Science

Information Processing and Living Systems

Author: Vladimir B. Baji?

Publisher: Imperial College Press

ISBN:

Category: Science

Page: 777

View: 841

Information processing and information flow occur in the course of an organism's development and throughout its lifespan. Organisms do not exist in isolation, but interact with each other constantly within a complex ecosystem. The relationships between organisms, such as those between prey or predator, host and parasite, and between mating partners, are complex and multidimensional. In all cases, there is constant communication and information flow at many levels.This book focuses on information processing by life forms and the use of information technology in understanding them. Readers are first given a comprehensive overview of biocomputing before navigating the complex terrain of natural processing of biological information using physiological and analogous computing models. The remainder of the book deals with ?artificial? processing of biological information as a human endeavor in order to derive new knowledge and gain insight into life forms and their functioning. Specific innovative applications and tools for biological discovery are provided as the link and complement to biocomputing.Since ?artificial? processing of biological information is complementary to natural processing, a better understanding of the former helps us improve the latter. Consequently, readers are exposed to both domains and, when dealing with biological problems of their interest, will be better equipped to grasp relevant ideas.
Computers

Information Processing and Biological Systems

Author: Samuli Niiranen

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN:

Category: Computers

Page: 230

View: 489

Living beings require constant information processing for survival. In cells, information is being processed and propagated at various levels, from the gene regulatory network to chemical pathways, to the interaction with the environment. How this is achieved and how information is coded is still poorly understood. For example, what a cell interprets as information in the temporal level of an mRNA and what is interpreted as noise remains an open question. Recently, information theoretical methods and other tools, developed in the context of engineering and natural sciences, have been applied to study diverse biological processes. This book covers the latest findings on how information is processed in various biological processes, ranging from information processing and propagation in gene regulatory networks to information processing in natural language. An overview is presented of the state-of-the-art in information processing in biological systems and the opinion of current leaders in this research field on future research directions.
Science

Information Processing and Living Systems

Author: Vladimir B. Baji?

Publisher: Imperial College Press

ISBN:

Category: Science

Page: 777

View: 665

Information processing and information flow occur in the course of an organism's development and throughout its lifespan. Organisms do not exist in isolation, but interact with each other constantly within a complex ecosystem. The relationships between organisms, such as those between prey or predator, host and parasite, and between mating partners, are complex and multidimensional. In all cases, there is constant communication and information flow at many levels.This book focuses on information processing by life forms and the use of information technology in understanding them. Readers are first given a comprehensive overview of biocomputing before navigating the complex terrain of natural processing of biological information using physiological and analogous computing models. The remainder of the book deals with ?artificial? processing of biological information as a human endeavor in order to derive new knowledge and gain insight into life forms and their functioning. Specific innovative applications and tools for biological discovery are provided as the link and complement to biocomputing.Since ?artificial? processing of biological information is complementary to natural processing, a better understanding of the former helps us improve the latter. Consequently, readers are exposed to both domains and, when dealing with biological problems of their interest, will be better equipped to grasp relevant ideas.
Philosophy

Information and Living Systems

Author: George Terzis

Publisher: MIT Press

ISBN:

Category: Philosophy

Page: 464

View: 421

Information shapes biological organization in fundamental ways and at every organizational level. Because organisms use information--including DNA codes, gene expression, and chemical signaling--to construct, maintain, repair, and replicate themselves, it would seem only natural to use information-related ideas in our attempts to understand the general nature of living systems, the causality by which they operate, the difference between living and inanimate matter, and the emergence, in some biological species, of cognition, emotion, and language. And yet philosophers and scientists have been slow to do so. This volume fills that gap. Information and Living Systems offers a collection of original chapters in which scientists and philosophers discuss the informational nature of biological organization at levels ranging from the genetic to the cognitive and linguistic.The chapters examine not only familiar information-related ideas intrinsic to the biological sciences but also broader information-theoretic perspectives used to interpret their significance. The contributors represent a range of disciplines, including anthropology, biology, chemistry, cognitive science, information theory, philosophy, psychology, and systems theory, thus demonstrating the deeply interdisciplinary nature of the volume's bioinformational theme.
Psychology

Stress and Coping

Author: T. Field

Publisher: Psychology Press

ISBN:

Category: Psychology

Page: 376

View: 890

Published in 1985, Stress and Coping is a valuable contribution to the field of Psychology PP
Science

Molecular and Biological Physics of Living Systems

Author: R.K. Mishra

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN:

