Aesthetics

In Praise of Shadows

Author: Junʼichirō Tanizaki

Publisher: Vintage Books

ISBN:

Category: Aesthetics

Page: 73

View: 768

This is an enchanting essay on aesthetics by one of the greatest Japanese novelists. Tanizaki's eye ranges over architecture, jade, food, toilets, and combines an acute sense of the use of space in buildings, as well as perfect descriptions of lacquerware under candlelight and women in the darkness of the house of pleasure. The result is a classic description of the collision between the shadows of traditional Japanese interiors and the dazzling light of the modern age.
Aesthetics, Japanese

In Praise of Shadows

Author: Junʼichirō Tanizaki

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Aesthetics, Japanese

Page: 48

View: 255

Flame

IN PRAISE OF SHADOWS

Author: 杉本博司

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Flame

Page: 1

View: 567

This artist's book, in Praise of Shadows from Japanese artist and photographer Sugimoto, explores the image of the candle flame and the shadow it casts. Based on an installation in which the artist created seemingly uniform, but slightly different transparent images of candle flames and then projected them onto a wall with the light of actual, other candle flames -- this book conjures a meditation on that most poetic of symbols. Born in 1948 in Tokyo, Japan, Sugimoto is best known for his remarkable seascapes and landscapes with their infinitely subtle gradations of black and their rigorous attention to geometrical form and composition. Sugimoto lives and works in New York.
Art

In Praise of Shadows

Author: Paolo Colombo

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Art

Page: 150

View: 848

In Praise of Shadows revolves around shadows, shadow theatre and silhouettes as well as stories based on traditional folklore, contemporary short stories, literary works and simple narratives, all expressed with economy of means. The central metaphor of this book is the shadow theatre in Turkey and Greece, and the character Karagoz (in Turkey)/Karaghiozis (in Greece), an incorrigible trickster who has hundreds of adventures and misadventures with a varied group of characters. In addition to providing an in-depth explanation of this popular tradition, In Praise of Shadows also highlights some examples of great animation classics, namely the works of Ladislas Starewitch and Lotte Reiniger, as well as reinterpretations by noteworthy contemporary artists such as Haluk Akakce, Nathalie Djurberg, William Kentridge, Katariina Lillqvist, Jockum Nordstrom, Christiana Soulou, Andrew Vickery and Kara Walker.
Art

In Praise of Nonsense

Author: Ted Hiebert

Publisher: McGill-Queen's Press - MQUP

ISBN:

Category: Art

Page: 236

View: 936

A speculative exploration of theory, subjectivity and art in an age of uncertainty.
History

Modern African Women

Author: Simone Schwarz-Bart

Publisher: Univ of Wisconsin Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 256

View: 386

Modern African Women offers powerful and unforgettable tales from Senegal to South Africa, from the nineteenth century to the present. These modern African rulers, leaders, and visionaries include Madam Yoko, Queen of the Kpaa Mende and national heroine of Sierra Leone; Princess Kesso, a Fulani Muslim princess from Guinea who became one of the world’s first black models; Alice Lenshina, who fought British colonial rule in Zambia and was considered a prophet in the Lumpa Church; Ellen Kuzwayo, member of the African National Congress whose struggle for civil and women’s rights landed her in prison; Dulcie September, the ANC representative in France, killed for her ardent support for the cause of freedom; Miriam Makeba, internationally loved singer South African singer; Winnie Mandela, who carried on the struggle during Nelson Mandela’s long imprisonment; and many others.
Art

Grasping Shadows

Author: William Chapman Sharpe

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN:

Category: Art

Page: 440

View: 327

With the shadow's seductive associations to sexuality, mystery, danger, intangible power, and death, the use of shadows as artistic technique saturates both classic and modern art forms, and yet the practice remains almost invisible. As the first full-length study of art shadows in over a decade, Grasping Shadows ranges from classic works by Rembrandt, Dickens, Picasso, Disney, and Warhol to contemporary street art, popular songs, billboards, and architecture to propose a general theory of how all shadows function in texts and visual media, ultimately offering four main categories. Sharpe explores the diverse ways shadows appear in literature, painting, photography, and film, insisting that literary and visual meanings of shadows cannot be separated, and that art-shadows must be analyzed as part of a cultural field in which words and images continually overlap and reinforce each other's meanings. Beginning with a summary of scholarship to date, the introduction addresses how real-world shadows function, and gives an overview of the strategies involved in representing shadows from the Renaissance onward. The first chapter sets out a theory of how the meanings of shadows are generated. Subsequent chapters, each centered on an influential literary text, explore in detail the four kinds of shadows that visual artists and writers use. The last chapter presents a case study of how shadows have impacted the art of the modern city, from Renoir and Zola to film noir to advanced projection systems capturing the shadows of passers-by on streets around the globe. The book concludes with a philosophical meditation on how living with shadows enriches everyday life.