History

Identity of England

Author: Robert Colls

Publisher: OUP Oxford

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 426

View: 938

The English stand now in need of a new sense of home and belonging - a reassessment of who they are.This is a history of who they were, written from the perspective of the twenty-first century. It begins by considering how the English state identified an English nation which, from very early days, seems to have seen itself as not simply the creature of state or king. It considers also how in modern times the English nation survivedshattering revolutions in technology, urban living, and global conflict, while at the same time retaining a softer, more human vision of themselves as a people in touch with their nature and their land. They claimed that there was more to living in England than work and wages, there was more to running a vast empire than just exploiting it. For all its faults and inequalities, they identified with their state. For all their shortcomings they were confident of their place in history.As little as forty years ago, these ideas were not much in doubt. Though vague and often contradictory, they held together as the English people held together -as a whole. Indeed, 'Englishness' was hardly recognized as a subject for analysis, except perhaps in a rather ironic and self-mocking vein. But now 'the national question' is back and history is at the top of the agenda. From a rich store of historical memory and possibility, Robert Colls connects the identity of England in the past withthe changing and uncertain identity of England today.
Political Science

British Foreign Policy, National Identity, and Neoclassical Realism

Author: Amelia Hadfield-Amkhan

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers

ISBN:

Category: Political Science

Page: 270

View: 245

This groundbreaking study offers a genuinely multidisciplinary exploration of cultural influences on foreign policy. Through an innovative blend of historical analysis, neoclassical realist theory, and cultural studies, Amelia Hadfield-Amkhan shows how national identity has been a catalyst for British foreign policy decisions, helping the state to both define and defend itself. Representing key points of crisis, her case studies include the 1882 attempt to construct a tunnel to France, the 1982 Falklands War, and the 2003 decision to remain outside the Eurozone. The author argues that these events, marking the decline of a great power, have forced Britain into periods of deep self-reflection that are carved into its culture and etched into its policy stances on central issues of sovereignty, territorial integrity, international recognition, and even monetary policy.
Religion

Religious Identity and National Heritage

Author: Francis-Vincent Anthony

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 320

View: 297

What is the interplay between religion and national culture in modern times? Distinguished scholars reflect on this question based on empirical research. They offer a vast set of insights about how religious identity is connected to the national heritage in which people are born and brought up.
History

Regional Identities in North-East England, 1300-2000

Author: Adrian Gareth Green

Publisher: Boydell Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 236

View: 122

Is North East England really a coherent and self-conscious region? The essays collected here address this topical issue, from the middle ages to the present day.
History

The Making of English National Identity

Author: Krishan Kumar

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 367

View: 681

Why is English national identity so enigmatic and so elusive? Why, unlike the Scots, Welsh, Irish and most of continental Europe, do the English find it so difficult to say who they are? The Making of English National Identity, first published in 2003, is a fascinating exploration of Englishness and what it means to be English. Drawing on historical, sociological and literary theory, Krishan Kumar examines the rise of English nationalism and issues of race and ethnicity from earliest times to the present day. He argues that the long history of the English as an imperial people has, as with other imperial people like the Russians and the Austrians, developed a sense of missionary nationalism which in the interests of unity and empire has necessitated the repression of ordinary expressions of nationalism. Professor Kumar's lively and provocative approach challenges readers to reconsider their pre-conceptions about national identity and who the English really are.