Social Science

Mapping Feminist Anthropology in the Twenty-First Century

Author: Ellen Lewin,Leni M. Silverstein

Publisher: Rutgers University Press

ISBN: 0813574307

Category: Social Science

Page: 310

View: 9550

Feminist anthropology emerged in the 1970s as a much-needed corrective to the discipline’s androcentric biases. Far from being a marginalized subfield, it has been at the forefront of developments that have revolutionized not only anthropology, but also a host of other disciplines. This landmark collection of essays provides a contemporary overview of feminist anthropology’s historical and theoretical origins, the transformations it has undergone, and the vital contributions it continues to make to cutting-edge scholarship. Mapping Feminist Anthropology in the Twenty-First Century brings together a variety of contributors, giving a voice to both younger researchers and pioneering scholars who offer insider perspectives on the field’s foundational moments. Some chapters reveal how the rise of feminist anthropology shaped—and was shaped by—the emergence of fields like women’s studies, black and Latina studies, and LGBTQ studies. Others consider how feminist anthropologists are helping to frame the direction of developing disciplines like masculinity studies, affect theory, and science and technology studies. Spanning the globe—from India to Canada, from Vietnam to Peru—Mapping Feminist Anthropology in the Twenty-First Century reveals the important role that feminist anthropologists have played in worldwide campaigns against human rights abuses, domestic violence, and environmental degradation. It also celebrates the work they have done closer to home, helping to explode the developed world’s preconceptions about sex, gender, and sexuality.
Social Science

Feminist Anthropology

Past, Present, and Future

Author: Pamela L. Geller,Miranda K. Stockett

Publisher: University of Pennsylvania Press

ISBN: 9780812220056

Category: Social Science

Page: 248

View: 6043

Feminist Anthropology probes critical issues in the study of gender, sex, and sexuality. While feminist anthropology is often perceived as fragmented, this vital new work establishes common ground and situates feminist inquiries within the larger context of social theory and anthropological practice.
Literary Criticism

Mappings

Feminism and the Cultural Geographies of Encounter

Author: Susan Stanford Friedman

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 9781400822577

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 360

View: 992

In this powerful work, Susan Friedman moves feminist theory out of paralyzing debates about us and them, white and other, first and third world, and victimizers and victims. Throughout, Friedman adapts current cultural theory from global and transnational studies, anthropology, and geography to challenge modes of thought that exaggerate the boundaries of gender, race, ethnicity, sexuality, class, and national origin. The author promotes a transnational and heterogeneous feminism, which, she maintains, can replace the proliferation of feminisms based on difference. She argues for a feminist geopolitical literacy that goes beyond fundamentalist identity politics and absolutist poststructuralist theory, and she continually focuses the reader's attention on those locations where differences are negotiated and transformed. Pervading the book is a concern with narrative: the way stories and cultural narratives serve as a primary mode of thinking about the politically explosive question of identity. Drawing freely on modernist novels, contemporary film, popular fiction, poetry, and mass media, the work features narratives of such writers and filmmakers as Gish Jen, Julie Dash, June Jordon, James Joyce, Gloria Anzald%a, Neil Jordon, Virginia Woolf, Mira Nair, Zora Neale Hurston, E. M. Forster, and Irena Klepfisz. Defending the pioneering role of academic feminists in the knowledge revolution, this work draws on a wide variety of twentieth-century cultural expressions to address theoretical issues in postmodern feminism.
Social Science

Women's Place in the Andes

Engaging Decolonial Feminist Anthropology

Author: Florence E. Babb

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 0520970411

Category: Social Science

Page: 304

View: 1651

In Women’s Place in the Andes Florence E. Babb draws on four decades of anthropological research to reexamine the complex interworkings of gender, race, and indigeneity in Peru and beyond. She deftly interweaves five new analytical chapters with six of her previously published works that exemplify currents in feminist anthropology and activism. Babb argues that decolonizing feminism and engaging more fully with interlocutors from the South will lead to a deeper understanding of the iconic Andean women who are subjects of both national pride and everyday scorn. This book’s novel approach goes on to set forth a collaborative methodology for rethinking gender and race in the Americas.
Social Science

