History

The Cambridge History of Medieval Political Thought C.350-c.1450

Author: J. H. Burns,James Henderson Burns

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9780521423885

Category: History

Page: 808

View: 4011

This volume examines the history of a complex and varied body of ideas over a period of more than a thousand years.
History

The Cambridge History of Political Thought 1450-1700

Author: J. H. Burns

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9780521477727

Category: History

Page: 798

View: 5855

This book, first published in 1992, presents a comprehensive scholarly account of the development of European political thinking through the Renaissance and the reformation to the 'scientific revolution' and political upheavals of the seventeenth century. It is written by a highly distinguished team of contributors.
History

A History of Medieval Political Thought

300–1450

Author: N.A

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1136623353

Category: History

Page: 280

View: 7398

First Published in 2005. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.
History

The Cambridge History of Twentieth-Century Political Thought

Author: Terence Ball,Richard Bellamy

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9780521563543

Category: History

Page: 754

View: 6701

A comprehensive overview of the development of political thought to the end of the twentieth century, first published in 2003.
Philosophy

The Cambridge History of Greek and Roman Political Thought

Author: Christopher Rowe

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9780521481366

Category: Philosophy

Page: 745

View: 2342

This volume is the first general and comprehensive treatment of the political thought of ancient Greece and Rome ever to be published in English. It covers Plato and Aristotle at length, but also a host of other major and minor thinkers, from Thucydides and the Greek dramatists to Cicero and early Christian writers. It attempts both historical and philosophical assessment of the writers discussed and quotes them generously in translation. It will take its place as a standard work essential for scholars and students of classics, history, philosophy and theology.
History

Political Thought in Europe, 1250-1450

Author: Antony Black

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9780521386098

Category: History

Page: 211

View: 4536

The period c.1250-1450 ("the later Middle Ages") was seminal for the values of the modern world. State sovereignty, the separation of church and state, representation, the popular origin of government, and property rights are just a few of the ideas formulated during this time. Political Thought in Europe provides a lucid and accessible introduction to the period in the round, covering both major thinkers such as Aquinas, Marsiglio, Ockham, Wyclif and Cusa, and prevalent notions of church and state, empire and local sovereignty, civic and communal self-government, kingship, "the people", parliament, the law and experts ("the wise"). This is the first overall account to use recent advances in the methodology of the history of ideas.
Political Science

Jesuit Political Thought

The Society of Jesus and the State, c.1540–1630

Author: Harro Höpfl

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9781139452427

Category: Political Science

Page: N.A

View: 4493

Harro Höpfl presents here a full-length study of the single most influential organized group of scholars and pamphleteers in early modern Europe (1540–1630), namely the Jesuits. He explores the academic and political controversies in which they were engaged in and their contribution to academic discourse around ideas of 'the state' and 'politics'. He pays particular attention to their actual teaching concerning doctrines for whose menacing practical implications Jesuits generally were vilified: notably tyrannicide, the papal power to depose rulers, the legitimacy of 'Machiavellian' policies in dealing with heretics and the justifiability of breaking faith with heretics. Höpfl further explores the paradox of the Jesuits' political activities being at once the subject of conspiratorial fantasies but at the same time being widely acknowledged as among the foremost intellects of their time, with their thought freely cited and appropriated. This is an important work of scholarship.
History

A History of Medieval Political Thought

300–1450

Author: N.A

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1136623426

Category: History

Page: 280

View: 1007

First Published in 2005. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.
History

The Common Good in Late Medieval Political Thought

Author: M. S. Kempshall

Publisher: Oxford University Press on Demand

ISBN: 9780198207160

Category: History

Page: 401

View: 3053

This study offers a major reinterpretation of medieval political thought by examining one of its most fundamental ideas. If it was axiomatic that the goal of human society should be the common good, then this notion presented at least two conceptual alternatives. Did it embody the highest moral ideals of happiness and the life of virtue, or did it represent the more pragmatic benefits of peace and material security? Political thinkers from Thomas Aquinas to William of Ockham answered thisquestion in various contexts. In theoretical terms, they were reacting to the rediscovery of Aristotle's Politics and Ethics, an event often seen as pivotal in the history of political thought. On a practical level, they were faced with pressing concerns over the exercise of both temporal and ecclesiastical authority - resistance to royal taxation and opposition to the jurisdiction of the pope. In establishing the connections between these different contexts, The Common Good questions the identification of Aristotle as the primary catalyst for the emergence of 'the individual' and a 'secular' theory of the state. Through a detailed exposition of scholastic political theology, it argues that the roots of any such developments should be traced, instead, to Augustine and the Bible.
History

