Sports & Recreation

In These Girls, Hope Is a Muscle

Author: Madeleine Blais

Publisher: Open Road + Grove/Atlantic

ISBN:

Category: Sports & Recreation

Page: 272

View: 382

Originally published in 1995, Madeleine Blais’ In These Girls, Hope is a Muscle is a modern sports writing classic. Expanded and updated with a new epilogue, Blais’ book tells the story of a season in the life of the Amherst Lady Hurricanes a girls’ high school basketball team from the Western Massachusetts college town. The Hurricanes were a talented team with a near-perfect record, but for five straight years, when it came to the crunch of the playoffs, they somehow lacked the desire to go all the way. Now, led by senior guards Jen Pariseau, a three-point specialist, and Jamila Wideman, an All-American phenom, this was the year to prove themselves. It was a season to test their passion for the sport and their loyalty to each other, and a chance to discover who they really were. As an off-season of summer jobs and basketball camps turns to fall, as students arrive and the games begin, Blais charts the ups and downs of the team and paints a portrait of the wider Amherst community, which comes to revel in the athletic exploits of their girls. Finally, a women’s team was getting the attention they deserve. And the Hurricanes were richly deserving; these teenage girls are fierce and funny, smart and ambitious, and they are the heart of this gripping book.
Literary Collections

The Heart Is an Instrument

Author: Madeleine Blais

Publisher: Univ of Massachusetts Press

ISBN:

Category: Literary Collections

Page: 360

View: 289

From the foreword by Geneva Overholser. What is it about really fine writers, how they delight, intrigue, compel us? Style, you say. But style is not something you begin with. Rather, it's what you end up with, a result of far more fundamental traits. Traits such as an ear and an eye and a heart, traits that Madeliene Blais has honed superbly well. This is a book well named: The Heart Is an Instrument: Portraits in Journalism. The heart is surely first among Blais's gifts. Whether she is writing about the famous--playwright tennessee Williams, novelist Mary Gordon--or about the least elevated among us--a teenage prostitute infected with the AIDS virus, a homeless schizophrenic--she brings to her subjects an incomparable empathy.
Biography & Autobiography

Uphill Walkers

Author: Madeleine Blais

Publisher: Open Road + Grove/Atlantic

ISBN:

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 272

View: 677

In 1952, Madeleine Blais's father died suddenly, leaving his pregnant wife and their five young children to face their future alone. Uphill Walkers is the story of how the Blais family pulled together to survive and ultimately thrive in an era when a single-parent family was almost unheard-of. As they came of age in an Irish-American household that often struggled to make ends meet, the Blais children would rise again and again above all obstacles — at every step of the way inspired by a mother who expected much but gave even more, as she saved and sacrificed to provide each child with the same education they would have received had their father lived. Beautiful, heartbreaking, and full of wonderful insights about sisterhood, brotherhood, and the ties that bind us together, Uphill Walkers is a moving portrait of the love it takes to succeed against the odds — and what it means to be a family. "In plain-spoken prose ... Uphill Walkers has a remarkable dignity and eloquence." — Carmela Ciuraru, USA Today "Beautiful ... This is the story of a family, united by blood, pride, and the bonds that defy logic." — Ellen Kanner, The Miami Herald "Scrupulously candid and deeply compassionate...." — Reeve Lindbergh, The Washington Post Book World
Family & Relationships

Help your Child or Teen Get Back On Track

Author: Kenneth Talan

Publisher: Jessica Kingsley Publishers

ISBN:

Category: Family & Relationships

Page: 288

View: 947

Help Your Child or Teen Get Back on Track offers specific self-help interventions and a wide-ranging, practical discussion of the types of professional help available for a child or adolescent with emotional and behavioral problems. The book covers topics that would be discussed during a consultation with a child psychiatrist. The first section offers practical guidance and ideas to help parents understand their child's problems and learn to distinguish between normal disruption and that which warrants professional treatment. The second section of the book includes useful information for those parents who are considering, seeking, or already involved with professional help for their child. Essential reading for parents who are worried about a child or adolescent with emotional and behavioral problems, this book is also a useful resource for social workers, psychologists, school counselors, pediatricians, and adult psychiatrists.
Biography & Autobiography

To the New Owners

Author: Madeleine Blais

Publisher: Atlantic Monthly Press

ISBN:

