BIOGRAPHY & AUTOBIOGRAPHY

The General Vs. the President

MacArthur and Truman at the Brink of Nuclear War

Author: H. W. Brands

Publisher: Anchor Books

ISBN: 1101912170

Category: BIOGRAPHY & AUTOBIOGRAPHY

Page: 480

View: 417

At the height of the Korean War, President Harry S. Truman committed a gaffe that sent shock waves around the world. When asked by a reporter about the possible use of atomic weapons in response to China's entry into the war, Truman replied testily, "The military commander in the field will have charge of the use of the weapons, as he always has." This suggested that General Douglas MacArthur, the willful, fearless, and highly decorated commander of the American and U.N. forces, had his finger on the nuclear trigger. A correction quickly followed, but the damage was done; two visions for America's path forward were clearly in opposition, and one man would have to make way. Truman was one of the most unpopular presidents in American history. Heir to a struggling economy, a ruined Europe, and increasing tension with the Soviet Union, on no issue was the path ahead clear and easy. General MacArthur, by contrast, was incredibly popular, as untouchable as any officer has ever been in America. The lessons he drew from World War II were absolute- appeasement leads to disaster and a showdown with the communists was inevitable--the sooner the better. In the nuclear era, when the Soviets, too, had the bomb, the specter of a catastrophic third World War lurked menacingly close on the horizon. The contest of wills between these two titanic characters unfolds against the turbulent backdrop of a faraway war and terrors conjured at home by Joseph McCarthy. From the drama of Stalin's blockade of West Berlin to the daring landing of MacArthur's forces at Inchon to the shocking entrance of China into the war,The General and the Presidentvividly evokes the making of a new American era. From the Hardcover edition.
History

Heirs of the Founders

The Epic Rivalry of Henry Clay, John Calhoun and Daniel Webster, the Second Generation of American Giants

Author: H. W. Brands

Publisher: Doubleday

ISBN: 0385542542

Category: History

Page: 432

View: 9148

From New York Times bestselling historian H. W. Brands comes the riveting story of how America's second generation of political giants--Henry Clay, Daniel Webster, and John Calhoun--battled to complete the unfinished work of the Founding Fathers and decide the shape of our democracy. In the early days of the nineteenth century, three young men strode onto the national stage, elected to Congress at a moment when the Founding Fathers were beginning to retire to their farms. Daniel Webster of Massachusetts, a champion orator known for his eloquence, spoke for the North and its business class. Henry Clay of Kentucky, as dashing as he was ambitious, embodied the hopes of the rising West. South Carolina's John Calhoun, with piercing eyes and an even more piercing intellect, defended the South and slavery. Together this second generation of American founders took the country to war, battled one another for the presidency, and tasked themselves with finishing the work the Founders had left undone. Above all, they sought to remedy the two glaring flaws in the Constitution: its fudge on where authority ultimately rested, with the states or the nation; and its unwillingness to address the essential incompatibility of republicanism and slavery. They wrestled with these issues for four decades, arguing bitterly and hammering out political compromises that held the union together, but only just. Then, in 1850, when California moved to join the union as a free state, "the three great men of America" had one last chance to save the country from the real risk of civil war. But by then they were never further apart. Thrillingly and authoritatively, H. W. Brands narrates the little-known drama of the dangerous early years of our democracy.
History

Reminiscences

Author: General Douglas Macarthur

Publisher: Naval Institute Press

ISBN: 1612511732

Category: History

Page: 496

View: 3453

Written in his own hand, and finished only weeks before his death, Reminiscences by General Douglas MacArthur spans more than half a century of modern history. These pages show a man whose unique vantage point at the center of the stage enabled him to illuminate major controversies of our time, and whose views and ideas - never before published in full - are now bound to bring new and unexpected reappraisals to the conflicts in which he himself was the central figure. Douglas MacArthur served under eight presidents. He was honored as few men have been. His genius for command, and his ability to implement that command by strategy, stand as landmarks in military history. No man was ever so outspoken in his commitment to his troops or in his beliefs. A legend in his own lifetime, he was a man who aroused controversy, yet stood above the awe and the conflicts he inspired. Never before has one soldier's life so completely reflected a nation's military history. After graduation from West Point with the highest average ever achieved by a cadet, MacArthur served in Vera Cruz during the Mexican uprisings and then as military attache in the Far East, where he first perceived Japanese aspirations for hegemony the Orient. His courage in the trenches and his leadership of the famous Rainbow Division during the First World War were cited by General Pershing, who seven times awarded MacArthur the Silver Star.
History