Tudor Protestant Political Thought 1547-1603

Author: Stephen A. Chavura

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN: 9004209689

Category: History

Page: 272

View: 4138

This study examines themes in the political ideas of Episcopalian, Puritan, and Separatist authors from the reign of Edward VI until the death of Elizabeth I. Cosmic harmony, providentialism, natural law, absolutism, and government by consent are examined in the context of the theological, political, and social upheavals of the Reformation period.
History

The Cambridge History of Eighteenth-Century Political Thought

Author: Mark Goldie,Robert Wokler

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9780521374224

Category: History

Page: 919

View: 9931

A comprehensive overview of the development of political thought during the European enlightenment.
Political Science

The Cambridge History of Nineteenth-Century Political Thought

Author: Gareth Stedman Jones,Gregory Claeys

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9781107676329

Category: Political Science

Page: 1162

View: 5816

This major work of academic reference provides the first comprehensive survey of political thought in Europe, North America and Asia in the century following the French Revolution. Written by a distinguished team of international scholars, this Cambridge History is the latest in a sequence of volumes firmly established as the principal reference source for the history of political thought. In a series of scholarly but accessible essays, every major theme in nineteenth-century political thought is covered, including political economy, religion, democratic radicalism, nationalism, socialism and feminism. The volume also includes studies of major figures, including Hegel, Mill, Bentham and Marx, and biographical notes on every significant thinker in the period. Of interest to students and scholars of politics and history at all levels, this volume explores seismic changes in the languages and expectations of politics accompanying political revolution, industrialisation and imperial expansion and less-noted continuities in political and social thinking.
History

Ideas of Power in the Late Middle Ages, 1296–1417

Author: Joseph Canning

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1139504959

Category: History

Page: N.A

View: 3100

Through a focused and systematic examination of late medieval scholastic writers - theologians, philosophers and jurists - Joseph Canning explores how ideas about power and legitimate authority were developed over the 'long fourteenth century'. The author provides a new model for understanding late medieval political thought, taking full account of the intensive engagement with political reality characteristic of writers in this period. He argues that they used Aristotelian and Augustinian ideas to develop radically new approaches to power and authority, especially in response to political and religious crises. The book examines the disputes between King Philip IV of France and Pope Boniface VIII and draws upon the writings of Dante Alighieri, Marsilius of Padua, William of Ockham, Bartolus, Baldus and John Wyclif to demonstrate the variety of forms of discourse used in the period. It focuses on the most fundamental problem in the history of political thought - where does legitimate authority lie?
Political Science

States of War

Enlightenment Origins of the Political

Author: David William Bates

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN: 0231528663

Category: Political Science

Page: 272

View: 8063

We fear that the growing threat of violent attack has upset the balance between existential concepts of political power, which emphasize security, and traditional notions of constitutional limits meant to protect civil liberties. We worry that constitutional states cannot, during a time of war, terror, and extreme crisis, maintain legality and preserve civil rights and freedoms. David Williams Bates allays these concerns by revisiting the theoretical origins of the modern constitutional state, which, he argues, recognized and made room for tensions among law, war, and the social order. We traditionally associate the Enlightenment with the taming of absolutist sovereign power through the establishment of a legal state based on the rights of individuals. In his critical rereading, Bates shows instead that Enlightenment thinkers conceived of political autonomy in a systematic, theoretical way. Focusing on the nature of foundational violence, war, and existential crises, eighteenth-century thinkers understood law and constitutional order not as constraints on political power but as the logical implication of that primordial force. Returning to the origin stories that informed the beginnings of political community, Bates reclaims the idea of law, warfare, and the social order as intertwining elements subject to complex historical development. Following an analysis of seminal works by seventeenth-century natural-law theorists, Bates reviews the major canonical thinkers of constitutional theory (Locke, Montesquieu, and Rousseau) from the perspective of existential security and sovereign power. Countering Carl Schmitt's influential notion of the autonomy of the political, Bates demonstrates that Enlightenment thinkers understood the autonomous political sphere as a space of law protecting individuals according to their political status, not as mere members of a historically contingent social order.
History

Medieval Sovereignty

Marsilius of Padua and Bartolus of Saxoferrato

Author: Francesco Maiolo

Publisher: Eburon Uitgeverij B.V.

