Language Arts & Disciplines

Now the News

The Story of Broadcast Journalism

Author: Edward Bliss, Jr.

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN: 9780231521932

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 575

View: 9667

-- Walter Cronkite
Language Arts & Disciplines

Now the News

The Story of Broadcast Journalism

Author: Edward Bliss

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9780231044035

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 575

View: 1263

Chronicles the history of broadcast journalism in the United States
Language Arts & Disciplines

Writing News for Broadcast

Author: Edward Bliss,James L. Hoyt

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN: 9780231079730

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 161

View: 955

Why are living things alive? As a theoretical biologist, Robert Rosen saw this as the most fundamental of all questions-and yet it had never been answered satisfactorily by science. The answers to this question would allow humanity to make an enormous leap forward in our understanding of the principles at work in our world. For centuries, it was believed that the only scientific approach to the question "What is life?" must proceed from the Cartesian metaphor (organism as machine). Classical approaches in science, which also borrow heavily from Newtonian mechanics, are based on a process called "reductionism." The thinking was that we can better learn about an intricate, complicated system (like an organism) if we take it apart, study the components, and then reconstruct the system-thereby gaining an understanding of the whole. However, Rosen argues that reductionism does not work in biology and ignores the complexity of organisms. Life Itself, a landmark work, represents the scientific and intellectual journey that led Rosen to question reductionism and develop new scientific approaches to understanding the nature of life. Ultimately, Rosen proposes an answer to the original question about the causal basis of life in organisms. He asserts that renouncing the mechanistic and reductionistic paradigm does not mean abandoning science. Instead, Rosen offers an alternate paradigm for science that takes into account the relational impacts of organization in natural systems and is based on organized matter rather than on particulate matter alone. Central to Rosen's work is the idea of a "complex system," defined as any system that cannot be fully understood by reducing it to its parts. In this sense, complexity refers to the causal impact of organization on the system as a whole. Since both the atom and the organism can be seen to fit that description, Rosen asserts that complex organization is a general feature not just of the biosphere on Earth-but of the universe itself.
Social Science

Edward R. Murrow and the Birth of Broadcast Journalism

Author: Bob Edwards

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 9781118039991

Category: Social Science

Page: 192

View: 8438

"Get it, read it, and pass it on." —Bill Moyers "Most Americans living today never heard Ed Murrow in a live broadcast. This book is for them I want them to know that broadcast journalism was established by someone with the highest standards. Tabloid crime stories, so much a part of the lust for ratings by today's news broadcasters, held no interest for Murrow. He did like Hollywood celebrities, but interviewed them for his entertainment programs; they had no place on his news programs. My book is focused on this life in journalism. I offer it in the hope that more people in and out of the news business will get to know Ed Murrow. Perhaps in time the descent from Murrow's principles can be reversed." —Bob Edwards
Language Arts & Disciplines

News Now

Visual Storytelling in the Digital Age (2-downloads)

Author: Susan Green,Mark Lodato,B. William Silcock,Carol Schwalbe

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1317346092

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 320

View: 6825

Debuting in its first edition News Now: Visual Storytelling in the Digital Age helps today's broadcast journalism students prepare for a mobile, interactive, and highly competitive workplace. The authors, all faculty members of the prestigious Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication, bring their real-world expertise to a book designed to be a trusted reference for the next generation of broadcast journalists.
Language Arts & Disciplines

Broadcast Journalism

Techniques of Radio and Television News

Author: Andrew Boyd,Peter Stewart,Ray Alexander

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

ISBN: 1136025855

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 400

View: 3278

This newest edition of Broadcast Journalism continues its long tradition of covering the basics of broadcasting from gathering news sources, interviewing, putting together a programme, news writing, reporting, editing, working in the studio, conducting live reports, and more. Two new authors have joined forces in this new edition to present behind the scenes perspectives on multimedia broadcast news, where it is heading, and how you get there. Technology is meshing global and local news. Constant interactivity between on-the-scene reporting and nearly instantaneous broadcasting to the world has changed the very nature of how broadcast journalists must think, act, write and report on a 24/7 basis. This new edition takes up this digital workflow and convergence. Students of broadcast journalism and professors alike will find that the sixth edition of Broadcast Journalism is completely up-to-date. Includes new photos, quotations, and coverage of convergent journalism, podcasting, multimedia journalism, citizen journalism, and more!
History

