Nature

Swamplife

People, Gators, and Mangroves Entangled in the Everglades

Author: Laura Ogden

Publisher: U of Minnesota Press

ISBN: 9780816670277

Category: Nature

Page: 185

View: 9765

Alligator hunters, mangroves, and the (mis)adventures of the Ashley Gang in the Florida Everglades.
Electronic books

Swamplife

People, Gators, and Mangroves Entangled in the Everglades

Author: Laura Ogden

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9780816677023

Category: Electronic books

Page: 204

View: 2622

Alligator hunters, mangroves, and the (mis)adventures of the Ashley Gang in the Florida Everglades.
Social Science

Colonialism and Landscape

Postcolonial Theory and Applications

Author: Andrew Sluyter

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield

ISBN: 9780742515604

Category: Social Science

Page: 267

View: 9723

Spurred by the dramatic landscape transformation associated with European colonization of the Americas, this work creates a prototype theory to explain relationships between colonialism and landscape.
Science

Reigning the River

Urban Ecologies and Political Transformation in Kathmandu

Author: Anne Rademacher

Publisher: Duke University Press Books

ISBN: 9780822350804

Category: Science

Page: 264

View: 9945

A major contribution to the nascent anthropology of urban environments, Reigning the River illuminates the complexities of river restoration in Kathmandu, Nepal’s capital and one of the fastest-growing cities in South Asia. In this rich ethnography, Anne M. Rademacher explores the ways that urban riverscape improvement involved multiple actors, each constructing ideals of restoration through contested histories and ideologies of belonging. She examines competing understandings of river restoration, particularly among bureaucrats in state and conservation-development agencies, cultural heritage activists, and advocates for the security of tens of thousands of rural-to-urban migrants settled along the exposed riverbed. Rademacher conducted research during a volatile period in Nepal’s political history. As clashes between Maoist revolutionaries and the government intensified, the riverscape became a site of competing claims to a capital city that increasingly functioned as a last refuge from war-related violence. In this time of intense flux, efforts to ensure, create, or imagine ecological stability intersected with aspirations for political stability. Throughout her analysis, Rademacher emphasizes ecology as an important site of dislocation, entitlement, and cultural meaning.
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS

New Ecologies for the Twenty-First Century

Author: Associate Professor of Political Science Arun Agrawal

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9780822386421

Category: BUSINESS & ECONOMICS

Page: 345

View: 8163

Annotation In Kumaon in northern India, villagers set hundreds of forest fires in the early 1920s, protesting the colonial British state's regulations to protect the environment. Yet by the 1990s, they had begun to conserve their forests carefully. In his innovative historical and political study, Arun Agrawal analyzes this striking transformation. He describes and explains the emergence of environmental identities and changes in state-locality relations and shows how the two are related. In so doing, he demonstrates that scholarship on common property, political ecology, and feminist environmentalism can be combined--in an approach he calls environmentality--to better understand changes in conservation efforts. Such an understanding is relevant far beyond Kumaon: local populations in more than fifty countries are engaged in similar efforts to protect their environmental resources.Agrawal brings environment and development studies, new institutional economics, and Foucauldian theories of power and subjectivity to bear on his ethnographical and historical research. He visited nearly forty villages in Kumaon, where he assessed the state of village forests, interviewed hundreds of Kumaonis, and examined local records. Drawing on his extensive fieldwork and archival research, he shows how decentralization strategies change relations between states and localities, community decision makers and common residents, and individuals and the environment. In exploring these changes and their significance, Agrawal establishes that theories of environmental politics are enriched by attention to the interconnections between power, knowledge, institutions, and subjectivities.
History

Sensitive Space

Fragmented Territory at the India-Bangladesh Border

Author: Jason Cons

Publisher: University of Washington Press

ISBN: 0295806540

Category: History

Page: 224

View: 5393

Enclaves along the India-Bangladesh border have posed conceptual and pragmatic challenges to both states since Partition in 1947. These pieces of India inside of Bangladesh, and vice versa, are spaces in which national security, belonging, and control are shown in sharp relief. Through ethnographic and historical analysis, Jason Cons argues that these spaces are key locations for rethinking the production of territory in South Asia today. Sensitive Space examines the ways that these areas mark a range of anxieties over territory, land, and national survival and lead us to consider why certain places emerge as contentious, and often violent, spaces at the margins of nation and state. Offering lessons for the study of enclaves, lines of control, restricted areas, gray spaces, and other geographic anomalies, Sensitive Space develops frameworks for understanding the persistent confusions of land, community, and belonging in border zones. It further provides ways to think past the categories of sovereignty and identity to reimagine territory in South Asia and beyond.
Social Science