MacArthur's War

Korea and the Undoing of an American Hero

Author: Stanley Weintraub

Publisher: Free Press

ISBN: 9781439152942

Category: History

Page: 416

View: 5135

Douglas MacArthur towers over twentieth-century American history. His fame is based chiefly on his World War II service in the Philippines. Yet Korea, America's forgotten war, was far more "MacArthur's War" -- and it remains one of our most brutal and frightening. In just three years thirty-five thousand Americans lost their lives -- more than three times the rate of losses in Vietnam. Korea, like Vietnam, was a breeding ground for the crimes of war. To this day, six thousand Americans remain MIA. It was Korea where American troops faced a Communist foe for the first time, as both China and the Soviet Union contributed troops to the North Korean cause. The war that nearly triggered the use of nuclear weapons reveals MacArthur at his most flamboyant, flawed, yet still, at times, brilliant. Acclaimed historian Stanley Weintraub offers a thrilling blow-by-blow account of the key actions of the Korean War during the months of MacArthur's command. Our lack of preparedness for the invasion, our disastrous retreat to a corner of Korea, the daring landing at Inchon, the miscalculations in pursuing the enemy north, the headlong retreats from the Yalu River and Chosin Reservoir, and the clawing back to the 38th parallel, all can be blamed or credited to MacArthur. He was imperious, vain, blind to criticism, and so insubordinate that Truman was forced to fire him. Yet years later, the war would end where MacArthur had left it, at the border that still stands as one of history's last frontiers between communism and freedom. MacArthur's War draws on extensive archival research, memoirs, and the latest findings from archives in the formerly communist world, to weave a rich tale in the voices of its participants. From MacArthur and his upper cadre, to feisty combat correspondent Maggie Higgins and her fellow journalists, to the grunts who bore the brunt of MacArthur's decisions, for good and ill, this is a harrowing account of modern warfare at its bloodiest. MacArthur's War is the gripping story of the Korean War and its soldiers -- and of the one soldier who dominated the rest.
Biography & Autobiography

Traitor to His Class

The Privileged Life and Radical Presidency of Franklin Delano Roosevelt

Author: H. W. Brands

Publisher: Anchor

ISBN: 9780385528382

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 896

View: 2369

NATIONAL BESTSELLER A brilliant evocation of the qualities that made FDR one of the most beloved and greatest of American presidents. Drawing on archival material, public speeches, correspondence and accounts by those closest to Roosevelt early in his career and during his presidency, H. W. Brands shows how Roosevelt transformed American government during the Depression with his New Deal legislation, and carefully managed the country's prelude to war. Brands shows how Roosevelt's friendship and regard for Winston Churchill helped to forge one of the greatest alliances in history, as Roosevelt, Churchill, and Stalin maneuvered to defeat Germany and prepare for post-war Europe. From the Trade Paperback edition.
Biography & Autobiography

Harry S. Truman

The American Presidents Series: The 33rd President, 1945-1953

Author: Robert Dallek

Publisher: Macmillan

ISBN: 9780805069389

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 183

View: 5357

Traces the thirty-third president's unlikely rise to power and his role in bringing America into the nuclear age, in a portrait that covers such topics as his perspectives on civil rights and labor, his clashes with Douglas MacArthur over the conduct of the Korean War, and his dramatic reelection in 1948. 35,000 first printing.
History

Inside the Cold War

Loy Henderson and the Rise of the American Empire 1918-1961

Author: H. W. Brands

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9780735102989

Category: History

Page: 352

View: 8491

A biography of the American diplomat examines his influence on American foreign policy
Biography & Autobiography

