Social Science

Mapping Feminist Anthropology in the Twenty-First Century

Author: Ellen Lewin

Publisher: Rutgers University Press

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 310

View: 585

Feminist anthropology emerged in the 1970s as a much-needed corrective to the discipline’s androcentric biases. Far from being a marginalized subfield, it has been at the forefront of developments that have revolutionized not only anthropology, but also a host of other disciplines. This landmark collection of essays provides a contemporary overview of feminist anthropology’s historical and theoretical origins, the transformations it has undergone, and the vital contributions it continues to make to cutting-edge scholarship. Mapping Feminist Anthropology in the Twenty-First Century brings together a variety of contributors, giving a voice to both younger researchers and pioneering scholars who offer insider perspectives on the field’s foundational moments. Some chapters reveal how the rise of feminist anthropology shaped—and was shaped by—the emergence of fields like women’s studies, black and Latina studies, and LGBTQ studies. Others consider how feminist anthropologists are helping to frame the direction of developing disciplines like masculinity studies, affect theory, and science and technology studies. Spanning the globe—from India to Canada, from Vietnam to Peru—Mapping Feminist Anthropology in the Twenty-First Century reveals the important role that feminist anthropologists have played in worldwide campaigns against human rights abuses, domestic violence, and environmental degradation. It also celebrates the work they have done closer to home, helping to explode the developed world’s preconceptions about sex, gender, and sexuality.
Social Science

Cultural Anthropology

Author: Serena Nanda

Publisher: SAGE Publications

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 456

View: 214

Cultural Anthropology integrates critical thinking, explores rich ethnographies, and prompts students to skillfully explore and study today’s world. Readers will better understand social structures by examining themselves, their culture, and cultures from all over the globe. Serena Nanda and Richard L. Warms show how the analytical understandings and tools derived from over a century of systematically collecting data and thinking about culture can help students analyze, understand, and act effectively in the world. With a practical emphasis on areas such as medicine, forensics, development and advocacy, this book takes an applied approach to anthropology. The authors cover a broad range of theories, both historical and contemporary, without any insistence on any particular approach, and balance it with applied, contemporary, real-world global issues. The new Twelfth Edition includes a wealth of new examples and over 500 references that update ethnographic examples, statistical information, and theoretical approaches.
Social Science

Feminist Ethnography

Author: Dána-Ain Davis

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 218

View: 194

A timely “problem-based” approach to the history and application of feminist ethnography, this text features over 25 Essentials (excerpts from key texts) and 25 Spotlights (interviews with contemporary feminist ethnographers) and is guided by critical questions about feminist methods as well as debates and challenges in the field.
Social Science

Gender & Difference in a Globalizing World

Author: Frances E. Mascia-Lees

Publisher: Waveland PressInc

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 299

View: 422

Francis E. Mascia-Lees' ability to synthesize complex ideas rewards readers with a text that clearly conceptualizes how differences of gender, race, class, and sexuality structure today's globalizing world. It exposes the strengths and weaknesses of different theoretical orientations used in anthropology to study gender, difference, power, and inequality including feminist anthropology; black feminist anthropology; lesbian/gay/bisexual/transgendered theory; practice, postcolonial, symbolic, and psychological anthropology; as well as social evolutionism, sociobiology, and evolutionary psychology, among others. Mascia-Lees combines core components of these perspectives with insightful analyses and ethnographic examples to illustrate how global events and transformations have molded and continue to shape gender identities, behaviors, and expectations and produce and sustain worldwide inequalities. This exemplary treatment provides a solid background to understand complex issues and to think critically about remedying uneven degrees of privilege and experiences of oppression both within and across nations.
Religion

