picture dyslexia. The first part of this book attempts to decode the underlying causes of this difficulty via a test and questionnaire, to be followed with special drawing exercises from the most basic. The main part of this book does not take the orthodox approach of informing on vanishing points, perspectives and plotting, but merely to help you see what is in front of you. Instead, this book starts at the beginning, to learn the language of line from A, B and C. Within you will find a series of drawing exercises geared towards combating distorted perceptions in drawing by exercising all fields of vision. This includes exercises on visual judgment, symmetrical drawing, abstract drawing, pictures within frames, negative shapes, the weight of marks, upside-down drawing and more. Further chapters explore the realms of tonality, again via the language of shading from A, B and C. Opportunities for progression can be found within the latter chapters exploring specialised shading techniques. A guide on the prescriptive areas of drawing can be found in the final chapter for guidance. This includes a section on plotting your drawing, the artist’s viewfinder, vanishing points and how to draw ellipses. Print book’s dimensions: 8.5x5.5in and 110 pages. With 15,500 words and around 90 images. The author has a PCET qualification in teaching as well as a Degree in Fine Art.
Juvenile Nonfiction

Draw What You See

Author: Kathleen Benson

Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt

ISBN:

Category: Juvenile Nonfiction

Page: 32

View: 245

Looks at the life of the artist Benny Andrews illustrated with his original paintings, from his childhood and youth in rural Georgia, through his studies in Chicago and his activism and artistic success in New York City.
Juvenile Nonfiction

How To Draw

Author: M. Usman

Publisher: Mendon Cottage Books

ISBN:

Category: Juvenile Nonfiction

Page: 47

View: 226

Table of Contents Preface DRAWING CONCEPTS Chapter # 1: The Concept Behind The Art Of Drawing Chapter # 2: Drawing Techniques (a.) Observational drawing (b.) Memory drawing (c.) Imagination drawing Chapter # 3: Sketching THE RELEVANCE OF DRAWING AND COMMON MISTAKES Chapter # 4: Usefulness Of Drawing Art Kindles brain development Assists in problem solving Generates earnings Brings people together Enables one to love learning and be creative Develops one’s confidence Alleviates stress It acts as a means of communication It is a form of leisure activity Chapter # 5: Common Drawing Mistakes Being afraid of shading dark Using the wrong pencil to draw Using the wrong paper for drawing Having the wrong drawing proportion Drawing pets from your eye level Aligning the facial feature Pencil lines Chapter # 6: How to improve your drawing skills Drawing repeatedly Look at other drawings Draw from other drawings Keeping a sketchbook Draw from existing photographs Taking drawing classes Creative Drawing Tips BASIC DRAWING THEORIES Chapter # 7: Understanding basic drawing presumptions Know How To Hold A Pencil Draw what you see Draw often Chapter # 8: Steps Of Simple Observational Drawing Chapter #9: Steps Of Memory Drawing Chapter #10: Drawing From Imagination Conclusion About the Author Publisher Preface Drawing is an art where images are produced. Drawing can be all about creativity. Drawing is one major form of expression within the visual arts. Drawing is often explanatory, with considerable emphasis on observation, problem solving, and composition. Drawing is one of the oldest forms of human expression with evidence for its existence. There are many reasons as to why people draw: satisfactions being one of the reasons, the satisfaction people get when they see your painting of them, the satisfaction they get and the satisfaction you get when you see them happy for that painting you have made, it’s like giving of a gift to the ones you love. Drawing is a workmanship or method through which one produces images on a surface, in most cases the surface is usually a paper plane. For one to ace the art of drawing, time as an investment is required, as there are numerous drawing lessons that one needs to learn. In order to love this art, you need to make drawing a part of your day to day routine. So many individuals believe that for one to be a flawless drawer, the skill ought to be characteristically inborn or hereditary. However, this isn't usually the case; drawing can and ought to be for everyone, it is a skill that can be practiced by anyone. Anybody can draw, as long as you have the desire and will to at least try. All you need to do is to be educated on the vital drawing rules and regulations in order for you to ace this lovely craftsmanship.
Art

The Natural Way to Draw

Author: Kimon Nicolaïdes

Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt

ISBN:

Category: Art

Page: 221

View: 930

A series of exercises designed to assist the art student to develop his own creativity, rather than imitate that of others
Drawing

How to Draw and Paint what You See

Author: Ray Smith

Publisher: Alfred a Knopf Incorporated

ISBN:

Category: Drawing

Page: 256

View: 1000

A new step-by-step system employs hundreds of how-to Dorling Kindersley graphics to teach all aspects and stages of working in watercolors or oils, moving from the basic sketch to the finished work
Art

How to Draw: Easy Step by Step Guide to Learn Drawing for Beginners

Author: Antony Ostrom

Publisher: Jet Solutions

ISBN:

Category: Art

Page:

View: 277

We have created this guide with belief that anyone, even those of you who had never done that before, can learn and is able to learn how to draw. Drawings and paintings are ways of expressing what we see, helping us show our impressions to others. Not all of us see the world around us in the same way, but anyone can learn how to draw and show what they see to others. We have made 6 chapters explaining everything a beginner should know in order to learn how to draw. The guide is made in a way that will help you pick up the basics, gradually progressing to more advanced lessons that are still made and adjusted for beginners. The only thing required from you is a couple of pencils, paper and good will. In our guide you will find out more about perspective in drawings, proportion, colors and coloring techniques, shading, drawing basics, drawing scenery and landscapes, practicing and more difficult lessons such as drawing faces. We will teach you more about: - Drawing Basics – Basic shapes and practicing - Perspective in drawings – how to achieve perspective and different types of perspective - Proportion – what is proportion and why is it important - Colors and lines – use of colors and shading - Drawing faces – learn how to draw faces, step-by-step and effortlessly - Everything an Artist Needs
Art

The Artist's Complete Guide to Figure Drawing

Author: Anthony Ryder

Publisher: Watson-Guptill

ISBN:

Category: Art

Page: 160

View: 322

Many of us want to learn “how to draw.” But as artist Anthony Ryder explains, it’s much more important to learn what to draw. In other words, to observe and draw what we actually see, rather than what we think we see. When it comes to drawing the human figure, this means letting go of learned ideas and expectation of what the figure should look like. It means carefully observing the interplay of form and light, shape and line, that combine to create the actual appearance of human form. In The Artist’s Complete Guide to Figure Drawing, amateur and experienced artists alike are guided toward this new way of seeing and drawing the figure with a three-step drawing method. The book’s progressive course starts with the block-in, an exercise in seeing and establishing the figure’s shape. It then build to the contour, a refined line drawing that represents the figure’s silhouette. The last step is tonal work on the inside of the contour, when light and shadow are shaped to create the illusion of form. Separate chapters explore topics critical to the method: gesture, which expresses a sense of living energy to the figure; light, which largely determines how we see the model; and form, which conveys the figure’s volume and mass. Examples, step-by-steps, and special “tips” offer helpful hints and practical guidance throughout. Lavishly illustrated with the author’s stunning artwork, The Artist’s Complete Guide to Figure Drawing combines solid instruction with thoughtful meditations on the art of drawing, to both instruct and inspire artists of all levels.