Business & Economics

In Defense of Globalization

Author: Jagdish Bhagwati

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN:

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 344

View: 842

In the passionate debate that currently rages over globalization, critics have been heard blaming it for a host of ills afflicting poorer nations, everything from child labor to environmental degradation and cultural homogenization. Now Jagdish Bhagwati, the internationally renowned economist, takes on the critics, revealing that globalization, when properly governed, is in fact the most powerful force for social good in the world today. Drawing on his unparalleled knowledge of international and development economics, Bhagwati explains why the "gotcha" examples of the critics are often not as compelling as they seem. With the wit and wisdom for which he is renowned, Bhagwati convincingly shows that globalization is part of the solution, not part of the problem. This edition features a new afterword by the author, in which he counters recent writings by prominent journalist Thomas Friedman and the Nobel Laureate economist Paul Samuelson and argues that current anxieties about the economic implications of globalization are just as unfounded as were the concerns about its social effects.
Business & Economics

The Future of Globalization

Author: Ernesto Zedillo

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 432

View: 255

Erudite and topical, this well balanced treatment, with essays from world renowned contributors including the former President of Ireland – Mary Robinson, Jagdish Bhagwati and Nobel prize winner Joseph Stiglitz, considers the forces that propel globalization and those that resist it. Local and regional experiences from Bangladesh, China, India, Latin America and the Middle East are analyzed along with some of globalization’s most potent risks. Giving voice to sophisticated and illustrative reasoning, The Future of Globalization offers useful insights into the extraordinary human achievement brought about by increasing international economic integration, interdependence and interconnectedness, and shows how this has been a powerful force for the progress of humankind. The contributors take stock of the debate on globalization and explore ways to make globalization more beneficial for individuals, communities and countries, as well as ways to reduce its insufficiencies and mitigate the risks it faces. This book will benefit all students of economics, political science and international relations, among others, and is useful to courses that focus on globalization and its impacts.
Business & Economics

Globalization and the State: Volume I

Author: Carlos M. Peláez

Publisher: Palgrave Macmillan

ISBN:

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 272

View: 640

The process of globalization is dynamic in the direction of increasing integration. The effects of economic events in one part of the world affect economic affairs in other parts of the world. This book focuses on the role of the state in IEFP and also explores how institutions and trade affect globalization.
Literary Criticism

Narrative Hospitality in Late Victorian Fiction

Author: Rachel Hollander

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 218

View: 309

Bringing together poststructuralist ethical theory with late Victorian debates about the morality of literature, this book reconsiders the ways in which novels engender an ethical orientation or response in their readers, explaining how the intersections of nation, family, and form in the late realist English novel produce a new ethics of hospitality. Hollander reads texts that both portray and enact a unique ethical orientation of welcoming the other, a narrative hospitality that combines the Victorians’ commitment to engaging with the real world with a more modern awareness of difference and the limits of knowledge. While classic nineteenth-century realism rests on a sympathy-based model of moral relations, novels by authors such as George Eliot, Thomas Hardy, and Olive Schreiner present instead an ethical recognition of the distance between self and other. Opening themselves to the other in their very structure and narrative form, the visited texts both represent and theorize the ethics of hospitality, anticipating twentieth-century philosophy’s recognition of the limits of sympathy. As colonial conflicts, nationalist anxiety, and the intensification of the "woman question" became dominant cultural concerns in the 1870s and 80s, the problem of self and other, known and unknown, began to saturate and define the representation of home in the English novel. This book argues that in the wake of an erosion of confidence in the ability to understand that which is unlike the self, a moral code founded on sympathy gave way to an ethics of hospitality, in which the concept of home shifts to acknowledge the permeability and vulnerability of not only domestic but also national spaces. Concluding with Virginia Woolf’s reexamination of the novel’s potential to educate the reader in negotiating relations of alterity in a more fully modernist moment, Hollanders suggest that the late Victorian novel embodies a unique and previously unrecognized ethical mode between Victorian realism and a post-World- War-I ethics of modernist form.
Economics

The American Economic Review

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Economics

Page:

View: 574

Includes annual List of doctoral dissertations in political economy in progress in American universities and colleges; and the Hand book of the American Economic Association.
Education

Children of a New World

Author: Paula S. Fass

Publisher: NYU Press

ISBN:

Category: Education

Page: 269

View: 284

2007 Choice Outstanding Academic Title At the funeral of Matthew Shepard—the young Wyoming man brutally murdered for being gay—the Reverend Fred Phelps led his parishioners in protest, displaying signs with slogans like “Matt Shepard rots in Hell,” “Fags Die God Laughs,” and “God Hates Fags.” In counter-protest, activists launched an “angel action,” dressing in angel costumes, with seven-foot high wings, and creating a visible barrier so one would not have to see the hateful signs. Though long thought of as one of the most virulently anti-gay genres of contemporary American politics and culture, in God Hates Fags, Michael Cobb maintains that religious discourses have curiously figured as the most potent and pervasive forms of queer expression and activism throughout the twentieth century. Cobb focuses on how queers have assumed religious rhetoric strategically to respond to the violence done against them, alternating close readings of writings by James Baldwin, Tennessee Williams, Jean Toomer, Dorothy Allison, and Stephen Crane with critical legal and political analyses of Supreme Court Cases and anti-gay legislation. He also pays deep attention to the political strategies, public declarations, websites, interviews, and other media made by key religious right organizations that have mounted the most successful regulations and condemnations of homosexuality.
Political Science

Governance in a Disenchanted World

Author: Helmut Willke

Publisher: Edward Elgar Pub

ISBN:

Category: Political Science

Page: 166

View: 181

This book expounds the idea of a disenchanted world composed of nation states and global functional systems. The nation state is losing some of its regulatory prerogatives and, at the same time, extending its legitimacy base in 'chains of legitimacy' to transnational institutions. There is neither a global democracy nor a global government. Therefore, establishing alternative forms of legitimacy, accountability and participation in a secular world seem mandatory. Helmut Willke examines the resurgence of moral reasoning in global affairs, pushed by various fundamentalisms, that indicates a real danger of a regression of democracy. The separation of private morals and public policies, the book argues, remains the basis of global aspirations of democracy.
History

War, Citizenship, Territory

Author: Deborah Cowen

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 418

View: 778

For all too obvious reasons, war, empire, and military conflict have become extremely hot topics in the academy. Given the changing nature of war, one of the more promising areas of scholarly investigation has been the development of new theories of war and war’s impact on society. War, Citizenship, Territory features 19 chapters that look at the impact of war and militarism on citizenship, whether traditional territorially-bound national citizenship or "transnational" citizenship. Cowen and Gilbert argue that while there has been an explosion of work on citizenship and territory, Western academia’s avoidance of the immediate effects of war (among other things) has led them to ignore war, which they contend is both pervasive and well nigh permanent. This volume sets forth a new, geopolitically based theory of war’s transformative role on contemporary forms of citizenship and territoriality, and includes empirical chapters that offer global coverage.