History

Murder in Mississippi

United States v. Price and the struggle for civil rights

Author: Howard Ball

Publisher: Univ Pr of Kansas

ISBN: N.A

Category: History

Page: 171

View: 816

Few episodes in the modern civil rights movement were more galvanizing than the 1964 brutal murders of Michael Schwerner, Andrew Goodman, and James Chaney. As we approach the 40th anniversary of the murders in June 2004, "Murder in Mississippi" provides a timely and telling reminder of the vigilance democracy requires if its ideals are to be fully realized.
Civil rights workers

Three Lives for Mississippi

Author: William Bradford Huie

Publisher: Univ. Press of Mississippi

ISBN: 9781604736953

Category: Civil rights workers

Page: 254

View: 4269

History

Justice in Mississippi

The Murder Trial of Edgar Ray Killen

Author: Howard Ball

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: History

Page: 254

View: 7069

The compelling real-life story of the criminal investigation, indictment, and trial of Edgar Ray Killen, the preacher and former Ku Klux Klansman finally convicted in June 2005 for the deaths of three civil rights workers--forty-one years after their brutal murders. A stunning final chapter to the case immortalized in the movie Mississippi Burning.
Biography & Autobiography

Witness in Philadelphia

Author: Florence Mars,Lynn Eden

Publisher: LSU Press

ISBN: 9780807115664

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 296

View: 8887

The account of the author's life during the three and a half years following the killing of three civil-rights workers in Mississippi.
History

We Are Not Afraid

The Story of Goodman, Schwerner, and Chaney, and the Civil Rights Campaign for Mississippi

Author: Seth Cagin,Philip Dray

Publisher: Nation Books

ISBN: 9781560258643

Category: History

Page: 500

View: 9682

We Are Not Afraid is the story of the 1964 killing of James Chaney, Andrew Goodman, and Michael Schwerner in Philadelphia, Mississippi, at the hands of Ku Klux Klansmen and the local cops. Described as "one of the best books on the civil rights movement," the murders it describes inspired the acclaimed film, Mississippi Burning. The events surrounding this seminal event have re-entered public debate due to the recent conviction of manslaughter by Klansman and Imperial Wizard, Edgar Ray Killen, for his part in orchestrating the murders. As America struggles to honestly confront its history of racism, there has never been a more timely moment to reissue this fully updated edition of We Are Not Afraid. From the roles played by such figures as Martin Luther King, Jr. and Robert Kennedy to the remarkable courage of the Freedom Riders, this book relates the definitive story of a nation's ongoing battle for true democracy.
Fiction

Mississippi Burning

Author: Kirk Mitchell,Joel Norst

Publisher: Signet

ISBN: 9780451160492

Category: Fiction

Page: 255

View: 7825

Social Science

The Price of Defiance

James Meredith and the Integration of Ole Miss

Author: Charles W. Eagles

Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press

ISBN: 0807832731

Category: Social Science

Page: 560

View: 4712

Presents the history of the efforts to integrate the University of Mississippi, describing James Meredith's struggles to become its first African-American student and the conflict between segregationist Governor Ross Barnet and federal law enforcement officials.
Biography & Autobiography

Becoming Justice Blackmun

Harry Blackmun's Supreme Court Journey

Author: Linda Greenhouse

Publisher: Macmillan

ISBN: 9781429900409

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 288

View: 719

A Pulitzer Prize-winning correspondent with unprecedented access to the inner workings of the U.S. Supreme Court chronicles the personal transformation of a legendary justice From 1970 to 1994, Justice Harry A. Blackmun (1908-1999) wrote numerous landmark Supreme Court decisions, including Roe v. Wade, and participated in the most contentious debates of his era-all behind closed doors. In Becoming Justice Blackmun, Linda Greenhouse of The New York Times draws back the curtain on America's most private branch of government and reveals the backstage story of the Supreme Court through the eyes and writings of this extraordinary justice. Greenhouse was the first print reporter to have access to Blackmun's extensive archive and his private and public papers. From this trove she has crafted a compelling narrative of Blackmun's years on the Court, showing how he never lost sight of the human beings behind the legal cases and how he was not afraid to question his own views on such controversial issues as abortion, the death penalty, and sex discrimination. Greenhouse also tells the story of how Blackmun's lifelong friendship with Chief Justice Warren E. Burger withered in the crucible of life on the nation's highest court, revealing how political differences became personal, even for the country's most respected jurists. Becoming Justice Blackmun, written by America's preeminent Supreme Court reporter, offers a rare and wonderfully vivid portrait of the nation's highest court, including insights into many of the current justices. It is a must-read for everyone who cares about the Court and its impact on our lives.
History