Truman

Author: David McCullough

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 0743260295

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 1120

View: 9369

The Pulitzer Prize–winning biography of Harry S. Truman, whose presidency included momentous events from the atomic bombing of Japan to the outbreak of the Cold War and the Korean War, told by America’s beloved and distinguished historian. The life of Harry S. Truman is one of the greatest of American stories, filled with vivid characters—Roosevelt, Churchill, Stalin, Eleanor Roosevelt, Bess Wallace Truman, George Marshall, Joe McCarthy, and Dean Acheson—and dramatic events. In this riveting biography, acclaimed historian David McCullough not only captures the man—a more complex, informed, and determined man than ever before imagined—but also the turbulent times in which he rose, boldly, to meet unprecedented challenges. The last president to serve as a living link between the nineteenth and the twentieth centuries, Truman’s story spans the raw world of the Missouri frontier, World War I, the powerful Pendergast machine of Kansas City, the legendary Whistle-Stop Campaign of 1948, and the decisions to drop the atomic bomb, confront Stalin at Potsdam, send troops to Korea, and fire General MacArthur. Drawing on newly discovered archival material and extensive interviews with Truman’s own family, friends, and Washington colleagues, McCullough tells the deeply moving story of the seemingly ordinary “man from Missouri” who was perhaps the most courageous president in our history.
History

Sons of Freedom

The Forgotten American Soldiers Who Defeated Germany in World War I

Author: Geoffrey Wawro

Publisher: Basic Books

ISBN: 0465093922

Category: History

Page: 640

View: 4027

The definitive history of America's decisive role in World War I The American contribution to World War I is one of the great stories of the twentieth century, and yet it has all but vanished from view. Historians have dismissed the American war effort as largely economic and symbolic. But as Geoffrey Wawro shows in Sons of Freedom, the French and British were on the verge of collapse in 1918, and would have lost the war without the Doughboys. Field Marshal Douglas Haig, commander of the British Expeditionary Force, described the Allied victory as a "miracle"--but it was a distinctly American miracle. In Sons of Freedom, prize-winning historian Geoffrey Wawro weaves together in thrilling detail the battles, strategic deliberations, and dreadful human cost of the American war effort. A major revision of the history of World War I, Sons of Freedom resurrects the brave heroes who saved the Allies, defeated Germany, and established the United States as the greatest of the great powers.
Political Science

The Big Stick

The Limits of Soft Power and the Necessity of Military Force

Author: Eliot A. Cohen

Publisher: Basic Books

ISBN: 0465096573

Category: Political Science

Page: 304

View: 2755

"Speak softly and carry a big stick" Theodore Roosevelt famously said in 1901, when the United States was emerging as a great power. It was the right sentiment, perhaps, in an age of imperial rivalry but today many Americans doubt the utility of their global military presence, thinking it outdated, unnecessary or even dangerous. In The Big Stick, Eliot A. Cohen-a scholar and practitioner of international relations-disagrees. He argues that hard power remains essential for American foreign policy. While acknowledging that the US must be careful about why, when, and how it uses force, he insists that its international role is as critical as ever, and armed force is vital to that role. Cohen explains that American leaders must learn to use hard power in new ways and for new circumstances. The rise of a well-armed China, Russia's conquest of Crimea and eastern Ukraine, nuclear threats from North Korea and Iran, and the spread of radical Islamist movements like ISIS are some of the key threats to global peace. If the United States relinquishes its position as a strong but prudent military power, and fails to accept its role as the guardian of a stable world order we run the risk of unleashing disorder, violence and tyranny on a scale not seen since the 1930s. The US is still, as Madeleine Albright once dubbed it, "the indispensable nation."
Biography & Autobiography

Plain Speaking

An Oral Biography of Harry S. Truman

Author: Merle Miller

Publisher: Black Dog & Leventhal Pub

ISBN: 9781579124373

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 448

View: 2284

Biography & Autobiography

The Heartbreak of Aaron Burr

Author: H.W. Brands

Publisher: Anchor

ISBN: 0307743284

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 224

View: 2600

Though he was a hero of the Revolutionary War, a prominent New York politician, and vice president of the United States, Aaron Burr is today best remembered as the villain who killed Alexander Hamilton in a duel. But as H. W. Brands demonstrates in this fascinating portrait of one of the most compelling politicians in American history, Burr was also a man before his time—a proponent of equality between the sexes well over a century before women were able to vote in the US. Through Burr's extensive, witty correspondence with his daughter Theodosia, Brands traces the arc of a scandalous political career and the early years of American politics. The Heartbreak of Aaron Burr not only dramatizes through their words his eventful life, it also tells a touching story of a father's love for his exceptional daughter, which endured through public shame, bankruptcy, and exile, and outlasted even Theodosia's tragic disappearance at sea. A Paperback Original From the Trade Paperback edition.
Generals