ISBN: 9059720814

Category: History

Page: 330

View: 4769

Medieval Sovereignty examines the idea of sovereignty in the Middle Ages and asks if it can be considered a fundamental element of medieval constitutional order. Francesco Maiolo analyzes the writings of Marsilius of Padua (1275/80–1342/43) and Bartolous of Saxoferrato (1314–57) and assesses their relative contributions as early proponents of popular sovereignty. Both are credited with having provided the legal justification for medieval popular government. Maiolo’s cogent reconsideration of this primacy is an important addition to current medieval studies.
History

The Mortgage of the Past

Reshaping the Ancient Political Inheritance (1050-1300)

Author: Francis Oakley

Publisher: Yale University Press

ISBN: 030018350X

Category: History

Page: 320

View: 3114

Francis Oakley continues his magisterial three-part history of the emergence of Western political thought during the Middle Ages with this second volume in the series. Here, Oakley explores kingship from the tenth century to the beginning of the fourteenth, showing how, under the stresses of religious and cultural development, kingship became an inceasingly secular institution. “A masterpiece and the central part of a trilogy that will be a true masterwork.”—Jeffrey Burton Russell, University of California, Santa Barbara
History

Edinburgh Companion to the History of Democracy

Author: Benjamin Isakhan

Publisher: Edinburgh University Press

ISBN: 0748653686

Category: History

Page: 384

View: 6283

Re-examines the long and complex history of democracy and broadens the traditional view of this history by complementing it with examples from unexplored or under-examined quarters.
Political Science

Routledge Handbook of Regionalism & Federalism

Author: John Loughlin,John Kincaid,Wilfried Swenden

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1136727698

Category: Political Science

Page: 640

View: 9067

Almost all states are either federal or regionalized in some sense. It is difficult to find a state that is entirely unitary and the Routledge Handbook of Regionalism and Federalism necessarily takes in almost the entire world. Both federalism and regionalism have been subjects of a vast academic literature mainly from political science but sometimes also from history, economics, and geography. This cutting edge examination seeks to evaluate the two types of state organization from the perspective of political science producing a work that is analytical rather than simply descriptive. The Handbook presents some of the latest theoretical reflections on regionalism and federalism and then moves on to discuss cases of both regionalism and federalism in key countries chosen from the world’s macro-regions. Assembling this wide range of case studies allows the book to present a general picture of current trends in territorial governance. The final chapters then examine failed federations such as Czechoslovakia and examples of transnational regionalism - the EU, NAFTA and the African Union. Covering evolving forms of federalism and regionalism in all parts of the world and featuring a comprehensive range of case studies by leading international scholars this work will be an essential reference source for all students and scholars of international politics, comparative politics and international relations.
Law

Legalism

Community and Justice

Author: Fernanda Pirie,Judith Scheele

Publisher: OUP Oxford

ISBN: 0191025933

Category: Law

Page: 260

View: 8418

'Community' and 'justice' recur in anthropological, historical, and legal scholarship, yet as concepts they are notoriously slippery. Historians and lawyers look to anthropologists as 'community specialists', but anthropologists often avoid the concept through circumlocution: although much used (and abused) by historians, legal thinkers, and political philosophers, the term remains strikingly indeterminate and often morally overdetermined. 'Justice', meanwhile, is elusive, alternately invoked as the goal of contemporary political theorizing, and wrapped in obscure philosophical controversy. A conceptual knot emerges in much legal and political thought between law, justice, and community, but theories abound, without any agreement over concepts. The contributors to this volume use empirical case studies to unpick threads of this knot. Local codes from Anglo-Saxon England, north Africa, and medieval Armenia indicate disjunctions between community boundaries and the subjects of local rules and categories; processes of justice from early modern Europe to eastern Tibet suggest new ways of conceptualizing the relationship between law and justice; and practices of exile that recur throughout the world illustrate contingent formulations of community. In the first book in the series, Legalism: Anthropology and History, law was addressed through a focus on local legal categories as conceptual tools. Here this approach is extended to the ideas and ideals of justice and community. Rigorous cross-cultural comparison allows the contributors to avoid normative assumptions, while opening new avenues of inquiry for lawyers, anthropologists, and historians alike.