Science

Molecular Gastronomy

Exploring the Science of Flavor

Author: Hervé This

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN: 9780231133128

Category: Science

Page: 377

View: 4226

Bringing the instruments and experimental techniques of the laboratory into the kitchen, Herve This uses recent research in the chemistry, physics, and biology of food to challenge traditional ideas about cooking and eating. What he discovers will entertain, instruct, and intrigue cooks, gourmets, and scientists alike. Molecular Gastronomy, This's first work to appear in English, is filled with practical tips, provocative suggestions, and penetrating insights. This begins by reexamining and debunking a variety of time-honored rules and dictums about cooking and presents new and improved ways of preparing a variety of dishes from quiches and quenelles to steak and hard-boiled eggs. He goes on to discuss the physiology of flavor and explores how the brain perceives tastes, how chewing affects food, and how the tongue reacts to various stimuli. Examining the molecular properties of bread, ham, foie gras, and champagne, the book analyzes what happens as they are baked, cured, cooked, and chilled.
Cooking

Building a Meal

From Molecular Gastronomy to Culinary Constructivism

Author: Hervé This

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN: 9780231144667

Category: Cooking

Page: 135

View: 341

Considering six bistro favorites, Hervâe This isolates the exact chemical properties that tickle our senses and stimulate our appetites. More important, he identifies methods of culinary construction that appeal to our memories, intelligence, and creativity.
Cooking

Kitchen Mysteries

Revealing the Science of Cooking

Author: Hervé This,Jody Gladding

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN: 0231141718

Category: Cooking

Page: 220

View: 9432

Looks at the science behind everyday cooking with information on molecular gastronomy, the physiology of taste, basic components of meals, the use of tenderizing enzymes and gelatins, and covers the effects of boiling, steaming, braising, roasting, grilling, and microwaving.
Cooking

The Science of the Oven

Author: Hervé This

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN: 0231147066

Category: Cooking

Page: 206

View: 5462

Mayonnaise "takes" when a series of liquids form a semisolid consistency. Eggs, a liquid, become solid as they are heated, whereas, under the same conditions, solids melt. When meat is roasted, its surface browns and it acquires taste and texture. What accounts for these extraordinary transformations? The answer: chemistry and physics. With his trademark eloquence and wit, Hervé This launches a wry investigation into the chemical art of cooking. Unraveling the science behind common culinary technique and practice, Hervé This breaks food down to its molecular components and matches them to cooking's chemical reactions. He translates the complex processes of the oven into everyday knowledge for professional chefs and casual cooks, and he demystifies the meaning of taste and the making of flavor. He describes the properties of liquids, salts, sugars, oils, and fats and defines the principles of culinary practice, which endow food with sensual as well as nutritional value. For fans of Hervé This's popular volumes and for those new to his celebrated approach, The Science of the Oven expertly expands the possibilities of the kitchen, fusing the physiology of taste with the molecular structure of bodies and food.
Cooking

Cooking

The Quintessential Art

Author: Hervé This,Pierre Gagnaire

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 9780520942127

Category: Cooking

Page: 366

View: 6578

From its intriguing opening question—"How can we reasonably judge a meal?"—to its rewarding conclusion, this beautiful book picks up where Brillat-Savarin left off almost two centuries ago. Hervé This, a cofounder (with the late physicist Nicholas Kurti) of the new approach to studying the scientific basis of cooking known as molecular gastronomy, investigates the question of culinary beauty in a series of playful, lively, and erudite dialogues. Considering the place of cuisine in Western culture, This explores an astonishing variety of topics and elaborates a revolutionary method for judging the art of cooking. Many of the ideas he introduces in this culinary romance are illustrated by dishes created by Pierre Gagnaire, whose engaging commentaries provide rare insights into the creative inspiration of one of the world's foremost chefs. The result is an enthralling, sophisticated, freewheeling dinner party of a book that also makes a powerful case for openness and change in the way we think about food.
Science