Douglas MacArthur

American Warrior

Author: Arthur Herman

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 0812994884

Category: Generals

Page: 937

View: 8121

"The Pulitzer Prize finalist and author of Gandhi & Churchill goes beyond the mythologies of the World War II general to illuminate his strengths and weaknesses, placing his career against a backdrop of history while discussing how he shaped his character to meet national needs, "--NoveList.
Biography & Autobiography

Where the Buck Stops

The Personal and Private Writings of Harry S. Truman

Author: Margaret Truman

Publisher: Grand Central Publishing

ISBN: 9780446391757

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 388

View: 4781

In the bestselling tradition of Margaret Truman's biography Harry S. Truman, here are the 33rd U.S. President's fascinating theories and opinions on leadership and leaders, plus his picks for the best and worst presidents--all in his bluntly honest "give-em-hell" style.
Political Science

The Foundation of the CIA

Harry Truman, The Missouri Gang, and the Origins of the Cold War

Author: Richard E. Schroeder

Publisher: University of Missouri Press

ISBN: 0826273939

Category: Political Science

Page: 185

View: 2220

This highly accessible book provides new material and a fresh perspective on American National Intelligence practice, focusing on the first fifty years of the twentieth century, when the United States took on the responsibilities of a global superpower during the first years of the Cold War. Late to the art of intelligence, the United States during World War II created a new model of combining intelligence collection and analytic functions into a single organization—the OSS. At the end of the war, President Harry Truman and a small group of advisors developed a new, centralized agency directly subordinate to and responsible to the President, despite entrenched institutional resistance. Instrumental to the creation of the CIA was a group known colloquially as the “Missouri Gang,” which included not only President Truman but equally determined fellow Missourians Clark Clifford, Sidney Souers, and Roscoe Hillenkoetter.
Biography & Autobiography

The Age of Eisenhower

America and the World in the 1950s

Author: William I Hitchcock

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 1451698437

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 672

View: 2660

NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER “A page-turner masterpiece.” —Jim Lehrer In a 2017 survey, presidential historians ranked Dwight D. Eisenhower fifth on the list of great presidents, behind the perennial top four: Lincoln, Washington, Franklin D. Roosevelt, and Teddy Roosevelt. Historian William Hitchcock shows that this high ranking is justified. Eisenhower’s accomplishments were enormous, and loom ever larger from the vantage point of our own tumultuous times. A former general, Ike kept the peace: he ended the Korean War, avoided a war in Vietnam, adroitly managed a potential confrontation with China, and soothed relations with the Soviet Union after Stalin’s death. He guided the Republican Party to embrace central aspects of the New Deal like Social Security. He thwarted the demagoguery of McCarthy and he advanced the agenda of civil rights for African Americans. As part of his strategy to wage, and win, the Cold War, Eisenhower expanded American military power, built a fearsome nuclear arsenal and launched the space race. In his famous Farewell Address, he acknowledged that Americans needed such weapons in order to keep global peace—but he also admonished his citizens to remain alert to the potentially harmful influence of the “military-industrial complex.” From 1953 to 1961, no one dominated the world stage as did President Dwight D. Eisenhower. The Age of Eisenhower is the definitive account of this presidency, drawing extensively on declassified material from the Eisenhower Library, the CIA and Defense Department, and troves of unpublished documents. In his masterful account, Hitchcock shows how Ike shaped modern America, and he astutely assesses Eisenhower’s close confidants, from Attorney General Brownell to Secretary of State Dulles. The result is an eye-opening reevaluation that explains why this “do-nothing” president is rightly regarded as one of the best leaders our country has ever had.
History