One Mississippi, Two Mississippi

Methodists, Murder, and the Struggle for Racial Justice in Neshoba County

Author: Carol V. R. George

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0190231106

Category: History

Page: 320

View: 4630

During Freedom Summer 1964, three young civil rights workers who were tasked with registering voters at Mt. Zion Methodist Church in Neshoba County, Mississippi were murdered there by law enforcement and Ku Klux Klansmen. The murders were hardly noticed in the area, so familiar had such violence become in the Magnolia State. For forty-one days the bodies of the three men lay undetected in a nearby dam, and for years afterward efforts to bring those responsible to justice were met only with silence. In One Mississippi, Two Mississippi, Carol V.R. George links the history of the Methodist Church (now the United Methodist Church), with newly-researched local history to show the role of this large denomination, important to both blacks and whites, in Mississippi's stumble toward racial justice. From 1930-1968, white Methodists throughout the church segregated their black co-religionists, silencing black ministers and many white ministers as well, locking their doors to all but their own members. Finally, the combination of civil rights activism and embarrassed Methodist morality persuaded the United Methodists to restore black people to full membership. As the county and church integrated, volunteers from all races began to agitate for a new trial for the chief conspirator of the murders. In 2005, forty-one years after the killings, the accused was found guilty, his fate determined by local jurors who deliberated in a city ringed with casinos, unrecognizable to the old Neshoba. In one sense a spiritual history, the book is a microhistory of Mt. Zion Methodist Church and its struggles with white Neshoba, as a community learned that reconciliation requires a willingness to confront the past fully and truthfully. George draws on interviews with county residents, black and white Methodist leaders, civil rights veterans, and those in civic groups, academia, and state government who are trying to carry the flag for reconciliation. George's sources--printed, oral, and material--offer a compelling account of the way in which residents of a place long reviled as "dark Neshoba" have taken up the task of truth-telling in a world uncomfortable with historical truth.
Social Science

Law and Society

An Introduction

Author: Steven E. Barkan

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1351578618

Category: Social Science

Page: 268

View: 4663

This multidisciplinary text draws on the work of anthropologists, historians, law professors, political scientists, psychologists, and sociologists to outline how law is an essential social institution that shapes and is shaped by society. This second edition of Law and Society incorporates the latest research, with dozens of new references, along with many up-to-date examples gleaned from newsworthy events. Two new pedagogical features in each chapter will help students absorb information: learning objectives that precede each chapter’s discussion, and "Thinking about Law and Society" questions that end each chapter and encourage students to think more deeply about specific issues.
History

Deep Politics and the Death of JFK

Author: Peter Dale Scott

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 0520205197

Category: History

Page: 413

View: 1414

Meticulously documented investigation uncovering the political secrets surrounding John F. Kennedy's assassination.
History

The Massey Murder

A Maid, Her Master and the Trial that Shocked a Country

Author: Charlotte Gray

Publisher: Harper Collins

ISBN: 1443409251

Category: History

Page: 336

View: 8125

A Globe and Mail Top 100 Book of the Year An Amazon Top 100 Book of the Year Shortlisted for the RBC Taylor Prize Longlisted for the BC National Award for Canadian Non-Fiction A scandalous crime, a sensational trial, a surprise verdict—the true story of Carrie Davies, the maid who shot a Massey In February 1915, a member of one of Canada’s wealthiest families was shot and killed on the front porch of his home in Toronto as he was returning from work. Carrie Davies, an 18-year-old domestic servant, quickly confessed. But who was the victim here? Charles “Bert” Massey, a scion of a famous family, or the frightened, perhaps mentally unstable Carrie, a penniless British immigrant? When the brilliant lawyer Hartley Dewart, QC, took on her case, his grudge against the powerful Masseys would fuel a dramatic trial that pitted the old order against the new, wealth and privilege against virtue and honest hard work. Set against a backdrop of the Great War in Europe and the changing face of a nation, this sensational crime is brought to vivid life for the first time. As in her previous bestselling book, Gold Diggers—which was made into a Discovery Channel miniseries entitled “Klondike”—multi-award-winning historian and biographer Charlotte Gray has created a captivating narrative rich in detail and brimming with larger-than-life personalities, as she shines a light on a central moment in our past.
History