Feminist Activist Ethnography

Counterpoints to Neoliberalism in North America

Author: Christa Craven,Dána-Ain Davis

Publisher: Lexington Books

ISBN: 0739176374

Category: Social Science

Page: 276

View: 9652

This collection reengages 20th century debates on feminist ethnography in a 21st century context. It serves as a critical dialog about the possibilities for feminist ethnography in the 21st century—at the intersection of engaged feminist research and collective activism. Contributors argue that feminist ethnography has much to offer contemporary debates over activist scholarship by posing feminist counter-visions to the overwhelmingly market-driven approach of neoliberal public policy efforts.
Social Science

Indigenous Cosmopolitans

Transnational and Transcultural Indigeneity in the Twenty-first Century

Author: Maximilian Christian Forte

Publisher: Peter Lang

ISBN: 9781433101021

Category: Social Science

Page: 223

View: 8174

"This collection takes the anthropological study of indiqeneity to an entirely new level. Bringing together an impressive range of case studies, from the Inult in the north to Aboriginal Australian In the south, the authors fundamentally challenge the assumptlon that that Indigeneity and transnationalism are separate and opposed conditions. They reveal with engaging ethnographic richness and historical depth that contemporary indigeneity is a rooted cosmopolitanism and that this indigeneity of roots and routes is being continually reinvented in ways that challenge conventional understandings, both within anthropology and in the wider public arena. This exploration of re-rooted cosmopolitanisms and remixed cosmopolitan indigeneities is also a major contribution to the anthropology of globalisation ... This theoretically sophisticated collection will be essential reading for anyone in the humanities and social sciences seeking to understand the nature of contemporary indigeneity."--Jeffrey Sissons, Associate Professor, Cultural Anthropology, School of Social and Cultural Studies, Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand; Author of First Peoples: Indigenous Cultures and Their Futures.
Social Science

Anthropology's World

Life in a Twenty-First Century Discipline

Author: Ulf Hannerz

Publisher: Pluto Press

ISBN: N.A

Category: Social Science

Page: 216

View: 6619

What, in these times, in is anthropology for? How do anthropologists want to be understood? For whom do they write, and in what language? And can we use anthropology's past as a resource for thinking about challenges past and future? In his new book, Ulf Hannerz cements his reputation as one of anthropology's finest writers, showing how anthropology came to be a central intellectual discipline and why it is vital that it remains so in an increasingly globalized world. "Anthropology's world" refers, on the one hand, to the discipline as a social world in itself, as a community stretching across national boundaries. It also refers to the wider outside world to which it must relate in various ways. This book deals with the world of anthropology through a broad and revealing historical analysis, questioning the way anthropologists approach their work now, and speculating how they will do so in the future. Turning the toolkit of the anthropologist upon the discipline itself and asking searching questions of the purpose, ethics and future of the subject, Anthropology's World will be required reading for all students and practitioners of anthropology.
Social Science

