History

Narrating the News

New Journalism and Literary Genre in Late Nineteenth-century American Newspapers and Fiction

Author: Karen Roggenkamp

Publisher: Kent State University Press

ISBN: 9780873388269

Category: History

Page: 199

View: 7924

A scholarly examination of "new journalism" Due to a burgeoning print marketplace during the late nineteenth century, urban newspapers felt pressure to create entertaining prose that appealed to readers, drawing on popular literary genres such as travel adventures, detective tales, and historical romances as a way of framing the news for readers. Using current events for their source documents, reporters fashioned their own dramas based on those that readers recognized from a broadly drawn literary culture. The desire to spin attractive, popular tales sometimes came at the expense of factual information. This novel, commercialized, and sensationalistic style of reporting, called "new journalism," was closely tied to American fiction. In Narrating the News Karen Roggenkamp examines five major stories featured in three respected New York newspapers during the 1890s--the story of two antebellum hoaxes, Nellie Bly's around-the-world journey, Lizzie Borden's sensational trial, Evangelina Cisneros's rescue from her Spanish captors, and the Janet Cooke "Jimmy's World" scandal--to illustrate how new journalism manipulated specific segments of the literary marketplace. These case studies are complemented by broader cultural analyses that touch on vital topics in literary and cultural studies--gender, expansionism, realism, and professionalization. Unlike previously published studies of literature and journalism, which focus only on a few canonical figures, Roggenkamp looks at part of the history of mass print communications more generally, exposing the competitive and reinforcing interplay between specific literary genres and their journalistic revisions. Narrating the News provides an original, significant contribution to the fields of literature, journalism history, and cultural studies.
Authors, American

The Oxford Handbook of Jack London

Author: Jay Williams

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0199315175

Category: Authors, American

Page: 672

View: 5800

"With his novels, journalism, short stories, political activism, and travel writing, Jack London established himself as one of the most prolific and diverse authors of the twentieth century. Covering London's biography, cultural context, and the various genres in which he wrote, The Oxford Handbook of Jack London is the definitive reference work on the author" --
Language Arts & Disciplines

Narrating Class in American Fiction

Author: W. Dow

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 0230617964

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 271

View: 3991

Focusing on American fiction from 1850-1940, Narrating Class in American Fiction offers close readings in the context of literary and political history to detail the uneasy attention American authors gave to class in their production of social identities.
Language Arts & Disciplines

Encyclopedia of Journalism

Author: Christopher H. Sterling

Publisher: SAGE Publications

ISBN: 1452261520

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 3136

View: 4332

"Written in a clear and accessible style that would suit the needs of journalists and scholars alike, this encyclopedia is highly recommended for large news organizations and all schools of journalism." —Starred Review, Library Journal Journalism permeates our lives and shapes our thoughts in ways we've long taken for granted. Whether we listen to National Public Radio in the morning, view the lead story on the Today show, read the morning newspaper headlines, stay up-to-the-minute with Internet news, browse grocery store tabloids, receive Time magazine in our mailbox, or watch the nightly news on television, journalism pervades our daily activities. The six-volume Encyclopedia of Journalism covers all significant dimensions of journalism, including print, broadcast, and Internet journalism; U.S. and international perspectives; history; technology; legal issues and court cases; ownership; and economics. The set contains more than 350 signed entries under the direction of leading journalism scholar Christopher H. Sterling of The George Washington University. In the A-to-Z volumes 1 through 4, both scholars and journalists contribute articles that span the field's wide spectrum of topics, from design, editing, advertising, and marketing to libel, censorship, First Amendment rights, and bias to digital manipulation, media hoaxes, political cartoonists, and secrecy and leaks. Also covered are recently emerging media such as podcasting, blogs, and chat rooms. The last two volumes contain a thorough listing of journalism awards and prizes, a lengthy section on journalism freedom around the world, an annotated bibliography, and key documents. The latter, edited by Glenn Lewis of CUNY Graduate School of Journalism and York College/CUNY, comprises dozens of primary documents involving codes of ethics, media and the law, and future changes in store for journalism education. Key Themes Consumers and Audiences Criticism and Education Economics Ethnic and Minority Journalism Issues and Controversies Journalist Organizations Journalists Law and Policy Magazine Types Motion Pictures Networks News Agencies and Services News Categories News Media: U.S. News Media: World Newspaper Types News Program Types Online Journalism Political Communications Processes and Routines of Journalism Radio and Television Technology
Language Arts & Disciplines

Sympathy, Madness, and Crime

How Four Nineteenth-century Journalists Made the Newspaper Women's Business

Author: Karen Roggenkamp

Publisher: Kent State University Press

ISBN: 9781606352878

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: N.A

View: 7351

American literature

American Literary Realism

Author: N.A

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: American literature

Page: N.A

View: 4955

Narrating the News

New Journalism and Literary Genre in Late Nineteenth-century American Newspapers and Fiction