Category: Science

Page: 298

View: 447

The living organisms and systems possess extraordinary properties of programmed development, differentiation, growth, response, movement, duplication of key molecules and in m any cases higher mental functions. But the organisms are physical objects so they must follow laws of physics yet they do not seem to obey them. Physicists cannot easily persuade themselves to accept this as finally true. Non-living objects are governed by these laws of physics and they can explain these properties. However, in the living systems too phenomena encountered like coupled non-linear interactions, manybody effects, cooperativity, coherence, phase transitions, reversible metastable states are being understood better with the aid of powerful theoretical and experimental techniques and hope is raised that these may let us understand the mysteriousness of life. Contributors to this volume are a small fraction of rapidly growing scientific opinion that these aspects of living bodies are to be expected in a hitherto inadequately suspected state of matter which is in the main directed by these physical properties pushed almost to limit. This state of matter, the living matter, deserves to be called The Living State. Mishra proposes that given hydrogenic orbitals, atoms showing easy hybridisability and multiple valances, molecules with low-lying electronic levels, "loosestructure", and a metabolic pump in thermodynamically open system, various fundamental properties of living state can emerge automatically. Structurally these are all known to be present.
Medical

Genomics and Proteomics Engineering in Medicine and Biology

Author: Metin Akay

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN:

Category: Medical

Page: 450

View: 317

Current applications and recent advances in genomics and proteomics Genomics and Proteomics Engineering in Medicine and Biology presents a well-rounded, interdisciplinary discussion of a topic that is at the cutting edge of both molecular biology and bioengineering. Compiling contributions by established experts, this book highlights up-to-date applications of biomedical informatics, as well as advancements in genomics-proteomics areas. Structures and algorithms are used to analyze genomic data and develop computational solutions for pathological understanding. Topics discussed include: Qualitative knowledge models Interpreting micro-array data Gene regulation bioinformatics Methods to analyze micro-array Cancer behavior and radiation therapy Error-control codes and the genome Complex life science multi-database queries Computational protein analysis Tumor and tumor suppressor proteins interactions
Science

Energy and Information Transfer in Biological Systems

Author: Larissa S. Brizhik

Publisher: World Scientific

ISBN:

Category: Science

Page: 272

View: 306

This volume contains papers based on the workshop OC Energy and Information Transfer in Biological Systems: How Physics Could Enrich Biological UnderstandingOCO, held in Italy in 2002. The meeting was a forum aimed at evaluating the potential and outlooks of a modern physics approach to understanding and describing biological processes, especially regarding the transition from the microscopic chemical scenario to the macroscopic functional configurations of living matter. In this frame some leading researchers presented and discussed several basic topics, such as the photon interaction with biological systems also from the viewpoint of photon information processes and of possible applications; the influence of electromagnetic fields on the self-organization of biosystems including the nonlinear mechanism for energy transfer and storage; and the influence of the structure of water on the properties of biological matter."
Medical

Complexity in Biological Information Processing

Author: Novartis Foundation

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN:

Category: Medical

Page: 250

View: 369

Many human diseases arise from the malfunction of signalling components, in particular alterations of multiple components of an integrated signalling network. Experimental and computational tools to describe and quantify these changes are increasingly available, providing a wealth of data that can stimulate systematic analysis of the entire signalling network and enable prediction of disease states not easily recognizable from complex data sets. This groundbreaking book explores the structural and temporal complexity in biological signalling exemplified in neuronal, immunological, humoral and genetic signal transduction networks. With discussions between experimentalists and theoretically oriented scientists, this book takes an interdisciplinary approach that may help switch the analysis of biological signalling from descriptive to predictive science and capture the behaviour of entire systems. Explores the structural and temporal complexity in biological signalling. Represents an unusual collocation of three different areas: immunology, cell signalling and neural networks. Contains interdisciplinary discussions between experimentalists and theoretically oriented scientists, in particular those working on computer simulations.
Science

Principles of Quantitative Living Systems Science

Author: James R. Simms

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN:

Category: Science

Page: 280

View: 133

In 1978, when the book Living Systems was published, it contained the prediction that the sciences that were concerned with the biological and social sciences would, in the future, be stated as rigorously as the “hard sciences” that study such nonliving phenomena as temperature, distance, and the interaction of chemical elements. Principles of Quantitative Living Systems Science, the first of a planned series of three books, begins an attempt to fulfill that prediction. The view that living things are similar to other parts of the physical world, differing only in their complexity, was explicitly stated in the early years of the twentieth century by the biologist Ludwig von Bertalanffy. His ideas could not be published until the end of the war in Europe in the 1940s. Von Bertalanffy was strongly opposed to vitalism, the theory current among biologists at the time that life could only be explained by recourse to a “vital principle” or God. He c- sidered living things to be a part of the natural order, “systems” like atoms and molecules and planetary systems. Systems were described as being made up of a number of interrelated and interdependent parts, but because of the interrelations, the total system became more than the sum of those parts. These ideas led to the development of systems movements, in both Europe and the United States, that included not only biologists but scientists in other fields as well. Systems societies were formed on both continents.