Anthropology and the Racial Politics of Culture

Author: Lee D. Baker

Publisher: Duke University Press

ISBN: 0822392690

Category: Social Science

Page: 292

View: 2182

In the late nineteenth century, if ethnologists in the United States recognized African American culture, they often perceived it as something to be overcome and left behind. At the same time, they were committed to salvaging “disappearing” Native American culture by curating objects, narrating practices, and recording languages. In Anthropology and the Racial Politics of Culture, Lee D. Baker examines theories of race and culture developed by American anthropologists during the late nineteenth century and early twentieth. He investigates the role that ethnologists played in creating a racial politics of culture in which Indians had a culture worthy of preservation and exhibition while African Americans did not. Baker argues that the concept of culture developed by ethnologists to understand American Indian languages and customs in the nineteenth century formed the basis of the anthropological concept of race eventually used to confront “the Negro problem” in the twentieth century. As he explores the implications of anthropology’s different approaches to African Americans and Native Americans, and the field’s different but overlapping theories of race and culture, Baker delves into the careers of prominent anthropologists and ethnologists, including James Mooney Jr., Frederic W. Putnam, Daniel G. Brinton, and Franz Boas. His analysis takes into account not only scientific societies, journals, museums, and universities, but also the development of sociology in the United States, African American and Native American activists and intellectuals, philanthropy, the media, and government entities from the Bureau of Indian Affairs to the Supreme Court. In Anthropology and the Racial Politics of Culture, Baker tells how anthropology has both responded to and helped shape ideas about race and culture in the United States, and how its ideas have been appropriated (and misappropriated) to wildly different ends.
Social Science

Territories of Difference

Place, Movements, Life, Redes

Author: Arturo Escobar

Publisher: Duke University Press

ISBN: 0822389436

Category: Social Science

Page: 455

View: 7263

In Territories of Difference, Arturo Escobar, author of the widely debated book Encountering Development, analyzes the politics of difference enacted by specific place-based ethnic and environmental movements in the context of neoliberal globalization. His analysis is based on his many years of engagement with a group of Afro-Colombian activists of Colombia’s Pacific rainforest region, the Proceso de Comunidades Negras (PCN). Escobar offers a detailed ethnographic account of PCN’s visions, strategies, and practices, and he chronicles and analyzes the movement’s struggles for autonomy, territory, justice, and cultural recognition. Yet he also does much more. Consistently emphasizing the value of local activist knowledge for both understanding and social action and drawing on multiple strands of critical scholarship, Escobar proposes new ways for scholars and activists to examine and apprehend the momentous, complex processes engulfing regions such as the Colombian Pacific today. Escobar illuminates many interrelated dynamics, including the Colombian government’s policies of development and pluralism that created conditions for the emergence of black and indigenous social movements and those movements’ efforts to steer the region in particular directions. He examines attempts by capitalists to appropriate the rainforest and extract resources, by developers to set the region on the path of modernist progress, and by biologists and others to defend this incredibly rich biodiversity “hot-spot” from the most predatory activities of capitalists and developers. He also looks at the attempts of academics, activists, and intellectuals to understand all of these complicated processes. Territories of Difference is Escobar’s effort to think with Afro-Colombian intellectual-activists who aim to move beyond the limits of Eurocentric paradigms as they confront the ravages of neoliberal globalization and seek to defend their place-based cultures and territories.
Social Science

Feminist Ethnography

Thinking through Methodologies, Challenges, and Possibilities

Author: Dána-Ain Davis,Christa Craven

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield

ISBN: 0759122466

Category: Social Science

Page: 218

View: 7331

A timely “problem-based” approach to the history and application of feminist ethnography, this text features over 25 Essentials (excerpts from key texts) and 25 Spotlights (interviews with contemporary feminist ethnographers) and is guided by critical questions about feminist methods as well as debates and challenges in the field.
Social Science

The Curious Feminist

Searching for Women in a New Age of Empire

Author: Cynthia Enloe

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 0520243811

Category: Social Science

Page: 367

View: 9841

Annotation This brings together much of Enloe's recent work, including her famous pieces on sneakers and feminism, as well as showcasing some new, unpublished pieces.
Social Science

Motherhood Lost

A Feminist Account of Pregnancy Loss in America

Author: Linda L. Layne

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1135222231

Category: Social Science

Page: 368

View: 2567

First Published in 2003. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.
Psychology

Techniques of Pleasure

BDSM and the Circuits of Sexuality

Author: Margot Weiss

Publisher: Duke University Press

ISBN: 0822351595

Category: Psychology

Page: 315

View: 9700

In this lively ethnography, Weiss studies the pansexual BDSM community in the San Francisco Bay Area. Weiss finds that BDSM practice is not as transgressive as the participants imagine, nor is it simply reinforcing of older forms of social domination. Instead she shows how fantasy play depends on pre-existing social hierarchies, even as it also participates in a commodification of desires.
Family & Relationships

