Installations (Art)

Life in Death

Author: Rebecca Louise Law

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9781842466469

Category: Installations (Art)

Page: 172

View: 9468

Life in Death is the most comprehensive collection to date of work by artist Rebecca Louise Law. The book documents the evolution of Law's unique artistic practice, the use of flowers as preserved sculptural material. A journey through the earliest experiments, to her best known immersive installations, via a series of beautifully documented photographs. It also provides a unique insight into the life and influences of the artist, including an introduction written by Law. The title culminates with exclusive imagery of Life in Death, Law's forthcoming exhibition showcasing a sculptural installation at the heart of Kew's Shirley Sherwood Gallery, which pays homage to the expertise in preservation presented throughout Kew's collections and represents a symbol of natural durability which is central to Law's practice. Life in Death runs from 7 October 2017 - 11 March 2018 in the Shirley Sherwood Gallery of Botanical Art, Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew.
Law

The Law of Life and Death

Author: Elizabeth Price Foley

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 0674060903

Category: Law

Page: 314

View: 2688

Are you alive? Most people believe that some law defines our status as living (or not) for all purposes. But Foley shows that “not being dead” isn’t necessarily the same as being alive, in the eyes of the law. The need for more organ transplants and conservation of health care resources is exerting pressure to expand the legal definition of death.
Social Science

Subject to Death

Life and Loss in a Buddhist World

Author: Robert Desjarlais

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 022635590X

Category: Social Science

Page: 304

View: 395

If any anthropologist living today can illuminate our dim understanding of death’s enigma, it is Robert Desjarlais. With Subject to Death, Desjarlais provides an intimate, philosophical account of death and mourning practices among Hyolmo Buddhists, an ethnically Tibetan Buddhist people from Nepal. He studies the death preparations of the Hyolmo, their specific rituals of grieving, and the practices they use to heal the psychological trauma of loss. Desjarlais’s research marks a major advance in the ethnographic study of death, dying, and grief, one with broad implications. Ethnologically nuanced, beautifully written, and twenty-five years in the making, Subject to Death is an insightful study of how fundamental aspects of human existence—identity, memory, agency, longing, bodiliness—are enacted and eventually dissolved through social and communicative practices.
Nature

The Plants of Sudan and South Sudan

An Annotated Checklist

Author: Iain Darbyshire,Helen Pickering,Maha Kordofani,Imadeldin Farag,Ruba Candiga

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9781842464731

Category: Nature

Page: 450

View: 3406

This is the first publication dedicated to the flora of the Republic of Sudan and the recently seceded Republic of South Sudan. This up to date comprehensive checklist provides a baseline reference for all future botanical and conservation work in the Sudan region.
Biography & Autobiography

Signs of Life

A Memoir

Author: Natalie Taylor

Publisher: Broadway Books

ISBN: 0307717518

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 320

View: 1520

“I know. I know. No one says it but I know…” —from Signs of Life Twenty-four-year-old Natalie Taylor was leading a charmed life. At the age of twenty four, she had a fulfilling job as a high school English teacher, a wonderful husband, a new house and a baby on the way. Then, while visiting her sister, she gets the news that Josh has died in a freak accident. Four months before the birth of her son, Natalie is leveled by loss. What follows is an incredibly powerful emotional journey, as Natalie calls upon resources she didn’t even know she had in order to re-imagine and re-build a life for her and her son. In vivid and immediate detail, Natalie documents her life from the day of Josh’s death through the birth their son, Kai, as she struggles in her role as a new mother where everyone is watching her for signs of impending collapse. With honesty, raw pain, and most surprising, a wicked sense of humor, Natalie recounts the agonies and unexpected joys of her new life. There is the frustration of holidays, navigating the relationship with her in-laws, the comfort she finds and unlikely friendship she forges in support groups and the utterly breathtaking, but often overwhelming new motherhood. When she returns to the classroom, she finds that little is more healing than the honesty and egocentricity of teenagers. Drawing on lessons from beloved books like The Color Purple and The Catcher in the Rye and the talk shows she suddenly can’t get enough of, from the strength of her family and friends, and from a rich fantasy life—including a saucy fairy godmother who guides her grieving—Natalie embarks on the ultimate journey of self-discovery and realizes you can sometimes find the best in yourself during the worst life has to offer. And she delivers these lessons, in way that feels like she’s right beside you in her bathrobe and with a glass of wine--the cool, funny girlfriend you love to stay up all night with. Unforgettable and utterly absorbing, Signs of Life features a powerful, wholly original debut voice that will have you crying and laughing to the very last page. From the Hardcover edition.
Biography & Autobiography