Note-by-Note Cooking

The Future of Food

Author: Hervé This

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN: 0231538235

Category: Science

Page: 272

View: 4907

Note-by-Note Cooking is a landmark in the annals of gastronomy, liberating cooks from the constraints of traditional ingredients and methods through the use of pure molecular compounds. 1-Octen-3-ol, which has a scent of wild mushrooms; limonene, a colorless liquid hydrocarbon that has the smell of citrus; sotolon, whose fragrance at high concentrations resembles curry and at low concentrations, maple syrup or sugar; tyrosine, an odorless but flavorful amino acid present in cheese—these and many other substances, some occurring in nature, some synthesized in the laboratory, make it possible to create novel tastes and flavors in the same way that elementary sound waves can be combined to create new sounds. Note-by-note cooking promises to add unadulterated nutritional value to dishes of all kinds, actually improving upon the health benefits of so-called natural foods. Cooking with molecular compounds will be far more energy efficient and environmentally sustainable than traditional techniques of cooking. This new way of thinking about food heralds a phase of culinary evolution on which the long-term survival of a growing human population depends. Hervé This clearly explains the properties of naturally occurring and synthesized compounds, dispels a host of misconceptions about the place of chemistry in cooking, and shows why note-by-note cooking is an obvious—and inevitable—extension of his earlier pioneering work in molecular gastronomy. An appendix contains a representative selection of recipes, vividly illustrated in color.
Cooking

The Kitchen as Laboratory

Reflections on the Science of Food and Cooking

Author: César Vega,Job Ubbink,Erik van der Linden

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN: 023152692X

Category: Cooking

Page: 336

View: 5702

Eating is a multisensory experience, yet chefs and scientists have only recently begun to deconstruct food's components, setting the stage for science-based cooking. In this global collaboration of essays, chefs and scientists advance culinary knowledge by testing hypotheses rooted in the physical and chemical properties of food. Using traditional and cutting-edge tools, ingredients, and techniques, these pioneers create, and sometimes revamp, dishes that respond to specific desires and serve up an original encounter with gastronomic practice. From the seemingly mundane to the food fantastic—from grilled cheese sandwiches, pizzas, and soft-boiled eggs to Turkish ice cream, sugar glasses, and jellified beads—the essays in The Kitchen as Laboratory cover a range of creations and their history and culture. They consider the significance of an eater's background and dining atmosphere and the importance of a chef's methods, as well as the strategies used to create a great diversity of foods and dishes. This collection will delight experts and amateurs alike, especially as restaurants rely more on science-based cooking and recreational cooks increasingly explore the physics and chemistry behind their art. Contributors end each essay with their personal thoughts on food, cooking, and science, offering rare insight into a professional's passion for playing with food.
Cooking

Italian Cuisine

A Cultural History

Author: Alberto Capatti,Massimo Montanari

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN: 0231509049

Category: Cooking

Page: 400

View: 7824

Italy, the country with a hundred cities and a thousand bell towers, is also the country with a hundred cuisines and a thousand recipes. Its great variety of culinary practices reflects a history long dominated by regionalism and political division, and has led to the common conception of Italian food as a mosaic of regional customs rather than a single tradition. Nonetheless, this magnificent new book demonstrates the development of a distinctive, unified culinary tradition throughout the Italian peninsula. Alberto Capatti and Massimo Montanari uncover a network of culinary customs, food lore, and cooking practices, dating back as far as the Middle Ages, that are identifiably Italian: o Italians used forks 300 years before other Europeans, possibly because they were needed to handle pasta, which is slippery and dangerously hot. o Italians invented the practice of chilling drinks and may have invented ice cream. o Italian culinary practice influenced the rest of Europe to place more emphasis on vegetables and less on meat. o Salad was a distinctive aspect of the Italian meal as early as the sixteenth century. The authors focus on culinary developments in the late medieval, Renaissance, and Baroque eras, aided by a wealth of cookbooks produced throughout the early modern period. They show how Italy's culinary identities emerged over the course of the centuries through an exchange of information and techniques among geographical regions and social classes. Though temporally, spatially, and socially diverse, these cuisines refer to a common experience that can be described as Italian. Thematically organized around key issues in culinary history and beautifully illustrated, Italian Cuisine is a rich history of the ingredients, dishes, techniques, and social customs behind the Italian food we know and love today.
Science

Neurogastronomy

How the Brain Creates Flavor and Why It Matters

Author: Gordon Shepherd

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN: 0231159110

Category: Science

Page: 288

View: 2820

Challenging the belief that the sense of smell diminished during human evolution, Shepherd argues that this sense, which constitutes the main component of flavor, is far more powerful and essential than previously believed. --from publisher description
Molecular gastronomy