Anthropology

Author: Susan A. Ross

Publisher: Liturgical Press

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 184

View: 576

Drawing on the wisdom and teaching experience of highly respected theologians, the Engaging Theology series builds a firm foundation for graduate study and other ministry formation programs. Each of the six volumes—Scripture, Jesus, God, Discipleship, Anthropology, and Church—is concerned with retrieving, carefully evaluating, and constructively interpreting the Christian tradition. Comprehensive in scope and accessibly written, these volumes, used together or independently, will stimulate rich theological reflection and discussion. More important, the series will create and sustain the passion of the next generation of theologians and church leaders. What does it mean to be human in the twenty-first century? Susan Ross explores this question through the lens of human desires: for God, freedom, knowledge, love, and pleasure, but also for power, consumer goods, self-gratification, and money. Beginning with biblical narratives of human desires, she goes on to consider how ancient, medieval, and modern thinkers have wrestled with the various ways that human beings have sought fulfillment in the world and in God. The twenty-first century brings new questions and continuing challenges: In a world of increasing complexity and fragmentation, can we still talk about the self? How have feminism and new thinking about sexuality changed the ways we think about ourselves? How do we maintain our humanity in the face of monstrous human evil? What do the findings of science say about our uniqueness as human beings? Anthropology: Seeking Light and Beauty offers a path through the many conflicting views of humanity, suggesting a fuller way of living as we try to follow the example of Jesus.
Social Science

Childhood Deployed

Author: Susan Shepler

Publisher: NYU Press

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 223

View: 877

Childhood Deployed examines the reintegration of former child soldiers in Sierra Leone. Based on eighteen months of participant-observer ethnographic fieldwork and ten years of follow-up research, the book argues that there is a fundamental disconnect between the Western idea of the child soldier and the individual lived experiences of the child soldiers of Sierra Leone. Susan Shepler contends that the reintegration of former child soldiers is a political process having to do with changing notions of childhood as one of the central structures of society. For most Westerners the tragedy of the idea of “child soldier” centers around perceptions of lost and violated innocence. In contrast, Shepler finds that for most Sierra Leoneans, the problem is not lost innocence but the horror of being separated from one’s family and the resulting generational break in youth education. Further, Shepler argues that Sierra Leonean former child soldiers find themselves forced to strategically perform (or refuse to perform) as the“child soldier” Western human rights initiatives expect in order to most effectively gain access to the resources available for their social reintegration. The strategies don’t always work—in some cases, Shepler finds, Western human rights initiatives do more harm than good. While this volume focuses on the well-known case of child soldiers in Sierra Leone, it speaks to the larger concerns of childhood studies with a detailed ethnography of people struggling over the situated meaning of the categories of childhood.It offers an example of the cultural politics of childhood in action, in which the very definition of childhood is at stake and an important site of political contestation.
Social Science

Mapping the Sociology of Health and Medicine

Author: F. Collyer

Publisher: Springer

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 325

View: 154

This book studies the sociology of health and medicine across three different countries, the USA, UK and Australia, examining the nature of disciplines and their specialties and posing sociological questions about the formation of intellectual fields and their social relations.
Political Science

Global Perspectives on the Politics of Multiculturalism in the 21st Century

Author: Fethi Mansouri

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Political Science

Page: 248

View: 962

Multiculturalism is now seen by many of its critics as the source of intercultural and social tensions, fostering communal segregation and social conflicts. While the cultural diversity of contemporary societies has to be acknowledged as an empirical and demographic fact, whether multiculturalism as a policy offers an optimal conduit for intercultural understanding and social harmony has become increasingly a matter of polarised public debate. ? This book examines the contested philosophical foundations of multiculturalism and its, often controversial, applications in the context of migrant societies. It also explores the current theoretical debates about the extent to which multiculturalism, and related conceptual constructs, can account for the various ethical challenges and policy dilemmas surrounding the management of cultural diversity in our contemporary societies. The authors consider common conceptual and empirical features from a transnational perspective through analysis of the case studies of Australia, Canada, Columbia, Germany, New Zealand, the United Kingdom and Uruguay. ? This book will be of interest to students and scholars of political science, comparative politics, international studies, multiculturalism, migration and political sociology.
Social Science

Global Migration

Author: K. Khory

Publisher: Springer

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 264

View: 851

Immigration today evokes passionate debates over questions of national identity, state sovereignty, and citizenship. Even as capital, goods, and services flow easily over national boundaries, human beings are subjected to intense scrutiny and resistance when crossing borders. In this collection of essays, distinguished scholars probe the challenges and opportunities that global migration presents for individuals, states, and societies grappling with questions of identity, belonging, and citizenship. Multidisciplinary in scope, the book demonstrates how forced and voluntary migrations intersect with global politics, from economic and environmental crises to human rights and security.