The Drug Company Next Door

Pollution, Jobs, and Community Health in Puerto Rico

Author: Alexa S. Dietrich

Publisher: NYU Press

ISBN: 0814724736

Category: Social Science

Page: 231

View: 4462

The production of pharmaceuticals is among the most profitable industries on the planet. Drug companies produce chemical substances that can save, extend, or substantially improve the quality of human life. However, even as the companies present themselves publicly as health and environmental stewards, their factories are a significant source of air and water pollution--toxic to people and the environment. In Puerto Rico, the pharmaceutical industry is the backbone of the island’s economy: in one small town alone, there are over a dozen drug factories representing five multinationals, the highest concentration per capita of such factories in the world. It is a place where the enforcement of environmental regulations and the public trust they ensure are often violated in the name of economic development. The Drug Company Next Door unites the concerns of critical medical anthropology with those of political ecology, investigating the multi-faceted role of pharmaceutical corporations as polluters, economic providers, and social actors. Rather than simply demonizing the drug companies, the volume explores the dynamics involved in their interactions with the local community and discusses the strategies used by both individuals and community groups to deal with the consequences of pollution. The Drug Company Next Door puts a human face on a growing set of problems for communities around the world. Accessible and engaging, the book encourages readers to think critically about the role of corporations in everyday life, health, and culture.
Science

Removing Mountains

Extracting Nature and Identity in the Appalachian Coalfields

Author: Rebecca R. Scott

Publisher: U of Minnesota Press

ISBN: 0816665990

Category: Science

Page: 271

View: 5203

An ethnography of coal country in southern West Virginia.
Social Science

The Geographies of Social Movements

Afro-Colombian Mobilization and the Aquatic Space

Author: Ulrich Oslender

Publisher: Duke University Press

ISBN: 0822374404

Category: Social Science

Page: 304

View: 6505

In The Geographies of Social Movements Ulrich Oslender proposes a critical place perspective to examine the activism of black communities in the lowland rain forest of Colombia's Pacific Coast region. Drawing on extensive ethnographic fieldwork in and around the town of Guapi, Oslender examines how the work of local community councils, which have organized around newly granted ethnic and land rights since the early 1990s, is anchored to space and place. Exploring how residents' social relationships are entangled with the region's rivers, streams, swamps, rain, and tides, Oslender argues that this "aquatic space"—his conceptualization of the mutually constitutive relationships between people and their rain forest environment—provides a local epistemology that has shaped the political process. Oslender demonstrates that social mobilization among Colombia's Pacific Coast black communities is best understood as emerging out of their place-based identity and environmental imaginaries. He argues that the critical place perspective proposed accounts more fully for the multiple, multiscalar, rooted, and networked experiences within social movements.
Social Science

Tourist Attractions

Performing Race and Masculinity in Brazil's Sexual Economy

Author: Gregory Mitchell

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 022630924X

Category: Social Science

Page: 272

View: 2050

While much attention has been paid in recent years to heterosexual prostitution and sex tourism in Brazil, gay sex tourism has been almost completely overlooked. In Tourist Attractions, Gregory C. Mitchell presents a pioneering ethnography that focuses on the personal lives and identities of male sex workers who occupy a variety of roles in Brazil’s sexual economy. Mitchell takes us into the bath houses of Rio de Janeiro, where rent boys cruise for clients, and to the beaches of Salvador da Bahia, where African American gay men seek out hustlers while exploring cultural heritage tourist sites. His ethnography stretches into the Amazon, where indigenous fantasies are tinged with the erotic at eco-resorts, and into the homes of “kept men,” who forge long-term, long-distance, transnational relationships that blur the boundaries of what counts as commercial sex. Mitchell asks how tourists perceive sex workers’ performances of Brazilianness, race, and masculinity, and, in turn, how these two groups of men make sense of differing models of racial and sexual identity across cultural boundaries. He proposes that in order to better understand how people experience difference sexually, we reframe prostitution—which Marxist feminists have long conceptualized as sexual labor—as also being a form of performative labor. Tourist Attractions is an exceptional ethnography poised to make an indelible impact in the fields of anthropology, gender, and sexuality, and research on prostitution and tourism.
Nature