Molecular Gastronomy at Home

Taking Culinary Physics Out of the Lab and Into Your Kitchen

Author: Jozef Youssef

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9780228100362

Category: Molecular gastronomy

Page: 256

View: 8695

"This book embodies the ultimate crash course for the amateur chef and home cook in preparing food using modern scientific principles... For a reader seeking new and broader culinary horizons just come armed with a dash of patience and a pinch of scientific interest -- the results ought to be astounding." -- Publishers Weekly At one time revolutionary and the sole purview of dedicated expert chefs, molecular gastronomy is well established as a cuisine choice. Food aficionados who want to create it at home can now find equipment and locate the catalyst ingredients, but it's neither a bargain method of cooking nor a quick study. This book shows the most common methods used in molecular gastronomy adapted for the home. Clear and easy-to-follow step-by-step photographs demonstrate each technique so that cooks can practice the unique skills, handle the unusual ingredients and plate the dishes. Most beneficial to home cooks, however, is that should special equipment be unavailable, the author recommends the closest domestic equivalents. Molecular Gastronomy at Home is an outstanding practical introduction to a fascinating and delicious cooking method. It demonstrates how with clear technical guidance, numerous illustrations, achievable recipes and a generous dose of patience, home cooks can take culinary physics out of the lab and into their home kitchen. With the first edition of Molecular Gastronomy at Home sold out, this second edition will be available for a wider audience of cooks who like to explore and learn new skills.
Cooking

Slow Food

The Case for Taste

Author: Carlo Petrini

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN: 0231128452

Category: Cooking

Page: 176

View: 7097

Discusses the history and spread of the International Slow Food Movement which was sparked in 1986 when Carlo Petrini organized a protest against plans to build a McDonald's fast food restaurant near the Spanish Steps in Rome, and discusses the movement's goals of preserving indigenous foods and eating traditions, and returning to dining as a social event.
Cooking

Mouthfeel

How Texture Makes Taste

Author: Ole Mouritsen,Klavs Styrbæk

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN: 0231543247

Category: Cooking

Page: 416

View: 5069

Why is chocolate melting on the tongue such a decadent sensation? Why do we love crunching on bacon? Why is fizz-less soda such a disappointment to drink, and why is flat beer so unappealing to the palate? Our sense of taste produces physical and emotional reactions that cannot be explained by chemical components alone. Eating triggers our imagination, draws on our powers of recall, and activates our critical judgment, creating a unique impression in our mouths and our minds. How exactly does this alchemy work, and what are the larger cultural and environmental implications? Collaborating in the laboratory and the kitchen, Ole G. Mouritsen and Klavs Styrbæk investigate the multiple ways in which food texture influences taste. Combining scientific analysis with creative intuition and a sophisticated knowledge of food preparation, they write a one-of-a-kind book for food lovers and food science scholars. By mapping the mechanics of mouthfeel, Mouritsen and Styrbæk advance a greater awareness of its link to our culinary preferences. Gaining insight into the textural properties of raw vegetables, puffed rice, bouillon, or ice cream can help us make healthier and more sustainable food choices. Through mouthfeel, we can recreate the physical feelings of foods we love with other ingredients or learn to latch onto smarter food options. Mastering texture also leads to more adventurous gastronomic experiments in the kitchen, allowing us to reach even greater heights of taste sensation.
Cooking

