Language Arts & Disciplines

Narrating the News

Author: Karen Roggenkamp

Publisher: Kent State University Press

ISBN:

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 199

View: 874

A scholarly examination of "new journalism" Due to a burgeoning print marketplace during the late nineteenth century, urban newspapers felt pressure to create entertaining prose that appealed to readers, drawing on popular literary genres such as travel adventures, detective tales, and historical romances as a way of framing the news for readers. Using current events for their source documents, reporters fashioned their own dramas based on those that readers recognized from a broadly drawn literary culture. The desire to spin attractive, popular tales sometimes came at the expense of factual information. This novel, commercialized, and sensationalistic style of reporting, called "new journalism," was closely tied to American fiction. In Narrating the News Karen Roggenkamp examines five major stories featured in three respected New York newspapers during the 1890s--the story of two antebellum hoaxes, Nellie Bly's around-the-world journey, Lizzie Borden's sensational trial, Evangelina Cisneros's rescue from her Spanish captors, and the Janet Cooke "Jimmy's World" scandal--to illustrate how new journalism manipulated specific segments of the literary marketplace. These case studies are complemented by broader cultural analyses that touch on vital topics in literary and cultural studies--gender, expansionism, realism, and professionalization. Unlike previously published studies of literature and journalism, which focus only on a few canonical figures, Roggenkamp looks at part of the history of mass print communications more generally, exposing the competitive and reinforcing interplay between specific literary genres and their journalistic revisions. Narrating the News provides an original, significant contribution to the fields of literature, journalism history, and cultural studies.
Authors, American

The Oxford Handbook of Jack London

Author: Jay Williams

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN:

Category: Authors, American

Page: 672

View: 587

"With his novels, journalism, short stories, political activism, and travel writing, Jack London established himself as one of the most prolific and diverse authors of the twentieth century. Covering London's biography, cultural context, and the various genres in which he wrote, The Oxford Handbook of Jack London is the definitive reference work on the author" --
Language Arts & Disciplines

The Undeclared War between Journalism and Fiction

Author: D. Underwood

Publisher: Springer

ISBN:

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 250

View: 126

In this volume, Doug Underwood asks whether much of what is now called literary journalism is, in fact, 'literary,' and whether it should rank with the great novels by such journalist-literary figures as Twain, Cather, and Hemingway, who believed that fiction was the better place for a realistic writer to express the important truths of life.
Literary Criticism

Literature and Journalism

Author: Mark Canada

Publisher: Springer

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 246

View: 398

The first of its kind, this collection will explore the ways that literature and journalism have intersected in the work of American writers. Covering the impact of the newspaper on Whitman's poetry, nineteenth-century reporters' fabrications, and Stephen Colbert's alternative journalism, this book will illuminate and inform.
Language Arts & Disciplines

Literary journalism on trial

Author: Kathy Roberts Forde

Publisher: Univ of Massachusetts Pr

ISBN:

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 288

View: 429

In November 1984, Jeffrey Masson filed a libel suit against writer Janet Malcolm and the New Yorker, claiming that Malcolm had intentionally misquoted him in a profile she wrote for the magazine about his former career as a Freud scholar and administrator of the Freud archives. Over the next twelve years the case moved up and down the federal judicial ladder, at one point reaching the U.S. Supreme Court, as lawyers and judges wrestled with questions about the representation of "truth" in journalism and, by extension, the limits of First Amendment protections of free speech. Had a successful Freudian scholar actually called himself an "intellectual gigolo" and "the greatest analyst who ever lived"? Or had a respected writer for the New Yorker knowingly placed false, self-damning words in her subject's mouth? In Literary Journalism on Trial, Kathy Roberts Forde explores the implications of Masson v. New Yorker in the context of the history of American journalism. She shows how the case represents a watershed moment in a long debate between the advocates of traditional and literary journalism and explains how it reflects a significant intellectual project of the period: the postmodern critique of objectivity, with its insistence on the instability of language and rejection of unitary truth in human affairs. The case, Forde argues, helped widen the perceived divide between ideas of literary and traditional journalism and forced the resolution of these conflicting conceptions of truth in the constitutional arena of libel law. By embracing traditional journalism's emphasis on fact and objectivity and rejecting a broader understanding of truth, the Supreme Court turned away from the FirstAmendment theory articulated in previous rulings, opting to value less the free, uninhibited interchange of ideas necessary to democracy and more the "trustworthiness" of public expression. The Court's decision in this case thus had implications that reached beyond the legal realm to the values and norms expressed in the triangular relationship between American democracy, First Amendment principles, and the press.