The Everglades

An Environmental History

Author: David McCally

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9780813018270

Category: Nature

Page: 215

View: 9449

Discusses the formation, development, and history of the Everglades
Biography & Autobiography

The Invisible Element of Place

The Architecture of David Salmela

Author: Larry Millett,Thomas Fisher,David Salmela

Publisher: U of Minnesota Press

ISBN: 9781452939117

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 241

View: 3116

Nonstop suspense unfolds as Sherlock Holmes and Dr. Watson travel from London to New York to Chicago in pursuit of a vicious and cunning killer
Business & Economics

Down and Out in the New Economy

How People Find (or Don’t Find) Work Today

Author: Ilana Gershon

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 022645228X

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 304

View: 514

Finding a job used to be simple. You’d show up at an office and ask for an application. A friend would mention a job in their department. Or you’d see an ad in a newspaper and send in your cover letter. Maybe you’d call the company a week later to check in, but the basic approach was easy. And once you got a job, you would stay—often for decades. Now . . . well, it’s complicated. If you want to have a shot at a good job, you need to have a robust profile on LinkdIn. And an enticing personal brand. Or something like that—contemporary how-to books tend to offer contradictory advice. But they agree on one thing: in today’s economy, you can’t just be an employee looking to get hired—you have to market yourself as a business, one that can help another business achieve its goals. That’s a radical transformation in how we think about work and employment, says Ilana Gershon. And with Down and Out in the New Economy, she digs deep into that change and what it means, not just for job seekers, but for businesses and our very culture. In telling her story, Gershon covers all parts of the employment spectrum: she interviews hiring managers about how they assess candidates; attends personal branding seminars; talks with managers at companies around the United States to suss out regional differences—like how Silicon Valley firms look askance at the lengthier employment tenures of applicants from the Midwest. And she finds that not everything has changed: though the technological trappings may be glitzier, in a lot of cases, who you know remains more important than what you know. Throughout, Gershon keeps her eye on bigger questions, interested not in what lessons job-seekers can take—though there are plenty of those here—but on what it means to consider yourself a business. What does that blurring of personal and vocational lives do to our sense of our selves, the economy, our communities? Though it’s often dressed up in the language of liberation, is this approach actually disempowering workers at the expense of corporations? Rich in the voices of people deeply involved with all parts of the employment process, Down and Out in the New Economy offers a snapshot of the quest for work today—and a pointed analysis of its larger meaning.
Nature

Green Wars

Conservation and Decolonization in the Maya Forest

Author: Megan Ybarra

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 0520968034

Category: Nature

Page: 216

View: 1005

Global conservation efforts are celebrated for saving Guatemala’s Maya Forest. This book reveals that the process of protecting lands has been one of racialized dispossession for the Indigenous peoples who live there. Through careful ethnography and archival research, Megan Ybarra shows how conservation efforts have turned Q’eqchi’ Mayas into immigrants on their own land, and how this is part of a larger national effort to make Indigenous peoples into neoliberal citizens. Even as Q’eqchi’s participate in conservation, Green Wars amplifies their call for material decolonization by recognizing the relationship between Indigenous peoples and the land itself.
Science

Political Ecology

A Critical Introduction

Author: Paul Robbins

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 0470657324

Category: Science

Page: 288

View: 7705

Political ecology is a field that seeks to make sustainable outcomes more possible and imaginable, but also to critique and undermine the foundations of environmental injustice and destruction - from the wetland shores of the Gulf of Mexico and the forests of India to the slums of Tijuana and the suburbs of Arizona. Written in clear and straightforward language and fully updated in the light of recent events, this new edition of Political Ecology presents the core concepts, central thinkers, and key works of a fast-growing and highly eclectic field. Using urban and rural examples from both the developed and underdeveloped world, the book provides the first full history of the development of political ecology over the last century and considers the major challenges facing the field now and for the future. With study boxes, a range of illustrations, and new material throughout, this second edition argues that this urgent field, though chaotically diverse, is unified by a loose community of practice and by a certain kind of text, writing, and argument.
Science

