Political Science

Supreme Conflict

The Inside Story of the Struggle for Control of the United States Supreme Court

Author: Jan Crawford Greenburg

Publisher: Penguin

ISBN: 9781594201011

Category: Political Science

Page: 340

View: 1494

Discusses recent ideological shifts within the Supreme Court, profiles controversial judges, and analyzes the changing role of judicial power in American government.
Political Science

Summary: Supreme Conflict

Review and Analysis of Jan Crawford Greenburg's Book

Author: BusinessNews Publishing

Publisher: Primento

ISBN: 2511001713

Category: Political Science

Page: 44

View: 8101

The must-read summary of Jan Crawford Greenburg's book: “Supreme Conflict: The Inside Story of the struggle for Control of the United States Supreme Court”. This complete summary of "Supreme Conflict" by Jan Crawford Greenburg, a renowned American journalist and lawyer, presents her account of the intense , cultural, political battles that have been fought in the most powerful circles of the nation over the composition of the US Supreme Court. She also examines the selection process from inside the White House. Added-value of this summary: • Save time • Understand the power struggles for control of the Supreme Court • Expand your knowledge of American politics and the judicial system To learn more, read "Supreme Conflict" and discover how politics can interfere with the objectivity of the Supreme Court and the implications this has.
Language Arts & Disciplines

The Supreme Court and the Press

The Indispensable Conflict

Author: Joe Mathewson

Publisher: Northwestern University Press

ISBN: 0810126214

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 501

View: 5985

Throughout its history, the Supreme Court has had a contentious relationship with the press. Yet, as Joe Mathewson shows, the Court and the Press provide crucial services for each other as well: the press educates the public about the Court's actions, and the court is charged withe protecting the freedoms on which the press relies. In The Supreme Court and the press, Mathewson charts the history of this complex dynamic, from the court's early neglect of the First Amendment through the press's coverage of today's most controversial cases. With this history in mind, Mathewson brings his expertise as a Journalist and lawyer to bear in offering a diagnosis of the current situation, as well as offering solutions to the present shortcomings in the relationship between these two essential institutions.
Political Science

A Citizen’s Guide to the Constitution and the Supreme Court

Constitutional Conflict in American Politics

Author: Morgan Marietta

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1135015317

Category: Political Science

Page: 204

View: 8041

The U.S. Constitution is a blueprint for a free society as well as a source of enduring conflict over how that society must be governed. The competing ways of reading our founding document shape the decisions of the Supreme Court, which acts as the final voice on constitutional questions. This breezy, concise guide explains the central conflicts that frame our constitutional controversies, written in clear non-academic language to serve as a resource for engaged citizens, both inside and outside of an academic setting. After covering the main points of conflict in constitutional law, Marietta gives readers an overview of the perspectives from the leading schools of constititional interpretation--textualism, common law constitutionalism, originalism, and living constitutionalism. He then walks through the points of conflict and competing schools of thought in the context of several landmark cases and ends with advice to readers on how to interpret constitutional issues ourselves.
Law