The Most Dangerous Man in America

The Making of Douglas MacArthur

Author: Mark Perry

Publisher: Basic Books

ISBN: 0465080677

Category: History

Page: 416

View: 8116

At times, even his admirers seemed unsure of what to do with General Douglas MacArthur. Imperious, headstrong, and vain, MacArthur matched an undeniable military genius with a massive ego and a rebellious streak that often seemed to destine him for the dustbin of history. Yet despite his flaws, MacArthur is remembered as a brilliant commander whose combined-arms operation in the Pacific—the first in the history of warfare—secured America’s triumph in World War II and changed the course of history. In The Most Dangerous Man in America, celebrated historian Mark Perry examines how this paradox of a man overcame personal and professional challenges to lead his countrymen in their darkest hour. As Perry shows, Franklin Roosevelt and a handful of MacArthur’s subordinates made this feat possible, taming MacArthur, making him useful, and finally making him victorious. A gripping, authoritative biography of the Pacific Theater’s most celebrated and misunderstood commander, The Most Dangerous Man in America reveals the secrets of Douglas MacArthur’s success—and the incredible efforts of the men who made it possible.
Biography & Autobiography

The Man Who Saved the Union

Ulysses Grant in War and Peace

Author: H. W. Brands

Publisher: Anchor

ISBN: 0307475158

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 718

View: 4234

An analysis of Ulysses Grant's pivotal contributions during the Civil War and his presidency covers his defense of black civil rights, his willingness to sacrifice troops to win the war, and the criticism over his Reconstruction policies.
History

Unclear Physics

Why Iraq and Libya Failed to Build Nuclear Weapons

Author: Malfrid Braut-Hegghammer

Publisher: Cornell University Press

ISBN: 1501706454

Category: History

Page: 288

View: 8830

Many authoritarian leaders want nuclear weapons, but few manage to acquire them. Autocrats seeking nuclear weapons fail in different ways and to varying degrees—Iraq almost managed it; Libya did not come close. In Unclear Physics, Malfrid Braut-Hegghammer compares the two failed nuclear weapons programs, showing that state capacity played a crucial role in the trajectory and outcomes of both projects. Braut-Hegghammer draws on a rich set of new primary sources, collected during years of research in archives, fieldwork across the Middle East, and interviews with scientists and decision makers from both states. She gained access to documents and individuals that no other researcher has been able to consult. Her book tells the story of the Iraqi and Libyan programs from their origins in the late 1950s and 1960s until their dismantling. This book reveals contemporary perspectives from scientists and regime officials on the opportunities and challenges facing each project. Many of the findings challenge the conventional wisdom about clandestine weapons programs in closed authoritarian states and their prospects of success or failure. Braut-Hegghammer suggests that scholars and analysts ought to pay closer attention to how state capacity affects nuclear weapons programs in other authoritarian regimes, both in terms of questioning the actual control these leaders have over their nuclear weapons programs and the capability of their scientists to solve complex technical challenges.
HISTORY

The Imagineers of War

The Untold History of DARPA, the Pentagon Agency that Changed the World

Author: Sharon Weinberger

Publisher: Knopf

ISBN: 0385351798

Category: HISTORY

Page: 475

View: 4239

Founded in 1958 in response to the launch of Sputnik, DARPA has been responsible for countless inventions and technologies that have evolved from the agency's mission- forward-thinking solutions to the Pentagon's challenges. Sharon Weinberger gives us a riveting account of DARPA's successes and failures, useful innovations and wild-eyed schemes- we see how the nuclear threat sparked investment in computer networking, which led to the Internet, as well as plans to power a missile-seeking particle beam by draining the Great Lakes...how, in Vietnam, DARPA developed technology for the world's first armed drones and was also responsible for Agent Orange... how DARPA's recent success with self-driving cars is counterbalanced with its disappointing contributions to the Afghanistan and Iraq wars. Weinberger has spoken to dozens of former DARPA and Pentagon officials--many of whom had never been interviewed before about their work with the agency--and synthesized countless documents obtained under the Freedom of Information Act. The result is a riveting history of a meeting point of science, technology, and politics.