Nature

Monitoring Rocky Shores

Author: Steven N. Murray

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN:

Category: Nature

Page: 240

View: 819

Monitoring changes in the intertidal zone of rocky shores has never been more critical. This sensitive habitat at the interface of land and ocean may well be the marine equivalent of the canary in a coal mine as we advance into an era of global climate change. This handbook describes effective methods and procedures for monitoring the ecological and environmental status of these areas. Written by three collaborating authors with extensive field experience, it provides critical discussions and evaluation of the various sampling techniques and field procedures for studies of intertidal macroinvertebrates, seaweeds, and seagrasses. Rather than prescribing standard protocols or procedures, the authors break down the decision-making process into various elements so investigators can become aware of the advantages and disadvantages of choosing a particular method or approach. Chapters discuss topics such as site selection, field sampling layouts and designs, selection of sampling units, nondestructive and destructive methods of quantifying abundance, and methods for measuring age, growth rates, size, structure, and reproductive condition.
Nature

Encyclopedia of Tidepools and Rocky Shores

Author: Mark W. Denny

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN:

Category: Nature

Page: 705

View: 523

"This is the book I have been waiting for! Written by experts in each field, this encyclopedia provides a wealth of information not only about the tidepool and shore life but also the oceanography associated with these habitats. This will be a major reference guide for years to come."--Dr. Nigella Hillgarth, Executive Director, Birch Aquarium at Scripps, Scripps Institution of Oceanography "The "Encyclopedia of Tidepools and Rocky Shores" covers much more than one might guess. It ranges from oceanography, to physiology, biomechanics, and conservation science, along with the expected treatment of the diverse groups of organisms that live in those habitats. The coverage of each topic is kept short and comprehensible to almost everyone, from high schools to colleges, and certainly to the general public interested in learning more about this fascinating part of our natural world. Best of all, the editors have managed to get some of the best scientists in the world, the absolute experts in their fields, to write the articles. The relatively short length of each entry also makes this book an ideal source for assigned readings to accompany marine biology, ecology, or oceanography classes, laboratories and field trips. It will be much appreciated by teachers and students."--Ken Sebens, Director of the Friday Harbor Marine Laboratories, University of Washington "The place where vast oceans meet the land is wondrous, complex and fascinating. Visitors from research scientists to toddlers have explored these ecosystems--one of nature's most popular theme parks. Anyone who has spent time amongst the sea stars, crabs and kelp departs full of unanswered questions. Now these questions can be answered by dipping into the "Encyclopedia of Tidepools and Rocky Shores." The editors and contributors to this reference have created a new standard that will be an immediate classic."--Leon Panetta, Director, The Leon & Sylvia Panetta Institute for Public Policy "This volume is a wonderful introduction to the hidden and fascinating world of rocky tidepools. Grab a copy and head out with your kids or students for an outdoor experience that's sure to get them hooked. From remarkable adaptations of marine algae to weird animal life histories, tidepools hold amazing stories to tell. They deserve our interest--and our care--as part of earth's natural systems that sustain us all."--Julie Packard, Executive Director, Monterey Bay Aquarium "Tide pool lovers the world around will satisfy their curiosity, uncover new gems of insight and renew their wonder of nature at lands' end in this authoritative, fascinating and insightful compilation. Revealed within are the secrets of rocky shores and tide pools--that most dynamic of interfaces between the land and the sea, that treasure chest of rich biodiversity and keen insight, that world where science, literature, beauty and stewardship combine to form the now that integrates the past and tempts the future."--Jane Lubchenco, Oregon State University
Science

Fate and Effects of Oil in Marine Ecosystems

Author: J. Kuiper

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN:

Category: Science

Page: 338

View: 691

A. Rorsch Member of the TNO Board of Management Like all living creatures man has from the very outset influenced the environment. Initially, the traces of human activity were hardly noticeable and so were their effects on the equilibrium of the ecosystem as such. However, as soon as man learned how to use tools, he was able to influence his surroundings more drastically, and to proliferate more rapidly. As a matter of fact that is the time when things went wrong, because a process was started off which was to continue with ever-increasing speed and on an ever increasing scale. The present condition of nature as a result of the activities of mankind is generally known. Whether it is an accident with a nuclear plant or the vanishing of tropical rain forests, acid deposition or the pollution of soil, water and air, environmental disasters almost seem to be the order of the day. It is striking that with all these - more or less arbitrary - examples the provision of energy plays a role. In this respect one can add an even more important energy carrier to the list, namely: crude oil.
Science

Intertidal Ecology

Author: David Raffaelli

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN:

Category: Science

Page: 356

View: 167

The seashore has long been the subject of fascination and study - the Ancient Greek scholar Aristotle made observations and wrote about Mediterranean sea urchins. The considerable knowledge of what to eat and where it could be found has been passed down since prehistoric times by oral tradition in many societies - in Britain it is still unwise to eat shellfish in months without an 'r' in them. Over the last three hundred years or so we have seen the formalization of science and this of course has touched intertidal ecology. Linnaeus classified specimens collected from the seashore and many common species (Patella vulgata L. , Mytilus edulis L. , Littorina littorea (L. )) bear his imprint because he formally described, named and catalogued them. Early natural historians described zonation patterns in the first part of the 19th century (Audouin and Milne-Edwards, 1832), and the Victorians became avid admirers and collectors of shore animals and plants with the advent of the new fashion of seaside holidays (Gosse, 1856; Kingsley, 1856). As science became professionalized towards the end of the century, marine biologists took advantage of low tides to gain easy access to marine life for taxonomic work and classical studies of functional morphology. The first serious studies of the ecology of the shore were made at this time (e. g.
Coastal plants

Rocky Shores

Author: Stephen J. Hawkins

Publisher: Sea Challengers

ISBN:

Category: Coastal plants

Page: 144

View: 858

Marine biology

Annual Report

Author: Marine Biological Station at Port Erin, Isle of Man

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Marine biology

Page:

View: 403