Coming of Age in Samoa

A Psychological Study of Primitive Youth for Western Civilisation

Author: Margaret Mead

Publisher: HarperCollins

ISBN: 0062566091

Category: Family & Relationships

Page: 256

View: 6306

Rarely do science and literature come together in the same book. When they do -- as in Charles Darwin's On the Origin of Species, for example -- they become classics, quoted and studied by scholars and the general public alike. Margaret Mead accomplished this remarkable feat not once but several times, beginning with Coming of Age in Samoa. It details her historic journey to American Samoa, taken where she was just twenty-three, where she did her first fieldwork. Here, for the first time, she presented to the public the idea that the individual experience of developmental stages could be shaped by cultural demands and expectations. Adolescence, she wrote, might be more or less stormy, and sexual development more or less problematic in different cultures. The "civilized" world, she taught us had much to learn from the "primitive." Now this groundbreaking, beautifully written work as been reissued for the centennial of her birth, featuring introductions by Mary Pipher and by Mead's daughter, Mary Catherine Bateson.
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS

New Ecologies for the Twenty-First Century

Author: Associate Professor of Political Science Arun Agrawal

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9780822386421

Category: BUSINESS & ECONOMICS

Page: 345

View: 9447

Annotation In Kumaon in northern India, villagers set hundreds of forest fires in the early 1920s, protesting the colonial British state's regulations to protect the environment. Yet by the 1990s, they had begun to conserve their forests carefully. In his innovative historical and political study, Arun Agrawal analyzes this striking transformation. He describes and explains the emergence of environmental identities and changes in state-locality relations and shows how the two are related. In so doing, he demonstrates that scholarship on common property, political ecology, and feminist environmentalism can be combined--in an approach he calls environmentality--to better understand changes in conservation efforts. Such an understanding is relevant far beyond Kumaon: local populations in more than fifty countries are engaged in similar efforts to protect their environmental resources.Agrawal brings environment and development studies, new institutional economics, and Foucauldian theories of power and subjectivity to bear on his ethnographical and historical research. He visited nearly forty villages in Kumaon, where he assessed the state of village forests, interviewed hundreds of Kumaonis, and examined local records. Drawing on his extensive fieldwork and archival research, he shows how decentralization strategies change relations between states and localities, community decision makers and common residents, and individuals and the environment. In exploring these changes and their significance, Agrawal establishes that theories of environmental politics are enriched by attention to the interconnections between power, knowledge, institutions, and subjectivities.
Social Science

Testing Women, Testing the Fetus

The Social Impact of Amniocentesis in America

Author: Rayna Rapp

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1135963924

Category: Social Science

Page: 376

View: 1501

Rich with the voices and stories of participants, these touching, firsthand accounts examine how women of diverse racial, ethnic, class and religious backgrounds perceive prenatal testing, the most prevalent and routinized of the new reproducing technologies. Based on the author's decade of research and her own personal experiences with amniocentesis, Testing Women, Testing the Fetus explores the "geneticization" of family life in all its complexity and diversity.
Social Science