How Forests Think

Toward an Anthropology Beyond the Human

Author: Eduardo Kohn

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 0520276108

Category: Science

Page: 267

View: 6615

Can forests think? Do dogs dream? In this astonishing book, Eduardo Kohn challenges the very foundations of anthropology, calling into question our central assumptions about what it means to be human—and thus distinct from all other life forms. Based on four years of fieldwork among the Runa of Ecuador’s Upper Amazon, Eduardo Kohn draws on his rich ethnography to explore how Amazonians interact with the many creatures that inhabit one of the world’s most complex ecosystems. Whether or not we recognize it, our anthropological tools hinge on those capacities that make us distinctly human. However, when we turn our ethnographic attention to how we relate to other kinds of beings, these tools (which have the effect of divorcing us from the rest of the world) break down. How Forests Think seizes on this breakdown as an opportunity. Avoiding reductionistic solutions, and without losing sight of how our lives and those of others are caught up in the moral webs we humans spin, this book skillfully fashions new kinds of conceptual tools from the strange and unexpected properties of the living world itself. In this groundbreaking work, Kohn takes anthropology in a new and exciting direction–one that offers a more capacious way to think about the world we share with other kinds of beings.
Science

World Regions in Global Context

Peoples, Places, and Environments

Author: Sallie A. Marston,Paul L. Knox,Diana M. Liverman,Vincent Del Casino Jr.,Paul F. Robbins

Publisher: Pearson

ISBN: 0134262883

Category: Science

Page: 480

View: 2189

For courses in world regional geography. Conceptual Exploration of World Regions and the Myriad Issues Critical to Geography Today World Regions in Global Context presents a strong global sensibility and an emphasis on current events, with examples of interdependent development, spatial and social inequality, and questions of spatial justice. The authors maintain that regions are the outcomes of the twin forces of globalization and regionalization. Therefore, each regional chapter stresses the global systems of connection that drive unique regional processes, making regions different. By studying regions, students not only learn the critical elements of different places, but also come to understand the fundamental processes that drive change. The 6th Edition is a briefer, more visual text that still maintains its conceptual rigor by addressing today’s critical geographic themes, incorporating deeper focus on sustainability issues, new human stories from the regions, cutting-edge data visualizations and infographics, including a completely modernized cartography program, and much more. Also Available with Mastering Geography This title is also available with Mastering™ Geography--an online homework, tutorial, and assessment program designed to work with this text to engage students and improve results. Interactive, self-paced tutorials provide individualized coaching to help students stay on track. With a wide range of activities available, students can actively learn, understand, and retain even the most difficult concepts. Note: You are purchasing a standalone product; Mastering Geography does not come packaged with this content. Students, if interested in purchasing this title with Mastering Geography, ask your instructor for the correct package ISBN and Course ID. Instructors, contact your Pearson representative for more information. If you would like to purchase both the physical text and Mastering Geography, search for: 0134182723 / 9780134182728 World Regions in Global Context: Peoples, Places, and Environments Plus Mastering Geography with eText -- Access Card Package Package consists of: 0134183649 / 9780134183640 World Regions in Global Context: Peoples, Places, and Environments 0134153669 / 9780134153667 Mastering Geography with Pearson eText -- ValuePack Access Card -- for World Regions in Global Context: Peoples, Places, and Environments World Regions in Global Context , 6th Edition is also available via Pearson eText, a simple-to-use, mobile, personalized reading experience that lets instructors connect with and motivate students — right in their eTextbook. Learn more.
Science

Footprints in Paradise

Ecotourism, Local Knowledge, and Nature Therapies in Okinawa

Author: Andrea E. Murray

Publisher: Berghahn Books

ISBN: 1785333860

Category: Science

Page: 186

View: 6335

The economic imperative of sustainable tourism development frequently shapes life on small subtropical islands. In Okinawa, ecotourism promises to provide employment for a dwindling population of rural youth while preserving the natural environment and bolstering regional pride. Footprints in Paradise explores the transformation in community and sense of place as Okinawans come to view themselves through the lens of the visiting tourist consumer, and as their language, landscapes, and wildlife are reconstituted as treasured and vulnerable resources. The rediscovery and revaluing of local ecological knowledge strengthens Okinawan or Uchinaa cultural heritage, despite the controversial presence of US military bases amidst a hegemonic Japanese state.
Political Science

Brand Aid

Shopping Well to Save the World

Author: Lisa Ann Richey,Stefano Ponte

Publisher: U of Minnesota Press

ISBN: 0816665451

Category: Political Science

Page: 253

View: 1525

A critical account of the rise of celebrity-driven “compassionate consumption.”
History

Remapping Bolivia

Resources, Territory, and Indigeneity in a Plurinational State

Author: Nicole Fabricant

Publisher: School for Advanced Research on the

ISBN: 9781934691519

Category: History

Page: 251

View: 590