That's the Way It Is

A History of Television News in America

Author: Charles L. Ponce de Leon

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 022625609X

Category: History

Page: 352

View: 4012

When critics decry the current state of our public discourse, one reliably easy target is television news. It’s too dumbed-down, they say; it’s no longer news but entertainment, celebrity-obsessed and vapid. The critics may be right. But, as Charles L. Ponce de Leon explains in That’s the Way It Is, TV news has always walked a fine line between hard news and fluff. The familiar story of decline fails to acknowledge real changes in the media and Americans’ news-consuming habits, while also harking back to a golden age that, on closer examination, is revealed to be not so golden after all. Ponce de Leon traces the entire history of televised news, from the household names of the late 1940s and early ’50s, like Eric Sevareid, Edward R. Murrow, and Walter Cronkite, through the rise of cable, the political power of Fox News, and the satirical punch of Colbert and Stewart. He shows us an industry forever in transition, where newsmagazines and celebrity profiles vie with political news and serious investigations. The need for ratings success—and the lighter, human interest stories that can help bring it—Ponce de Leon makes clear, has always sat uneasily alongside a real desire to report hard news. Highlighting the contradictions and paradoxes at the heart of TV news, and telling a story rich in familiar figures and fascinating anecdotes, That’s the Way It Is will be the definitive account of how television has showed us our history as it happens.
Language Arts & Disciplines

Advancing the Story

Journalism in a Multimedia World

Author: Debora Halpern Wenger,Deborah Potter

Publisher: CQ Press

ISBN: 1483350983

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 432

View: 909

“An eminently useful text for television and Web journalism. No other text does such thorough job of integrating new media into traditional TV reporting. The authors' blog is a great way to keep updated and introduce current material into the class, and the online interactive workbook has some truly inventive exercises.” - Michael Cremedas, Syracuse University This fully updated Third Edition of Advancing the Story, by Debora Halpern Wenger and Deborah Potter, builds on the essential strengths of the original text by providing clear instruction on reporting and producing for multiple platforms, real-world examples, advice from professional journalists and exercises to stimulate additional conversations. By focusing on the skills journalists need to leverage social media and capitalize on the use of mobile devices, the authors explore the role data-driven journalism is playing in the profession. Throughout the book, new screen shots, images, research and examples of broadcast and multimedia reporting bring concepts to life. Additionally, a greater emphasis on journalism ethics permeates the book, with each chapter now including a series of discussion starters to ensure that students consider the ethical implications of their journalistic decisions.
Performing Arts

Salant, CBS, and the Battle for the Soul of Broadcast Journalism

The Memoirs of Richard S. Salant

Author: Richard S. Salant

Publisher: Basic Books

ISBN: N.A

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 326

View: 4730

Salant, CBS, and the Battle for the Soul of Broadcast Journalism tells the story of CBS News during its golden era. The late Richard S. Salant was president of CBS News for sixteen years throughout the 1960s and 1970s. He became widely recognized by journalists as the ”patron saint of television news.” During his tenure, Salant confronted issues of enormous importance - Vietnam, the civil rights movement, and Watergate - and launched the first thirty-minute Evening News, CBS Morning News, and 60 Minutes. Along the way, he hired Mike Wallace, Roger Mudd, Dan Rather, and Diane Sawyer. This first-person account, compiled and edited by Susan and Bill Buzenberg during the years since Salant’s death in 1993, is an important part of the history of broadcast journalism, an inside story of the politicians and journalists who shaped our recent history, and an eloquent alarm about the current erosion of broadcast journalism standards.
Broadcasters

Five Seconds to Air

Broadcast Journalism Behind the Scenes

Author: Bob Losure

Publisher: Providence House Publishers

ISBN: 9781577361077

Category: Broadcasters

Page: 148

View: 1563

In Five Seconds to Air, Losure shares his life story with great fun and panache as he chronicles his roots in Tulsa, Oklahoma, and his journey to Atlanta to anchor at CNN Headline News, a position he held for eleven years. He brings us face-to-face with some of the stories and events that have shaped our lives, including the Persian Gulf War and the 1989 San Francisco earthquake, as he recounts these events from the inside perspective of the CNN anchor who kept Americans informed while the news broke and unfolded. On a more serious note, Losure shares a very personal battle with cancer and his subsequent chemotherapy.
History