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 272

View: 249

In the 1970s, Madeleine Blais’ in-laws purchased a vacation house on Martha’s Vineyard for the exorbitant sum of $80,000. 2.2 miles down a poorly marked, one lane dirt road, the house was better termed a shack—it had no electricity, no modern plumbing, the roof leaked, and mice had invaded the walls. It was perfect. Sitting on Tisbury Great Pond—well-stocked with oysters and crab for foraged dinners—the house faced the ocean and the sky, and though it was eventually replaced by a sturdier structure, the ethos remained the same: no heat, no TV, and no telephone. Instead, there were countless hours at the beach, meals cooked and savored with friends, nights talking under the stars, until at last, the house was sold in 2014. To the New Owners is Madeleine Blais’ charming, evocative memoir of this house, and of the Vineyard itself—from the history of the island and its famous visitors to the ferry, the pie shops, the quirky charms and customs, and the abundant natural beauty. But more than that, this is an elegy for a special place. Many of us have one place that anchors our most powerful memories. For Blais, it was the Vineyard house—a retreat and a dependable pleasure that also measured changes in her family. As children were born and grew up, as loved ones aged and passed away, the house was a constant. And now, the house lives on in the hearts of those who cherished it.
Social Science

Making Sense of Women's Lives

Author: Lauri Umansky, co-editor with Paul K. Longmore

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 572

View: 302

Making Sense of Women's Lives presents a wide range of writings about women's lives in the United States. Michele Plott and Lauri Umansky have drawn on their experiences as both students and professors to assemble the collection. Seeking to provide as full a sampling from a diverse and intellectually vibrant field as one volume permits, the editors have also chosen writing that makes an enjoyable read. A few of the selections here represent the undisputed 'classics' of the field. More of them constitute simply the works, drawn from academic and nonacademic sources alike, that could make a difference in understanding what it means to be female in America.
Language Arts & Disciplines

The Undeclared War between Journalism and Fiction

Author: D. Underwood

Publisher: Springer

ISBN:

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 250

View: 103

In this volume, Doug Underwood asks whether much of what is now called literary journalism is, in fact, 'literary,' and whether it should rank with the great novels by such journalist-literary figures as Twain, Cather, and Hemingway, who believed that fiction was the better place for a realistic writer to express the important truths of life.
Social Science

Raising Our Athletic Daughters

Author: Jean Zimmerman

Publisher: Main Street Books

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 272

View: 410

Now in paperback, the first book to document how participating in sports changes young girls' lives during the difficult years of adolescence. From high-profile women's professional leagues to high-school-level champions, girl athletes are acheiving record breakthroughs. Witness, for example, the first spectacular season of the WNBA, or the celebrated victories of women's teams at the 1996 Olympics. The female athlete is a new media darling especially beloved of today's teenage girls, who are almost as likely to have pictures of Rebecca Lobo, Mia Hamm, or Gabrielle Reece on their walls as posters of Leonardo DiCaprio. So it seems paradoxical that many books and studies attest to a truly sobering picture of girls' lives. With her book Reviving Ophelia, Mary Pipher was only the latest in a string of theorists to describe the dramatic ways in which girls loose self-esteem during the critical years of adolescence, contributing to eating disorders, drug problems, and chronic depression in many young women. In Raising Our Athletic Daughters, journalists Zimmerman and Reavill set out to talk with girls and their parents about how sports can transform girls' lives. Here are firsthand stories from the inner cities and rural playing fields across the nation, offering compelling evidence that participation in athletics makes an extraordinary difference in the lives of young girls, from reducing pregnancy rates and substance abuse to increasing college attendance. Raising Our Athletic Daughters is a clarion call for all those eager to help their children succeed and level the playing field, at last. From the Trade Paperback edition.
Reference

Encyclopedia of Life Writing

Author: Margaretta Jolly

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Reference

Page: 1150

View: 131

First published in 2001. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.
Biography & Autobiography

Queen of the Court

Author: Madeleine Blais

Publisher: Atlantic Monthly Press

ISBN:

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page:

View: 643

Alice Marble (1913-1990) was a game-changer in every sense of the word. A pioneering tennis player, she blended strength and glamour in a way no woman had before. Billie Jean King later called her “a picture of unrestrained athleticism.” With her powerful serve and volley, she won 18 major championships, and in the banner summer of 1939 she won singles, doubles, and mixed-doubles titles at both Wimbledon and the U. S. Open, landing her on the cover of Life magazine, photographed by Alfred Eisenstaedt. In the off-season, she designed a clothing line and sang love songs in the Sert Bar at the Waldorf Astoria to rave reviews. World War II, during which she was recruited as a spy by the U. S., effectively ended her playing career, but Marble remained both influential—persuading the U. S. Tennis Association to break the color barrier and allow Althea Gibson to compete—and a celebrity, appearing in the movie Pat and Mike with Spencer Tracy and Katharine Hepburn, and palling around with the likes of Clark Gable and Carol Lombard. In our own time, the remarkable Alice Marble has regrettably slipped from view. Now, Pulitzer Prize-winning writer Madeleine Blais brings vividly back to life one of America’s most celebrated and intriguing women and evokes the dramatic times she lived through, from the Roaring 20s to the post-World War II era.