Author: Karen Hartmann Roggenkamp

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category:

Page: 490

View: 4020

Literary Criticism

Literature and Journalism

Inspirations, Intersections, and Inventions from Ben Franklin to Stephen Colbert

Author: Mark Canada

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 1137329300

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 246

View: 3250

The first of its kind, this collection will explore the ways that literature and journalism have intersected in the work of American writers. Covering the impact of the newspaper on Whitman's poetry, nineteenth-century reporters' fabrications, and Stephen Colbert's alternative journalism, this book will illuminate and inform.
Language Arts & Disciplines

Literary journalism on trial

Masson v. New Yorker and the First Amendment

Author: Kathy Roberts Forde

Publisher: Univ of Massachusetts Pr

ISBN: 9781558496538

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 288

View: 6950

In November 1984, Jeffrey Masson filed a libel suit against writer Janet Malcolm and the New Yorker, claiming that Malcolm had intentionally misquoted him in a profile she wrote for the magazine about his former career as a Freud scholar and administrator of the Freud archives. Over the next twelve years the case moved up and down the federal judicial ladder, at one point reaching the U.S. Supreme Court, as lawyers and judges wrestled with questions about the representation of "truth" in journalism and, by extension, the limits of First Amendment protections of free speech. Had a successful Freudian scholar actually called himself an "intellectual gigolo" and "the greatest analyst who ever lived"? Or had a respected writer for the New Yorker knowingly placed false, self-damning words in her subject's mouth? In Literary Journalism on Trial, Kathy Roberts Forde explores the implications of Masson v. New Yorker in the context of the history of American journalism. She shows how the case represents a watershed moment in a long debate between the advocates of traditional and literary journalism and explains how it reflects a significant intellectual project of the period: the postmodern critique of objectivity, with its insistence on the instability of language and rejection of unitary truth in human affairs. The case, Forde argues, helped widen the perceived divide between ideas of literary and traditional journalism and forced the resolution of these conflicting conceptions of truth in the constitutional arena of libel law. By embracing traditional journalism's emphasis on fact and objectivity and rejecting a broader understanding of truth, the Supreme Court turned away from the FirstAmendment theory articulated in previous rulings, opting to value less the free, uninhibited interchange of ideas necessary to democracy and more the "trustworthiness" of public expression. The Court's decision in this case thus had implications that reached beyond the legal realm to the values and norms expressed in the triangular relationship between American democracy, First Amendment principles, and the press.
Literary Criticism

How One City's Cultural Tradition Shaped American Identity in the Nineteenth Century

Essays on Henry James's The Bostonians (1886)

Author: Elaine Pigeon

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 203

View: 1888

This work is a welcome addition to the existing scholarship on Henry James. While previous analyses have focused on the writer's New York associations, this study offers a comprehensive examination of James's Boston connections.
Language Arts & Disciplines

The New New Journalism

Conversations with America's Best Nonfiction Writers on Their Craft

Author: Robert Boynton

Publisher: Vintage

ISBN: 0307429040

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 496

View: 1215

Forty years after Tom Wolfe, Hunter S. Thompson, and Gay Talese launched the New Journalism movement, Robert S. Boynton sits down with nineteen practitioners of what he calls the New New Journalism to discuss their methods, writings and careers. The New New Journalists are first and foremost brilliant reporters who immerse themselves completely in their subjects. Jon Krakauer accompanies a mountaineering expedition to Everest. Ted Conover works for nearly a year as a prison guard. Susan Orlean follows orchid fanciers to reveal an obsessive subculture few knew existed. Adrian Nicole LeBlanc spends nearly a decade reporting on a family in the South Bronx. And like their muckraking early twentieth-century precursors, they are drawn to the most pressing issues of the day: Alex Kotlowitz, Leon Dash, and William Finnegan to race and class; Ron Rosenbaum to the problem of evil; Michael Lewis to boom-and-bust economies; Richard Ben Cramer to the nitty gritty of politics. How do they do it? In these interviews, they reveal the techniques and inspirations behind their acclaimed works, from their felt-tip pens, tape recorders, long car rides, and assumed identities; to their intimate understanding of the way a truly great story unfolds. Interviews with: Gay Talese Jane Kramer Calvin Trillin Richard Ben Cramer Ted Conover Alex Kotlowitz Richard Preston William Langewiesche Eric Schlosser Leon Dash William Finnegan Jonathan Harr Jon Krakauer Adrian Nicole LeBlanc Michael Lewis Susan Orlean Ron Rosenbaum Lawrence Weschler Lawrence Wright
American literature

