Education

It Just Doesn't Add Up

Author: Paul Moorcraft

Publisher: Tarquin

ISBN:

Category: Education

Page: 192

View: 505

This book explains dyscalculia - but for the first time from the perspective of a sufferer. It is estimated up to 5% of the population suffers from the condition. Often humorous, sufferers and their carers will find it a relief and a joy to share experiences and learn more about how to cope.
Education

Dyscalculia Pocketbook

Author: Judy Hornigold

Publisher: Teachers' Pocketbooks

ISBN:

Category: Education

Page: 128

View: 613

Dyscalculia is a specific learning difficulty that affects a person’s mathematical ability. It is estimated that around 6% of the population have dyscalculia, so in a typical classroom there is likely to be at least one dyscalculic learner. Research is ongoing, but we know that dyscalculia is a much deeper-rooted problem than just ‘being bad at maths’. This Pocketbook looks at the difficulties faced by pupils with dyscalculia and explores the support strategies that work. The author begins by summarising and explaining what we currently know about dyscalculia. Key indicators are described, along with various ways of screening and assessing to identify students with this SpLD. There’s a helpful chapter on ‘maths anxiety’ and a central practical section on teaching strategies that will help learners to work around the obstacles dyscalculia presents. Details of the three components of a mathematical idea and the six levels of learning - intuitive, concrete, pictorial, abstract, application and communication - provide good underpinning structure. Games that help develop number sense and the ten most effective classroom approaches are also covered. A final resource section and maths glossary complete the picture. As with all books in the Teachers’ Pocketbooks series, this is a practical, ‘how to’ guide, throughout which cartoons, diagrams and visual prompts support the text.
History

Dying for the Truth

Author: Paul Moorcraft

Publisher: Pen and Sword

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 376

View: 782

The role of war correspondents is crucial to democracy and the publics discovery of the truth. Without them, the temptation to manipulate events with propaganda would be irresistible to politicians of all hues. It starts by examining how journalists have plied their trade over the years most particularly from the Crimean War onwards. Their impact on the conduct of war has been profound and the author, an experienced journalist, explains in his frank and readable manner how this influence has shaped the actions of politicians and military commanders. By the same token the media is a potentially valuable tool to those in authority and this two-way relationship is examined. Technical developments and 24 hour news have inevitably changed the nature of war reporting and their political masters ignore this at their peril and the author examines the key milestones on this road. Using his own and others experiences in recent conflicts, be they Korea, Falklands, Balkans, Iraq or Afghanistan, the author opens the readers eyes to an aspect of warfare that is all too often overlooked but can be crucial to the outcome. The publics attitude to the day-to-day conduct of war is becoming ever more significant and this fascinating book examines why.