French Gastronomy

The History and Geography of a Passion

Author: Jean-Robert Pitte

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN: 0231518463

Category: Cooking

Page: 176

View: 4374

This we can be sure of: when a restaurant in the western world is famous for its cooking, it is the tricolor flag that hangs above the stove, opined one French magazine, and this is by no means an isolated example of such crowing. Indeed, both linguistically and conceptually, the restaurant itself is a French creation. Why are the French recognized by themselves and others the world over as the most enlightened of eaters, as the great gourmets? Why did the passion for food—gastronomy—originate in France? In French Gastronomy, geographer and food lover Jean-Robert Pitte uncovers a novel answer. The key, it turns out, is France herself. In her climate, diversity of soils, abundant resources, and varied topography lie the roots of France's food fame. Pitte masterfully reveals the ways in which cultural phenomena surrounding food and eating in France relate to space and place. He points out that France has some six hundred regions, or microclimates, that allow different agricultures, to flourish, and fully navigable river systems leading from peripheral farmlands directly to markets in the great gastronomic centers of Paris and Lyon. With an eye to this landscape, Pitte wonders: Would the great French burgundies enjoy such prestige if the coast they came from were not situated close to the ancient capital for the dukes and a major travel route for medieval Europe? Yet for all the shaping influence of earth and climate, Pitte demonstrates that haute cuisine, like so much that is great about France, can be traced back to the court of Louis XIV. It was the Sun King's regal gourmandise—he enacted a nightly theater of eating, dining alone but in full view of the court—that made food and fine dining a central affair of state. The Catholic Church figures prominently as well: gluttony was regarded as a "benign sin" in France, and eating well was associated with praising God, fraternal conviviality, and a respect for the body. These cultural ingredients, in combination with the bounties of the land, contributed to the full flowering of French foodways. This is a time of paradox for French gourmandism. Never has there been so much literature published on the subject of culinary creativity, never has there been so much talk about good food, and never has so little cooking been done at home. Each day new fast-food places open. Will French cuisine lose its charm and its soul? Will discourse become a substitute for reality? French Gastronomy is a delightful celebration of what makes France unique, and a call to everyone who loves French food to rediscover its full flavor.
Cooking

Eating History

30 Turning Points in the Making of American Cuisine

Author: Andrew F. Smith

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN: 0231140932

Category: Cooking

Page: 376

View: 4810

Food expert and celebrated food historian Andrew F. Smith recounts--in delicious detail--the creation of contemporary American cuisine. The diet of the modern American wasn't always as corporate, conglomerated, and corn-rich as it is today, and the style of American cooking, along with the ingredients that compose it, has never been fixed. With a cast of characters including bold inventors, savvy restaurateurs, ruthless advertisers, mad scientists, adventurous entrepreneurs, celebrity chefs, and relentless health nuts, Smith pins down the truly crackerjack history behind the way America eats. Smith's story opens with early America, an agriculturally independent nation where most citizens grew and consumed their own food. Over the next two hundred years, however, Americans would cultivate an entirely different approach to crops and consumption. Advances in food processing, transportation, regulation, nutrition, and science introduced highly complex and mechanized methods of production. The proliferation of cookbooks, cooking shows, and professionally designed kitchens made meals more commercially, politically, and culturally potent. To better understand these trends, Smith delves deeply and humorously into their creation. Ultimately he shows how, by revisiting this history, we can reclaim the independent, locally sustainable roots of American food.
Cooking

Medieval Tastes

Food, Cooking, and the Table

Author: Massimo Montanari

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN: 0231539088

Category: Cooking

Page: 288

View: 2968

In his new history of food, acclaimed historian Massimo Montanari traces the development of medieval tastes—both culinary and cultural—from raw materials to market and captures their reflections in today's food trends. Tying the ingredients of our diet evolution to the growth of human civilization, he immerses readers in the passionate debates and bold inventions that transformed food from a simple staple to a potent factor in health and a symbol of social and ideological standing. Montanari returns to the prestigious Salerno school of medicine, the "mother of all medical schools," to plot the theory of food that took shape in the twelfth century. He reviews the influence of the Near Eastern spice routes, which introduced new flavors and cooking techniques to European kitchens, and reads Europe's earliest cookbooks, which took cues from old Roman practices that valued artifice and mixed flavors. Dishes were largely low-fat, and meats and fish were seasoned with vinegar, citrus juices, and wine. He highlights other dishes, habits, and battles that mirror contemporary culinary identity, including the refinement of pasta, polenta, bread, and other flour-based foods; the transition to more advanced cooking tools and formal dining implements; the controversy over cooking with oil, lard, or butter; dietary regimens; and the consumption and cultural meaning of water and wine. As people became more cognizant of their physicality, individuality, and place in the cosmos, Montanari shows, they adopted a new attitude toward food, investing as much in its pleasure and possibilities as in its acquisition.
Cooking

