Social Science

The Future of the Past

Author: Tamara Bray

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 272

View: 136

To date, the notion of repatriation has been formulated as a highly polarized debate with museums, archaeologists, and anthropologists on one side, and Native Americans on the other. This volume offers both a retrospective and a prospective look at the topic of repatriation. By juxtaposing the divergent views of native peoples, anthropologists, museum professionals, and members of the legal profession, it illustrates the complexity of the repatriation issue.
Art

The Long Way Home

Author: Paul Turnbull

Publisher: Berghahn Books

ISBN:

Category: Art

Page: 207

View: 450

Paul Turnbull is a Professor of history in the School of History, Philosophy, Religion and Classics at the University of Queensland. He has written extensively on nineteenth-century racial thought, and the theft and repatriation of Indigenous bodily remains. His recent publications include (with Cressida Fforde and Jane Hubert) the co-edited volume The Dead and their Possessions (Routledge). --
Social Science

Social Bioarchaeology

Author: Sabrina C. Agarwal

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 496

View: 225

Illustrates new methodological directions in analyzing human social and biological variation Offers a wide array of research on past populations around the globe Explains the central features of bioarchaeological research by key researchers and established experts around the world
History

Indigenous Peoples and Archaeology in Latin America

Author: Cristóbal Gnecco

Publisher: Left Coast Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 365

View: 688

Eighteen chapters primarily by Latin American scholars describe the range of relations between indigenous peoples and archaeology in the first major attempt to describe indigenous archaeology in Latin America for an English speaking audience.
History

In the Smaller Scope of Conscience

Author: C. Timothy McKeown

Publisher: University of Arizona Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 288

View: 912

In 1989, The National Museum of the American Indian Act (NMAIA) was successfully passed after a long and intense struggle. One year later, the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA) followed. These federal repatriation statutes—arguably some of the most important laws in the history of anthropology, museology, and American Indian rights—enabled Native Americans to reclaim human remains, funerary objects, sacred objects, and objects of cultural patrimony. Twenty years later, the controversy instigated by the creation of NMAIA and NAGPRA continues to simmer. In the Smaller Scope of Conscience is a thoughtful and detailed study of the ins and outs of the four-year process behind these laws. It is a singular contribution to the history of these issues, with the potential to help mediate the ongoing debate by encouraging all sides to retrace the steps of the legislators responsible for the acts. Few works are as detailed as McKeown’s account, which looks into bills that came prior to NMAIA and NAGPRA and combs the legislative history for relevant reports and correspondence. Testimonies, documents, and interviews from the primary players of this legislative process are cited to offer insights into the drafting and political processes that shaped NMAIA and NAGPRA. Above all else, this landmark work distinguishes itself from earlier legislative histories with the quality of its analysis. Invested and yet evenhanded in his narrative, McKeown ensures that this journey through history—through the strategies and struggles of different actors to effect change through federal legislation—is not only accurate but eminently intriguing.
Social Science

The Force of Family

Author: Cara Krmpotich

Publisher: University of Toronto Press

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 240

View: 197

Over the course of more than a decade, the Haida Nation triumphantly returned home all known Haida ancestral remains from North American museums. In the summer of 2010, they achieved what many thought was impossible: the repatriation of ancestral remains from the Pitt Rivers Museum at the University of Oxford. The Force of Family is an ethnography of those efforts to repatriate ancestral remains from museums around the world. Focusing on objects made to honour the ancestors, Cara Krmpotich explores how memory, objects, and kinship connect and form a cultural archive. Since the mid-1990s, Haidas have been making button blankets and bentwood boxes with clan crest designs, hosting feasts for hundreds of people, and composing and choreographing new songs and dances in the service of repatriation. The book comes to understand how shared experiences of sewing, weaving, dancing, cooking and feasting lead to the Haida notion of “respect,” the creation of kinship and collective memory, and the production of a cultural archive.
History

Ancient Burial Practices in the American Southwest

Author: Douglas R. Mitchell

Publisher: UNM Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 264

View: 462

Prehistoric burial practices provide an unparalleled opportunity for understanding and reconstructing ancient civilizations and for identifying the influences that helped shape them.