Looking for Chengdu

A Woman's Adventures in China

Author: Hill Gates

Publisher: Cornell University Press

ISBN: 9780801486326

Category: Social Science

Page: 246

View: 9459

For decades, anthropologist Hill Gates had waited for an opportunity to get to know the citizens of China as she had done in Taiwan—face to face, over an extended period of time. At last in the late 1980s she set out on an excursion to Sichuan Province. That visit was the first of many she would make there on a remarkable double adventure: to gain a deeper understanding of Chinese women and to complete a difficult passage in her own life. Looking for Chengdu is her memoir of these trips. By turns analytic, witty, and bittersweet, Gates's observations on contemporary China are enlivened by a keen eye for the oddities of human behavior, including her own.The vast, inland province of Sichuan was the birthplace of the Chinese economic reforms of the 1970s, and is now speeding from the sixteenth to the twenty-first century. Was its economic boom transforming women's lives, Gates wondered? After a generation of socialist rule, would women risk the challenge of entrepreneurship? A feminist, she was especially curious to learn what Chinese of both sexes defined as women's rights.Gates traveled—by boat, train, bus, car, bicycle, and foot (her preference)—across the spectacular countryside, gleaning insight into China's massive bureaucracies from her experiences on an obligatory vacation, in a Tibetan dance-hall, and at a shouting match in her Chengdu home. She met dozens of hard-working, stylish women running family firms, and crossed paths with scholars and sailors. Her book is rich in anecdotes and compelling moments, from her journey through mountain villages in search of five thousand women with bound feet to low-voiced conversations about the Chengdu equivalent of the events at Tiananmen Square.A fascinating glimpse into the deeply personal vocation of anthropology, Gates's memoir will change the way readers think about the Chinese people.
History

What is Cultural History?

Author: Peter Burke

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 0745658679

Category: History

Page: 192

View: 7286

What is Cultural History? has established itself as an essential guide to what cultural historians do and how they do it. Now fully updated in its second edition, leading historian Peter Burke offers afresh his accessible guide to the past, present and future of cultural history, as it has been practised not only in the English-speaking world, but also in Continental Europe, Asia, South America and elsewhere. Burke begins by providing a discussion of the ‘classic’ phase of cultural history, associated with Jacob Burckhardt and Johan Huizinga, and of the Marxist reaction, from Frederick Antal to Edward Thompson. He then charts the rise of cultural history in more recent times, concentrating on the work of the last generation, often described as the ‘New Cultural History'. He places cultural history in its own cultural context, noting links between new approaches to historical thought and writing and the rise of feminism, postcolonial studies and an everyday discourse in which the idea of culture plays an increasingly important part. The new edition also surveys the very latest developments in the field and considers the directions cultural history may be taking in the twenty-first century. The second edition of What is Cultural History? will continue to be an essential textbook for all students of history as well as those taking courses in cultural, anthropological and literary studies.
Social Science

On the Courthouse Lawn

Confronting the Legacy of Lynching in the Twenty-first Century

Author: Sherrilyn Ifill

Publisher: Beacon Press

ISBN: 0807009903

Category: Social Science

Page: 224

View: 3354

Nearly 5,000 black Americans were lynched between 1890 and 1960. Over forty years later, Sherrilyn Ifill's On the Courthouse Lawn examines the numerous ways that this racial trauma still resounds across the United States. While the lynchings and their immediate aftermath were devastating, the little-known contemporary consequences, such as the marginalization of political and economic development for black Americans, are equally pernicious. On the Courthouse Lawn investigates how the lynchings implicated average white citizens, some of whom actively participated in the violence while many others witnessed the lynchings but did nothing to stop them. Ifill observes that this history of complicity has become embedded in the social and cultural fabric of local communities, who either supported, condoned, or ignored the violence. She traces the lingering effects of two lynchings in Maryland to illustrate how ubiquitous this history is and issues a clarion call for American communities with histories of racial violence to be proactive in facing this legacy today. Inspired by South Africa's Truth and Reconciliation Commission, as well as by techniques of restorative justice, Ifill provides concrete ideas to help communities heal, including placing gravestones on the unmarked burial sites of lynching victims, issuing public apologies, establishing mandatory school programs on the local history of lynching, financially compensating those whose family homes or businesses were destroyed in the aftermath of lynching, and creating commemorative public spaces. Because the contemporary effects of racial violence are experienced most intensely in local communities, Ifill argues that reconciliation and reparation efforts must also be locally based in order to bring both black and white Americans together in an efficacious dialogue. A landmark book, On the Courthouse Lawn is a much-needed and urgent road map for communities finally confronting lynching's long shadow by embracing pragmatic reconciliation and reparation efforts.