Umami

Unlocking the Secrets of the Fifth Taste

Author: Ole Mouritsen,Klavs Styrbæk

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN: 0231537581

Category: Cooking

Page: 280

View: 7693

In the West, we have identified only four basic tastes—sour, sweet, salty, and bitter—that, through skillful combination and technique, create delicious foods. Yet in many parts of East Asia over the past century, an additional flavor has entered the culinary lexicon: umami, a fifth taste impression that is savory, complex, and wholly distinct. Combining culinary history with recent research into the chemistry, preparation, nutrition, and culture of food, Mouritsen and Styrbæk encapsulate what we know to date about the concept of umami, from ancient times to today. Umami can be found in soup stocks, meat dishes, air-dried ham, shellfish, aged cheeses, mushrooms, and ripe tomatoes, and it can enhance other taste substances to produce a transformative gustatory experience. Researchers have also discovered which substances in foodstuffs bring out umami, a breakthrough that allows any casual cook to prepare delicious and more nutritious meals with less fat, salt, and sugar. The implications of harnessing umami are both sensuous and social, enabling us to become more intimate with the subtleties of human taste while making better food choices for ourselves and our families. This volume, the product of an ongoing collaboration between a chef and a scientist, won the Danish national Mad+Medier-Prisen (Food and Media Award) in the category of academic food communication.
Business & Economics

The Routledge Handbook of Sustainable Food and Gastronomy

Author: Philip Sloan,Willy Legrand,Clare Hindley

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1134457332

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 426

View: 5398

The issues surrounding the provision, preparation and development of food products is fundamental to every human being on the planet. Given the scarcity of agricultural land, environmental pollution, climate change and the exponential growth of the world’s population where starvation and obesity are both widespread it is little wonder that exploring the frontiers of food is now a major focus for researchers and practitioners. This timely Handbook provides a systematic guide to the current state of knowledge on sustainable food. It begins by analyzing the historical development surrounding food production and consumption, then moves on to discuss the current food crisis and challenges as well as the impacts linked to modern agriculture and food security. Finally, it concludes with a section that examines emerging sustainable food trends and movements in addition to an analysis of current food science innovations. Developed from specifically commissioned original contributions the Handbook’s inherent multidisciplinary approach paves the way for deeper understanding of all aspects linked to the evolution of food in society, including insights into local food, food and tourism, organic food, indigenous and traditional food, sustainable restaurant practices, consumption patterns and sourcing. This book is essential reading for students, researches and academics interested in the possibilities of sustainable forms of gastronomy and gastronomy’s contribution to sustainable development. The title includes a foreword written by Roberto Flore, Head Chef at the Nordic Food Lab, Copenhagen, Denmark.
Cooking

Food

A Culinary History

Author: Jean-Louis Flandrin,Massimo Montanari

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN: 023111155X

Category: Cooking

Page: 624

View: 7978

Food and drink.
Cooking

The Land of the Five Flavors

A Cultural History of Chinese Cuisine

Author: Thomas O. Hšllmann

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN: 0231161867

Category: Cooking

Page: 304

View: 9604

Translation of: Schlafender Lotos, trunkenes Huhn.
Cooking

Modernist Cooking Made Easy: Getting Started

An Introduction to the Techniques, Ingredients and Recipes of Molecular Gastronomy

Author: Jason Logsdon

Publisher: Createspace Independent Pub

ISBN: 9781481063319

Category: Cooking

Page: 242

View: 9265

Are you interested in molecular gastronomy and modernist cooking but can't find any accessible information for getting started? Are you looking for an easy to understand introduction to the techniques, ingredients, and recipes of modernist cooking? If you nodded your head "Yes" then this book was written for you! Modernist cooking is quickly gaining popularity in high end restaurants and working its way into home kitchens. However, there has been very little accessible information about the techniques and ingredients used. This book aims to change that by presenting all the information you need to get to get started with modernist cooking and molecular gastronomy. It is all presented in an easy to understand format, along with more than 80 example recipes, that can be applied immediately in your kitchen. Modernist Cooking Made Easy: Getting Started covers popular modernist techniques like foams, gels, and spherification as well as many of the ingredients including agar, xanthan gum, and sodium alginate. There are also more than 80 high quality, black and white photographs providing a visual look at many of the recipes and techniques. What You Get in This Book: An in-depth look at many of the most popular modernist ingredients such as xanthan gum, sodium alginate, carrageenan, and agar agar. A detailed exploration of modernist techniques like spherification, gelling, foaming, thickening, and sous vide. More than 80 recipes for gels, foams, sauces, caviars, airs, syrups, gel noodles and marshmallows. Directions for how to use modernist techniques and ingredients to make your everyday cooking more convenient. More than 400 sous vide time and temperature combinations across 175 cuts of meat, types of fish and vegetables. If you want to get started with modernist cooking then this is the book for you!