The Origins of Television News in America

The Visualizers of CBS in the 1940s

Author: Mike Conway

Publisher: Peter Lang

ISBN: 9781433106026

Category: History

Page: 397

View: 1258

This is the first in-depth look at the development of the television newscast, the most popular source of news for over forty-five years. During the 1940s, most journalists ignored or dismissed television, leaving the challenge to a small group of people working above New York City’s Grand Central Terminal. Without the pressures of ratings, sponsors, company oversight, or many viewers, the group refused to recreate newspapers, radio, or newsreels on the new medium. They experimented, argued, tested, and eventually settled on a format to exploit television’s strengths. This book documents that process, challenging common myths – including the importance of a popular anchor, and television’s inability to communicate non-visual stories – and crediting those whose work was critical in the formation of television as a news format, and illustrating the pressures and professional roadblocks facing those who dare question journalistic traditions of any era.
Technology & Engineering

Sound Reporting

The NPR Guide to Audio Journalism and Production

Author: Jonathan Kern

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 022611175X

Category: Technology & Engineering

Page: 380

View: 2653

Perhaps you’ve always wondered how public radio gets that smooth, well-crafted sound. Maybe you’re thinking about starting a podcast, and want some tips from the pros. Or maybe storytelling has always been a passion of yours, and you want to learn to do it more effectively. Whatever the case—whether you’re an avid NPR listener or you aspire to create your own audio, or both—Sound Reporting: The NPR Guide to Audio Journalism and Production will give you a rare tour of the world of a professional broadcaster. Jonathan Kern, who has trained NPR’s on-air staff for years, is a gifted guide, able to narrate a day in the life of a host and lay out the nuts and bolts of production with equal wit and warmth. Along the way, he explains the importance of writing the way you speak, reveals how NPR books guests ranging from world leaders to neighborhood newsmakers, and gives sage advice on everything from proposing stories to editors to maintaining balance and objectivity. Best of all—because NPR wouldn’t be NPR without its array of distinctive voices—lively examples from popular shows and colorful anecdotes from favorite personalities animate each chapter. As public radio’s audience of millions can attest, NPR’s unique guiding principles and technical expertise combine to connect with listeners like no other medium can. With today’s technologies allowing more people to turn their home computers into broadcast studios, Sound Reporting couldn’t have arrived at a better moment to reveal the secrets behind the story of NPR’s success.
Performing Arts

Fifty Years of 60 Minutes

The Inside Story of Television's Most Influential News Broadcast

Author: Jeff Fager

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 1501135821

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 416

View: 6785

“An illuminating TV show biography” (Kirkus Reviews), the ultimate inside story of 60 Minutes—the program that has tracked and shaped the biggest moments in post-war American history. From its almost accidental birth in 1968, 60 Minutes has set the standard for broadcast journalism. The show has profiled every major leader, artist, and movement of the past five decades, perfecting the news-making interview and inventing the groundbreaking TV exposé. From legendary sit-downs with Richard Nixon in 1968 and Bill Clinton in 1992 to landmark investigations into the tobacco industry, Lance Armstrong’s doping, and the torture of prisoners in Abu-Ghraib, the broadcast has not just reported on our world but changed it, too. Executive Producer Jeff Fager takes us into the editing room with the show’s brilliant producers and beloved correspondents, including hard-charging Mike Wallace, writer’s-writer Morley Safer, soft-but-tough Ed Bradley, relentless Lesley Stahl, intrepid Scott Pelley, and illuminating storyteller Steve Kroft. He details the decades of human drama that have made the show’s success possible: the ferocious competition between correspondents, the door slamming, the risk-taking, and the pranks. Above all, Fager reveals the essential tenets that have never changed: why founder Don Hewitt believed “hearing” a story is more important than seeing it, why the “small picture” is the best way to illuminate a larger one, and why the most memorable stories are almost always those with a human being at the center. “As traditional reporting is increasingly being challenged by high-decibel, opinion-drenched media, Fager highlights storytelling that conveys a deep understanding of issues and demonstrates the power of television to inform” (The Washington Post). Fifty Years of 60 Minutes is at once a sweeping portrait of fifty years of American cultural history and an intimate look at how the news gets made.
Fiction

Now this

Radio, Television-- and the Real World

Author: Judy Muller

Publisher: Putnam Publishing Group

ISBN: N.A

Category: Fiction

Page: 211

View: 1963

The worlds of electronic journalism and reality collide in a humorous celebration of life behind the microphone that highlights the war between single parenthood and ambition, competition between peers, and egocentricity. 50,000 first printing.
Language Arts & Disciplines