The Schoolhouse Gate

Public Education, the Supreme Court, and the Battle for the American Mind

Author: Justin Driver

Publisher: Pantheon

ISBN: 1101871660

Category: Law

Page: 544

View: 9491

An award-winning constitutional law scholar at the University of Chicago (who clerked for Judge Merrick B. Garland, Justice Stephen Breyer, and Justice Sandra Day O’Connor) gives us an engaging and alarming book that aims to vindicate the rights of public school stu­dents, which have so often been undermined by the Supreme Court in recent decades. Judicial decisions assessing the constitutional rights of students in the nation’s public schools have consistently generated bitter controversy. From racial segregation to un­authorized immigration, from antiwar protests to compul­sory flag salutes, from economic inequality to teacher-led prayer—these are but a few of the cultural anxieties dividing American society that the Supreme Court has addressed in elementary and secondary schools. The Schoolhouse Gate gives a fresh, lucid, and provocative account of the historic legal battles waged over education and illuminates contemporary disputes that continue to fracture the nation. Justin Driver maintains that since the 1970s the Supreme Court has regularly abdicated its responsibility for protecting students’ constitutional rights and risked trans­forming public schools into Constitution-free zones. Students deriving lessons about citizenship from the Court’s decisions in recent decades would conclude that the following actions taken by educators pass constitutional muster: inflicting severe corporal punishment on students without any proce­dural protections, searching students and their possessions without probable cause in bids to uncover violations of school rules, random drug testing of students who are not suspected of wrongdoing, and suppressing student speech for the view­point it espouses. Taking their cue from such decisions, lower courts have upheld a wide array of dubious school actions, including degrading strip searches, repressive dress codes, draconian “zero tolerance” disciplinary policies, and severe restrictions on off-campus speech. Driver surveys this legal landscape with eloquence, highlights the gripping personal narratives behind landmark clashes, and warns that the repeated failure to honor students’ rights threatens our basic constitutional order. This magiste­rial book will make it impossible to view American schools—or America itself—in the same way again.
History

Battle for Justice

How the Bork Nomination Shook America

Author: Ethan Bronner

Publisher: Sterling Publishing Company

ISBN: 9781402752278

Category: History

Page: 390

View: 7039

An affecting testimonial to the bond between American soldiers in Vietnam and their canine helpers, A Soldier's Best Friend is veteran John C. Burnam's account of his tenure as a scout dog handler patrolling the jungles of Vietnam with his German shepherd, Clipper, at his side. There were 10,000 soldiers in Vietnam like Burnam, accompanied by these intelligent, adaptable scout dogs. Between hazardous missions, the dogs were loving, playful friends who shared the lives of their human squadmates, while in the combat zone they were all business. Routinely braving danger, the canines searched for injured GIs, probed for potentially lethal booby traps, located underground weapons caches and warned of approaching enemy attacks and ambushes. So valuable was the dogs' service that the Viet Cong offered a hefty bounty for their lives. Despite their heroism, many of these dogs were abandoned at the conflict's end, left to fend for themselves. Since the 1990s, this book has had two runs as a self-published book, and one as a trade title, with all three of these print runs selling out.
History

A History of the Supreme Court

Author: Bernard Schwartz

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780195093872

Category: History

Page: 465

View: 6307

A comprehensive history of the United States Supreme Court from its ill-esteemed beginning in 1790 to one of the most important and controversial branches of the Federal government.
Juvenile Nonfiction

McCulloch V. Maryland

When State and Federal Powers Conflict

Author: Bonnie Pettifor,Charles E. Petit

Publisher: Enslow Pub Incorporated

ISBN: 9780766018877

Category: Juvenile Nonfiction

Page: 128

View: 7328

Examines the Supreme Court case of 1819 in which the issue of state right came to bear on banking practices of the Bank of the United States in Maryland.

Supreme Court

Author: N.A

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category:

Page: N.A

View: 1019

History

Tested by Zion

The Bush Administration and the Israeli-Palestinian Conflict

Author: Elliott Abrams

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1107311357

Category: History

Page: N.A

View: 8635

This book tells the full inside story of the Bush Administration and the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. Written by a top National Security Council officer who worked at the White House with Bush, Cheney, and Rice and attended dozens of meetings with figures like Sharon, Mubarak, the kings of Jordan and Saudi Arabia, and Palestinian leaders, it brings the reader inside the White House and the palaces of Middle Eastern officials. How did 9/11 change American policy toward Arafat and Sharon's tough efforts against the Second Intifada? What influence did the Saudis have on President Bush? Did the American approach change when Arafat died? How did Sharon decide to get out of Gaza, and why did the peace negotiations fail? In the first book by an administration official to focus on Bush and the Middle East, Elliott Abrams brings the story of Bush, the Israelis, and the Palestinians to life.
Social Science