RAF Liberators Over Burma

Flying With 159 Squadron

Author: Bill Kirkness ,Matt Poole

Publisher: Fonthill Media

ISBN: N.A

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 256

View: 7588

The RAF air war versus Japan in the Far East is grossly under-represented in print; the Kirkness memoir lessens this gap with its valuable contributionsThirty-two combat ops may seem like too many to individually chronicle in a single memoir; however, each op’s narrative is compellingly, and uniquely, presented and the cumulative result is that Kirkness’ final, harrowing, op is the most riveting of them allLavishly illustrated with previously unpublished photographs RAF wireless operator/air gunner Bill ‘Enoch’ Kirkness flew thirty-two B-24 Liberator bomber sorties, twenty-eight of which were against Japanese targets in Burma. He was credited with downing the night fighter that killed a crewmate and severely damaged his Liberator; his aircraft’s crash landing abruptly ending his first tour. Bill was subsequently awarded a Distinguished Flying Medal. His memoir of Wellington ferry flights, Liberator training, and ops with 159 Squadron typifies aspects of the human spirit, which any young man immersed within such a conflict would have likely experienced. Bill wore his heart, not just his sergeant’s stripes, on his sleeve. His story is a compelling, dignified account of an average man’s war from 1942 into 1944 in the UK, the Mediterranean, Africa, and onwards through his first operational tour based in India. Matt Poole, an expert on 159 Squadron and RAF Liberator activities against the Japanese, seamlessly enhances Bill’s narrative with added historical detail. Although Bill passed away in 1994, Matt vowed, in retirement, to help bring the memoir to a wider audience.
Social Science

Another Day in the Death of America

A Chronicle of Ten Short Lives

Author: Gary Younge

Publisher: Nation Books

ISBN: 156858976X

Category: Social Science

Page: 304

View: 7003

Winner of the 2017 J. Anthony Lukas PrizeShortlisted for the 2017 Hurston/Wright Foundation AwardFinalist for the 2017 Helen Bernstein Book Award for Excellence in JournalismLonglisted for the 2017 Andrew Carnegie Medal for Excellence in Non Fiction On an average day in America, seven children and teens will be shot dead. In Another Day in the Death of America, award-winning journalist Gary Younge tells the stories of the lives lost during one such day. It could have been any day, but he chose November 23, 2013. Black, white, and Latino, aged nine to nineteen, they fell at sleepovers, on street corners, in stairwells, and on their own doorsteps. From the rural Midwest to the barrios of Texas, the narrative crisscrosses the country over a period of twenty-four hours to reveal the full human stories behind the gun-violence statistics and the brief mentions in local papers of lives lost. This powerful and moving work puts a human face-a child's face-on the "collateral damage" of gun deaths across the country. This is not a book about gun control, but about what happens in a country where it does not exist. What emerges in these pages is a searing and urgent portrait of youth, family, and firearms in America today.
Social Science

Life Beside Itself

Imagining Care in the Canadian Arctic

Author: Lisa Stevenson

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 0520958551

Category: Social Science

Page: 272

View: 2468

In Life Beside Itself, Lisa Stevenson takes us on a haunting ethnographic journey through two historical moments when life for the Canadian Inuit has hung in the balance: the tuberculosis epidemic (1940s to the early 1960s) and the subsequent suicide epidemic (1980s to the present). Along the way, Stevenson troubles our commonsense understanding of what life is and what it means to care for the life of another. Through close attention to the images in which we think and dream and through which we understand the world, Stevenson describes a world in which life is beside itself: the name-soul of a teenager who dies in a crash lives again in his friend’s newborn baby, a young girl shares a last smoke with a dead friend in a dream, and the possessed hands of a clock spin uncontrollably over its face. In these contexts, humanitarian policies make little sense because they attempt to save lives by merely keeping a body alive. For the Inuit, and perhaps for all of us, life is "somewhere else," and the task is to articulate forms of care for others that are adequate to that truth.
Social Science

Life in Debt

Times of Care and Violence in Neoliberal Chile

Author: Clara Han

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 0520951751

Category: Social Science

Page: 298

View: 5889

Chile is widely known as the first experiment in neoliberalism in Latin America, carried out and made possible through state violence. Since the beginning of the transition in 1990, the state has pursued a national project of reconciliation construed as debts owed to the population. The state owed a "social debt" to the poor accrued through inequalities generated by economic liberalization, while society owed a "moral debt" to the victims of human rights violations. Life in Debt invites us into lives and world of a poor urban neighborhood in Santiago. Tracing relations and lives between 1999 and 2010, Clara Han explores how the moral and political subjects imagined and asserted by poverty and mental health policies and reparations for human rights violations are refracted through relational modes and their boundaries. Attending to intimate scenes and neighborhood life, Han reveals the force of relations in the making of selves in a world in which unstable work patterns, illness, and pervasive economic indebtedness are aspects of everyday life. Lucidly written, Life in Debt provides a unique meditation on both the past inhabiting actual life conditions but also on the difficulties of obligation and achievements of responsiveness.
Self-Help