The Social History of Crime and Punishment in America: A-De

Author: Wilbur R. Miller

Publisher: SAGE

ISBN: 1412988764

Category: History

Page: 2606

View: 5555

Several encyclopedias overview the contemporary system of criminal justice in America, but full understanding of current social problems and contemporary strategies to deal with them can come only with clear appreciation of the historical underpinnings of those problems. Thus, this four-volume work surveys the history and philosophy of crime, punishment, and criminal justice institutions in America from colonial times to the present. It covers the whole of the criminal justice system, from crimes, law enforcement and policing, to courts, corrections and human services. Among other things, this encyclopedia will: explicate philosophical foundations underpinning our system of justice; chart changing patterns in criminal activity and subsequent effects on legal responses; identify major periods in the development of our system of criminal justice; and explore evolving debates and conflicts on how best to address issues of crime and punishment. Its signed entries provide the historical context for students to better understand contemporary criminological debates and the contemporary shape of the U.S. system of law and justice.
History

The Race Beat

The Press, the Civil Rights Struggle, and the Awakening of a Nation

Author: Gene Roberts,Hank Klibanoff

Publisher: Vintage

ISBN: 0307455947

Category: History

Page: 544

View: 9809

An unprecedented examination of how news stories, editorials and photographs in the American press—and the journalists responsible for them—profoundly changed the nation’s thinking about civil rights in the South during the 1950s and ‘60s. Roberts and Klibanoff draw on private correspondence, notes from secret meetings, unpublished articles, and interviews to show how a dedicated cadre of newsmen—black and white—revealed to a nation its most shameful shortcomings that compelled its citizens to act. Meticulously researched and vividly rendered, The Race Beat is an extraordinary account of one of the most calamitous periods in our nation’s history, as told by those who covered it. From the Trade Paperback edition.
History

Unsolved Civil Rights Murder Cases, 1934-1970

Author: Michael Newton

Publisher: McFarland

ISBN: 0786498951

Category: History

Page: 312

View: 4432

The Emmett Till Unsolved Civil Rights Crime Act of 2007 called for review and reinvestigation of "violations of criminal civil rights statutes that occurred not later than December 31, 1969, and resulted in a death." The U.S. Attorney General's review observed that date, while examining cases from 1936 (a date not specified in the Till Act) onward. In selecting violations for review, certain "headline" cases were included while others meeting the same criteria were not considered. This first full-length survey of American civil rights "cold cases" examines unsolved racially motivated murders over nearly four decades, beginning in 1934. The author covers all cases reviewed by the federal government to date, as well as a larger number of cases that were ignored without official explanation.
Reference

The Mississippi Encyclopedia

Author: Ted Ownby,Charles Reagan Wilson,Ann J. Abadie,Odie Lindsey,James G. Thomas

Publisher: Univ. Press of Mississippi

ISBN: 1496811593

Category: Reference

Page: 1600

View: 6292

The perfect book for every Mississippian who cares about the state, this is a mammoth collaboration in which thirty subject editors suggested topics, over seven hundred scholars wrote entries, and countless individuals made suggestions. The volume will appeal to anyone who wants to know more about Mississippi and the people who call it home. The book will be especially helpful to students, teachers, and scholars researching, writing about, or otherwise discovering the state, past and present. The volume contains entries on every county, every governor, and numerous musicians, writers, artists, and activists. Each entry provides an authoritative but accessible introduction to the topic discussed. The Mississippi Encyclopedia also features long essays on agriculture, archaeology, the civil rights movement, the Civil War, drama, education, the environment, ethnicity, fiction, folklife, foodways, geography, industry and industrial workers, law, medicine, music, myths and representations, Native Americans, nonfiction, poetry, politics and government, the press, religion, social and economic history, sports, and visual art. It includes solid, clear information in a single volume, offering with clarity and scholarship a breadth of topics unavailable anywhere else. This book also includes many surprises readers can only find by browsing.
Biography & Autobiography