The Conflict

How Modern Motherhood Undermines the Status of Women

Author: Elisabeth Badinter

Publisher: Metropolitan Books

ISBN: 1429996919

Category: Social Science

Page: 224

View: 707

In the pathbreaking tradition of Backlash and The Time Bind, The Conflict, a #1 European bestseller, identifies a surprising setback to women's freedom: progressive modern motherhood Elisabeth Badinter has for decades been in the vanguard of the European fight for women's equality. Now, in an explosive new book, she points her finger at a most unlikely force undermining the status of women: liberal motherhood, in thrall to all that is "natural." Attachment parenting, co-sleeping, baby-wearing, and especially breast-feeding—these hallmarks of contemporary motherhood have succeeded in tethering women to the home and family to an extent not seen since the 1950s. Badinter argues that the taboos now surrounding epidurals, formula, disposable diapers, cribs—and anything that distracts a mother's attention from her offspring—have turned childrearing into a singularly regressive force. In sharp, engaging prose, Badinter names a reactionary shift that is intensely felt but has not been clearly articulated until now, a shift that America has pioneered. She reserves special ire for the orthodoxy of the La Leche League—an offshoot of conservative Evangelicalism—showing how on-demand breastfeeding, with all its limitations, curtails women's choices. Moreover, the pressure to provide children with 24/7 availability and empathy has produced a generation of overwhelmed and guilt-laden mothers—one cause of the West's alarming decline in birthrate. A bestseller in Europe, The Conflict is a scathing indictment of a stealthy zealotry that cheats women of their full potential.
Technology & Engineering

Wired for War

The Robotics Revolution and Conflict in the 21st Century

Author: P. W. Singer

Publisher: Penguin

ISBN: 9781440685972

Category: Technology & Engineering

Page: 512

View: 1972

P. W. Singer explores the great­est revolution in military affairs since the atom bomb: the dawn of robotic warfare We are on the cusp of a massive shift in military technology that threatens to make real the stuff of I, Robot and The Terminator. Blending historical evidence with interviews of an amaz­ing cast of characters, Singer shows how technology is changing not just how wars are fought, but also the politics, economics, laws, and the ethics that surround war itself. Travelling from the battlefields of Iraq and Afghanistan to modern-day "skunk works" in the midst of suburbia, Wired for War will tantalise a wide readership, from military buffs to policy wonks to gearheads.
Biography & Autobiography

Young Thurgood

The Making of a Supreme Court Justice

Author: Larry S. Gibson

Publisher: Prometheus Books

ISBN: 1616145722

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 413

View: 6864

Thurgood Marshall was the most important American lawyer of the twentieth century. He transformed the nation's legal landscape by challenging the racial segregation that had relegated millions to second-class citizenship. He won twenty-nine of thirty-three cases before the United States Supreme Court, was a federal appeals court judge, served as the US solicitor general, and, for twenty-four years, sat on the Supreme Court. Marshall is best known for achievements after he relocated to New York in 1936 to work for the NAACP. But Marshall's personality, attitudes, priorities, and work habits had crystallized during earlier years in Maryland. This work is the first close examination of the formative period in Marshall's life. As the authorn shows, Thurgood Marshall was a fascinating man of contrasts. He fought for racial justice without becoming a racist. Simultaneously idealistic and pragmatic, Marshall was a passionate advocate, yet he maintained friendly relationships with his opponents. Young Thurgood reveals how Marshall's distinctive traits were molded by events, people, and circumstances early in his life. Professor Gibson presents fresh information about Marshall's family, youth, and education. He describes Marshall's key mentors, the special impact of his high school and college competitive debating, his struggles to establish a law practice during the Great Depression, and his first civil rights cases. The author sheds new light on the NAACP and its first lawsuits in the campaign that led to the 1954 Brown v. Board of Education school desegregation decision. He also corrects some of the often-repeated stories about Marshall that are inaccurate. The only biography of Thurgood Marshall to be endorsed by Marshall’s immediate family, Young Thurgood is an exhaustively researched and engagingly written work that everyone interested in law, civil rights, American history, and biography will want to read. From the Hardcover edition.
Religion