Dying to Be Me

Author: Anita Moorjani

Publisher: Hay House, Inc

ISBN: 1401937527

Category: Self-Help

Page: 266

View: 1122

In this truly inspirational memoir, Anita Moorjani relates how, after fighting cancer for almost four years, her body began shutting down—overwhelmed by the malignant cells spreading throughout her system. As her organs failed, she entered into an extraordinary near-death experience where she realized her inherent worth . . . and the actual cause of her disease. Upon regaining consciousness, Anita found that her condition had improved so rapidly that she was released from the hospital within weeks—without a trace of cancer in her body! Within this enhanced e-book, Anita recounts—in words and on video—stories of her childhood in Hong Kong, her challenge to establish her career and find true love, as well as how she eventually ended up in that hospital bed where she defied all medical knowledge. In "Dying to Be Me," Anita Freely shares all she has learned about illness, healing, fear, "being love," and the true magnificence of each and every human being!
Social Science

Life in Crisis

The Ethical Journey of Doctors Without Borders

Author: Peter Redfield

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 0520955188

Category: Social Science

Page: 338

View: 6489

Life in Crisis tells the story of Médecins Sans Frontières (Doctors Without Borders or MSF) and its effort to "save lives" on a global scale. Begun in 1971 as a French alternative to the Red Cross, the MSF has grown into an international institution with a reputation for outspoken protest as well as technical efficiency. It has also expanded beyond emergency response, providing for a wider range of endeavors, including AIDS care. Yet its seemingly simple ethical goal proves deeply complex in practice. MSF continually faces the problem of defining its own limits. Its minimalist form of care recalls the promise of state welfare, but without political resolution or a sense of well-being beyond health and survival. Lacking utopian certainty, the group struggles when the moral clarity of crisis fades. Nevertheless, it continues to take action and innovate. Its organizational history illustrates both the logic and the tensions of casting humanitarian medicine into a leading role in international affairs.
Fiction

Bound South

A Novel

Author: Susan Rebecca White

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 9781416560630

Category: Fiction

Page: 352

View: 7522

From the award winning author of A Soft Place to Land and A Place at the Table comes a tale of three vibrant and unique Southern women—Louise, Caroline, and Missy—as their lives intersect in unexpected and extraordinary ways. From the outside, Louise Parker seems like a proper Southern matron. But inside, Louise seethes. She’s thwarted by her seemingly perfect husband, frustrated with her talented but rebellious daughter, scarred by her philandering father, and exasperated by her unstable mother. Louise simply doesn’t know how to stop playing the role she’s been starring in for her entire life. A gifted actress, Louise’s daughter Caroline can make any character seem real when she takes the stage. But Caroline is lost when it comes to relationships, especially when dealing with her mother. When Caroline’s young, handsome drama teacher seduces her, she can’t resist. But her forbidden affair will lead Caroline to a different kind of stage, with a new audience. Missy loves Jesus nearly as much as she misses her father, a part-time minister who deserted his family when Missy was three. She accompanies her mother to work as a maid at the Parker residence, for two reasons: to help her mother to clean the house and to save the Parkers’ irreverent son Charles. By turns hilarious and poignant, this is a richly compelling debut novel of family, friendship, and folly.
Nature

Early Modern Zoology

The Construction of Animals in Science, Literature and the Visual Arts

Author: Karel A. E. Enenkel,Paulus Johannes Smith

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN: 9004131884

Category: Nature

Page: 336

View: 9224

In this volume, specialists from various disciplines (Neo-Latin, French, German, Dutch, History, History of Science, Art History) explore the fascinating early modern discourses on animals in science, literature and the visual arts.
Science

A Natural History of the Senses

Author: Diane Ackerman

Publisher: Vintage

ISBN: 0307763315

Category: Science

Page: 352

View: 7836

Diane Ackerman's lusciously written grand tour of the realm of the senses includes conversations with an iceberg in Antarctica and a professional nose in New York, along with dissertations on kisses and tattoos, sadistic cuisine and the music played by the planet Earth. “Delightful . . . gives the reader the richest possible feeling of the worlds the senses take in.” —The New York Times
Art