American Literary Scholarship

Author: N.A

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: American literature

Page: N.A

View: 5188

English language

Annual Bibliography of English Language and Literature

Author: Modern Humanities Research Association

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: English language

Page: N.A

View: 7738

Includes both books and articles.
Academic libraries

Choice

Publication of the Association of College and Research Libraries, a Division of the American Library Association

Author: N.A

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Academic libraries

Page: N.A

View: 2848

Language Arts & Disciplines

A History of American Literary Journalism

The Emergence of a Modern Narrative Form

Author: John C. Hartsock

Publisher: Univ of Massachusetts Press

ISBN: 9781558492523

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 294

View: 4870

During the 1960s, such works as Truman Capote's In Cold Blood and Joan Didion's Slouching Towards Bethlehem were cited as examples of the "new journalism." True stories that read like novels, they combined the journalist's task of factual reporting with the art of fictional narration. Yet as John C. Hartsock shows in this revealing study, the roots of this distinctive form of writing--whether called new journalism, literary journalism, or creative nonfiction--can be traced at least as far back as the late nineteenth century. In the decades following the American Civil War, Stephen Crane, Lafcadio Hearn, and other journalists challenged the notion, then just emerging, that the reporter's job was to offer a concise statement of the "objective truth." Drawing on the techniques of the realistic novel, these writers developed a new narrative style of reporting aimed at lessening the distance between observer and observed, subject and object. By the 1890s, Hartsock argues, literary journalism had achieved critical recognition as a new form of writing, different not only from "objective" reporting but also from the sensationalistic "yellow press" and at times the socially engaged "muckrakers." In the twentieth century, the form has continued to evolve and maintain its vitality, despite being marginalized by the academic establishment. A former journalist who covered Capitol Hill for UPI and reported on the collapse of the Soviet Union for the San Francisco Examiner, Hartsock brings a fresh and informed perspective to the issues he examines. The result is a concise introduction to the genesis and development of a significant literary genre.
Literary Criticism

Journalism and the Novel

Truth and Fiction, 1700-2000

Author: Doug Underwood

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9780521187541

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 278

View: 3975

Literary journalism is a rich field of study that has played an important role in the creation of the English and American literary canons. In this original and engaging study, Doug Underwood focuses on the many notable journalists-turned-novelists found at the margins of fact and fiction since the early eighteenth century, when the novel and the commercial periodical began to emerge as powerful cultural forces. Writers from both sides of the Atlantic are discussed, from Daniel Defoe to Charles Dickens, and from Mark Twain to Joan Didion. Underwood shows how many literary reputations are built on journalistic foundations of research and reporting, and how this impacts on questions of realism and authenticity throughout the work of many canonical authors. This book will be of great interest to researchers and students of British and American literature.
Literary Criticism

The Novelty of Newspapers

Victorian Fiction After the Invention of the News

Author: Matthew Rubery

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0190451424

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 248

View: 6058

Arising in the 1800s and soon drawing a million readers a day, the commercial press profoundly influenced the work of Bront?, Braddon, Dickens, Conrad, James, Trollope, and others who mined print journalism for fictional techniques. Five of the most important of these narrative conventions--the shipping intelligence, personal advertisement, leading article, interview, and foreign correspondence--show how the Victorian novel is best understood alongside the simultaneous development of newspapers. In highly original analyses of Victorian fiction, this study also captures the surprising ways in which public media enabled the expression of private feeling among ordinary readers: from the trauma caused by a lover's reported suicide to the vicarious gratification felt during a celebrity interview; from the distress at finding one's behavior the subject of unflattering editorial commentary to the apprehension of distant cultures through the foreign correspondence. Combining a wealth of historical research with a series of astute close readings, The Novelty of Newspapers breaks down the assumed divide between the epoch's literature and journalism and demonstrates that newsprint was integral to the development of the novel.
Literary Criticism

Modernism on Fleet Street

Author: Patrick Collier

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1351916939

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 265

View: 5285

British modernism came of age at a time of great cultural anxiety about the state of journalism. The new newspapers, with their brief, flashy articles, striking visuals, hyperbolic headlines, and sensational news, stood at the center of debates about reading in the period, seeming to threaten the viability of representative democracy, the health and vitality of the language, and the very future of literature itself. Patrick Collier's study brings an impressive array of archival research to his exploration of modernism's relationship to the newspaper press. People who sought to make their way as writers could neither remain neutral on this issue nor abandon journalism, which offered an irreplaceable source of income and self-advertisement. Collier discusses five modern writers-T. S. Eliot, James Joyce, Virginia Woolf, Rebecca West, and Rose Macaulay-showing how their work takes part in contemporary debates about journalism and examining the role journalism played in establishing their careers. In doing so, he uncovers tensions and contradictions inherent in the identity of the 'serious artist' who relied on the ephemeral forms of journalism for money and reputation.