Confronting Without Offending

Positive and Practical Steps to Resolving Conflict

Author: Deborah Smith Pegues

Publisher: Harvest House Publishers

ISBN: 0736932569

Category: Religion

Page: 192

View: 4808

Where there are people, there are disagreements and misunderstandings. The author of 30 Days to Taming Your Tongue (more than 500,000 copies sold), a popular speaker, and a relationship strategist, Deborah Smith Pegues draws on biblical principles, personal experience, and research to show how to approach difficult situations so relationships are strengthened rather than broken. Meeting face-to-face to resolve an issue is difficult, but Pegues makes it easier by revealing how to avoid complications, sharing examples of good communication, and offering specific steps for dealing with conflicts. Readers will discover: effective and compassionate techniques for handling conflict practical strategies for resolving conflict how personality types influence discussions suggestions for minimizing defensiveness ideas for developing and promoting cooperation Confronting Without Offending gives readers the tools to successfully talk over and resolve issues and misunderstandings at home, at work, and in social situations.
Political Science

Packing the Court

The Rise of Judicial Power and the Coming Crisis of the Supreme Court

Author: James Macgregor Burns

Publisher: Penguin

ISBN: 1101081902

Category: Political Science

Page: 336

View: 8163

From renowned political theorist James MacGregor Burns, an incisive critique of the overreaching power of an ideological Supreme Court For decades, Pulitzer Prize-winner James MacGregor Burns has been one of the great masters of the study of power and leadership in America. In Packing the Court, he turns his eye to the U.S. Supreme Court, an institution that he believes has become more powerful, and more partisan, than the founding fathers ever intended. In a compelling and provocative narrative, Burns reveals how the Supreme Court has served as a reactionary force in American politics at critical moments throughout the nation's history, and concludes with a bold proposal to rein in the court's power.
Political Science

A People's History of the Supreme Court

The Men and Women Whose Cases and Decisions Have Shaped OurConstitution: Revised Edition

Author: Peter Irons

Publisher: Penguin

ISBN: 9781101503133

Category: Political Science

Page: 576

View: 4562

A comprehensive history of the people and cases that have changed history, this is the definitive account of the nation's highest court Recent changes in the Supreme Court have placed the venerable institution at the forefront of current affairs, making this comprehensive and engaging work as timely as ever. In the tradition of Howard Zinn's classic A People's History of the United States, Peter Irons chronicles the decisions that have influenced virtually every aspect of our society, from the debates over judicial power to controversial rulings in the past regarding slavery, racial segregation, and abortion, as well as more current cases about school prayer, the Bush/Gore election results, and "enemy combatants." To understand key issues facing the supreme court and the current battle for the court's ideological makeup, there is no better guide than Peter Irons. This revised and updated edition includes a foreword by Howard Zinn. "A sophisticated narrative history of the Supreme Court . . . [Irons] breathes abundant life into old documents and reminds readers that today's fiercest arguments about rights are the continuation of the endless American conversation." -Publisher's Weekly (starred review)
Political Science

Reaction and accommodation

the United States Supreme Court and political conflict, 1809-1835

Author: Dwight Wiley Jessup

Publisher: Dissertations-G

ISBN: N.A

Category: Political Science

Page: 484

View: 3186

Law

Legal Reasoning and Political Conflict

Author: Cass R. Sunstein

Publisher: Oxford University Press on Demand

ISBN: 0195100824

Category: Law

Page: 220

View: 2676

One of the nation's leading commentators on legal issues offers a new interpretation of the role of the law in a diverse society, arguing that the courts should avoid large, abstract issues and focus on practical solutions to particular cases. UP.
Political Science

Active Liberty

Interpreting Our Democratic Constitution

Author: Stephen Breyer

Publisher: Vintage

ISBN: 9780307424617

Category: Political Science

Page: 176

View: 9175

A brilliant new approach to the Constitution and courts of the United States by Supreme Court Justice Stephen Breyer.For Justice Breyer, the Constitution’s primary role is to preserve and encourage what he calls “active liberty”: citizen participation in shaping government and its laws. As this book argues, promoting active liberty requires judicial modesty and deference to Congress; it also means recognizing the changing needs and demands of the populace. Indeed, the Constitution’s lasting brilliance is that its principles may be adapted to cope with unanticipated situations, and Breyer makes a powerful case against treating it as a static guide intended for a world that is dead and gone. Using contemporary examples from federalism to privacy to affirmative action, this is a vital contribution to the ongoing debate over the role and power of our courts. From the Trade Paperback edition.