Beyond News

The Future of Journalism

Author: Mitchell Stephens

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN: 0231159382

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 192

View: 4502

For a century and a half, journalists made a good business out of selling the latest news or selling ads next to that news. Now that news pours out of the Internet and our mobile devices—fast, abundant, and mostly free—that era is ending. Our best journalists, Mitchell Stephens argues, instead must offer original, challenging perspectives—not just slightly more thorough accounts of widely reported events. His book proposes a new standard: “wisdom journalism,” an amalgam of the more rarified forms of reporting—exclusive, enterprising, investigative—and informed, insightful, interpretive, explanatory, even opinionated takes on current events. This book features an original, sometimes critical examination of contemporary journalism, both on- and offline. And it finds inspiration for a more ambitious and effective understanding of journalism in examples from twenty-first-century articles and blogs, as well as in a selection of outstanding twentieth-century journalism and Benjamin Franklin’s eighteenth-century writings. Most attempts to deal with journalism’s current crisis emphasize technology. This book emphasizes mindsets and the need to rethink what journalism has been and might become.
Language Arts & Disciplines

Writing for Broadcast News

A Storytelling Approach to Crafting TV and Radio News Reports

Author: Charles Raiteri

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield

ISBN: 9780742540279

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 163

View: 4508

Writing for Broadcast News makes the storytelling elements that comprise a broadcast news story for radio or TV accessible to beginning broadcast writers. Its step-by-step approach shows how to structure a story with a clear beginning, middle, and end through a framework that ties together the anchor lead, reporter narrative, and actualities or sound bites. Emphasizing that people are interested in people, this handbook highlights the human element and "putting a face" on the story. It gives practical advice to aspiring broadcast reporters and writers toward becoming effective storytellers.
Language Arts & Disciplines

Better Broadcast Writing, Better Broadcast News

Author: Greg Dobbs

Publisher: CRC Press

ISBN: 1317349903

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 272

View: 7569

Better Broadcast Writing, Better Broadcast News teaches students how to write with the conversational simplicity required for radio and TV. This text draws on the Emmy Award-winning author's decades of professional experience in broadcast journalism. In addition to writing, the text also discusses the other elements that make up a good story--producing, reporting, shooting, editing, and ethics. The author's real-world perspective conveys the excitement of a career in journalism.
Computers

Online journalism

principles and practices of news for the Web

Author: James C. Foust

Publisher: Holcomb Hathaway Pubs

ISBN: N.A

Category: Computers

Page: 271

View: 3002

Biography & Autobiography

The Murrow Boys

Pioneers on the Front Lines of Broadcast Journalism

Author: Stanley Cloud

Publisher: Thomas Allen Publishers

ISBN: 9780395680841

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 445

View: 9592

Looks at a group of foreign correspondents who transformed broadcast journalism, including Edward R. Murrow, Eric Sevaried, William L. Shirer, and Howard K. Smith
Language Arts & Disciplines

Writing for Broadcast Journalists

Author: Rick Thompson

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1136929630

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 208

View: 7909

'This is a superb book which combines the rare mixture of high quality information with humour. The style of writing engages the reader from the introduction and the experience and insight of the author occasionally makes it difficult to put down, a rare feature of a textbook. I would unreservedly recommend this book not only to those studying journalism but to students of language and all who use the spoken and written word as the ‘materials’ of their work.' Barry Turner, Nottingham Trent University 'Rick Thompson's guidance manual is packed with advice to would-be writers for this medium. He's someone with years of experience at the top level of the national and international profession, and he's smack up to date with his references. The book is aimed at journalists, but anyone with a serious interest in developing their literacy will learn a lot about professional writing skills from what he has to say.' Roy Johnson, www.mantex.co.uk Writing for Broadcast Journalists guides readers through the significant differences between the written and the spoken versions of journalistic English. It will help broadcast journalists at every stage of their careers to avoid such pitfalls as the use of newspaper-English, common linguistic errors, and Americanised phrases, and gives practical advice on accurate terminology and pronunciation, while encouraging writers to capture the immediacy of the spoken word in their scripts. Writing for Broadcast Journalists includes: practical tips on how to avoid ‘journalese’, clichés and jargon guidance on tailoring your writing style to suit a particular audience advice on converting agency copy into spoken English writing to television pictures examples of scripts from some of the best in the business an appendix of ‘dangerous’ words and phrases to be avoided in scripts.