Bureau of the centre for the study of surrealism and its legacies

Author: Mark Dion,David Lomas,Anna Dezeuze,Julia Kelly,Manchester Museum (University of Manchester),Arts and Humanities Research Board (Great Britain). Research Centre for Studies of Surrealism and its Legacies

Publisher: Book Works

ISBN: N.A

Category: Art

Page: 128

View: 4061

Gardening

Identification of Trees and Shrubs in Winter Using Buds and Twigs

Author: Bernd Schulz

Publisher: Royal Botanic Gardens Kew

ISBN: 9781842466506

Category: Gardening

Page: 368

View: 9027

For many plant lovers, winter seems like a lost time. The bursts of color and distinctive leaf shapes disappear, leaving what seems like ambiguous branches. But there is no need for botanical enthusiasts to hunker down until spring. What we overlook as "dead trees" are simply shoots covered up for the season. If we look closer, we'll see that trees and shrubs have distinct shapes to their buds and twigs that allow them to be classified reliably in winter. While most books focus on identifying leaves and other seasonal characteristics, this practical guide is one of the few that will allow gardeners to identify trees and shrubs while they are in their dormant state. It covers more than seven hundred species and includes easy-to-use illustrated identification keys. More than 1,400 color images make it even easier to spot the distinctive pieces of these plants.
Gardening

The Magical World of Moss Gardening

Author: Annie Martin

Publisher: Timber Press

ISBN: 1604697164

Category: Gardening

Page: 240

View: 2597

“This is a fascinating books for anyone wanting to truly broaden the range of plants they grow.” —Gardens Illustrated Moss is an extraordinary plant—it grows without roots, flowers, or stems. Despite being overlooked, in many ways, moss is perfect: it provides year-round color, excels in difficult climates, prevents soil erosion, and resists pests and disease. In The Magical World of Moss Gardening, bryophyte expert Annie Martin reveals how moss can be used in stunning, eco-friendly spaces. The beautifully illustrated guide includes basics on designing and planting a moss garden, as an inspiring tour of the most magical public and private moss gardens throughout the country.
Biography & Autobiography

Queen of Bohemia

The Life of Louise Bryant

Author: Mary V. Dearborn

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9780735101463

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 424

View: 6852

Describes the life of the radical turn-of-the-century journalist, including her reporting on the Bolshevik Revolution and the Paris subculture
Nature

Coffee Atlas of Ethiopia

Author: Aaron Davis,Justin Moat,Tim Wilkinson

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9781842466209

Category: Nature

Page: 56

View: 8379

This richly illustrated volume is the first complete atlas of coffee production in Ethiopia, the natural home of Arabica coffee and Africa's largest coffee producer. One of the most important coffee-growing regions of the world, Ethiopia is world-renowned for its diversity of flavor profiles, including the celebrated coffees of Harar, Sidamo, Yirgacheffe and Limu. Around 15 million Ethiopians are coffee farmers, and this innovative atlas is a state-of-the-artview of wild coffee forests, forest coffee production areas, and coffee gardens. It provides an invaluable resource for understanding the Ethiopian coffee landscape, and a base-line for monitoring, management, and exploration. Coffee Atlas of Ethiopia will be the essential reference for resource managers, researchers, conservationists, coffee exporters and importers, and coffee lovers.
Political Science

The Death of Truth

Notes on Falsehood in the Age of Trump

Author: Michiko Kakutani

Publisher: Tim Duggan Books

ISBN: 0525574840

Category: Political Science

Page: 208

View: 5372

NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER NEW YORK TIMES Editors' Choice From the Pulitzer Prize-winning critic comes an impassioned critique of America’s retreat from reason We live in a time when the very idea of objective truth is mocked and discounted by the occupants of the White House. Discredited conspiracy theories and ideologies have resurfaced, proven science is once more up for debate, and Russian propaganda floods our screens. The wisdom of the crowd has usurped research and expertise, and we are each left clinging to the beliefs that best confirm our biases. How did truth become an endangered species in contemporary America? This decline began decades ago, and in The Death of Truth, former New York Times critic Michiko Kakutani takes a penetrating look at the cultural forces that contributed to this gathering storm. In social media and literature, television, academia, and politics, Kakutani identifies the trends—originating on both the right and the left—that have combined to elevate subjectivity over factuality, science, and common values. And she returns us to the words of the great critics of authoritarianism, writers like George Orwell and Hannah Arendt, whose work is newly and eerily relevant. With remarkable erudition and insight, Kakutani offers a provocative diagnosis of our current condition and points toward a new path for our truth-challenged times.