Aaron Henry of Mississippi

Inside Agitator

Author: Minion K. C. Morrison

Publisher: University of Arkansas Press

ISBN: 1610755642

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 363

View: 3933

Winner of the 2016 Lillian Smith Book Award When Aaron Henry returned home to Mississippi from World War II service in 1946, he was part of wave of black servicemen who challenged the racial status quo. He became a pharmacist through the GI Bill, and as a prominent citizen, he organized a hometown chapter of the NAACP and relatively quickly became leader of the state chapter. From that launching pad he joined and helped lead an ensemble of activists who fundamentally challenged the system of segregation and the almost total exclusion of African Americans from the political structure. These efforts were most clearly evident in his leadership of the integrated Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party delegation, which, after an unsuccessful effort to unseat the lily-white Democratic delegation at the Democratic National Convention in 1964, won recognition from the national party in 1968. The man who the New York Times described as being “at the forefront of every significant boycott, sit-in, protest march, rally, voter registration drive and court case” eventually became a rare example of a social-movement leader who successfully moved into political office. Aaron Henry of Mississippi covers the life of this remarkable leader, from his humble beginnings in a sharecropping family to his election to the Mississippi house of representatives in 1979, all the while maintaining the social-change ideology that prompted him to improve his native state, and thereby the nation.
History

Capital punishment on trial

Furman v. Georgia and the death penalty in modern America

Author: David M. Oshinsky

Publisher: Univ Pr of Kansas

ISBN: N.A

Category: History

Page: 144

View: 9771

In his first book since the Pulitzer Prize--winning Polio: An American Story, renowned historian David Oshinsky takes a new and closer look at the Supreme Court's controversial and much-debated stances on capital punishment--in the landmark case of Furman v. Georgia. Career criminal William Furman shot and killed a homeowner during a 1967 burglary in Savannah, Georgia. Because it was a "black-on-white" crime in the racially troubled South, it also was an open-and-shut case. The trial took less than a day, and the nearly all-white jury rendered a death sentence. Aided by the NAACP's Legal Defense Fund, Furman's African-American attorney, Bobby Mayfield, doggedly appealed the verdict all the way to the U.S. Supreme Court, which in 1972 overturned Furman's sentence by a narrow 5--4 vote, ruling that Georgia's capital punishment statute, and by implication all other state death-penalty laws, was so arbitrary and capricious as to violate the Eighth Amendment's prohibition against "cruel and unusual punishment." Furman effectively, if temporarily, halted capital punishment in the United States. Every death row inmate across the nation was resentenced to life in prison. The decision, however, did not rule the death penalty per se to be unconstitutional; rather, it struck down the laws that currently governed its application, leaving the states free to devise new ones that the Court might find acceptable. And this is exactly what happened. In the coming years, the Supreme Court would uphold an avalanche of state legislation endorsing the death penalty. Capital punishment would return stronger than ever, with many more defendants sentenced to death and eventually executed. Oshinsky demonstrates the troubling roles played by race and class and region in capital punishment. And he concludes by considering the most recent Supreme Court death-penalty cases involving minors and the mentally ill, as well as the impact of international opinion. Compact and engaging, Oshinsky's masterful study reflects a gift for empathy, an eye for the telling anecdote and portrait, and a talent for clarifying the complex and often confusing legal issues surrounding capital punishment.
Comics & Graphic Novels

V for Vendetta

Author: Alan Moore

Publisher: DC

ISBN: 1401236316

Category: Comics & Graphic Novels

Page: N.A

View: 4490

"Alan Moore outdoes himself... Extraordinary ... a poetic celebration of the powers of the imagination." - Kurt Loder, MTV A powerful story about loss of freedom and individuality, V FOR VENDETTA takes place in a totalitarian England following a devastating war that changed the face of the planet. In a world without political freedom, personal freedom and precious little faith in anything, comes a mysterious man in a white porcelain mask who fights political oppressors through terrorism and seemingly absurd acts in this gripping tale of the blurred lines between ideological good and evil.
History

Hell Gate of the Mississippi

The Effie Afton Trial and Abraham Lincoln's Role in it

Author: Larry A. Riney

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9780979152801

Category: History

Page: 323

View: 2026

Step back into what was then the wild-and-woolly Far West of 1857 and the trial that helped make Abraham Lincoln a household name. Get a juryman's front-row view of the Illinois courtroom battle that defined the economic war fought between St. Louis steamboat men and women and their hated foes, the Chicago and New York railroad tycoons. Hell Gate of the Mississippi is the first book that covers this explosive chapter in our early history.