Literary Criticism

The Great Dissent

John Henry Newman and the Liberal Heresy

Author: Robert Pattison

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780195361926

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 256

View: 1302

"Alas," Newman said of liberalism, "it is an error overspreading, as a snare, the whole earth." The Great Dissent examines how from his implacable opposition to liberalism Newman developed a sweeping critique of modern values only rivaled in breadth and scorn by that of Nietzsche. The Great Dissent offers a revaluation of Newman's whole thought and establishes his place in the history of ideas as the leading English dissident from the liberalism of contemporary civilization and the foremost modern spokesman for the reality of dogmatic truth.
History

The Great Dissent

How Oliver Wendell Holmes Changed His Mind--and Changed the History of Free Speech in America

Author: Thomas Healy

Publisher: Metropolitan Books

ISBN: 1429949090

Category: History

Page: 336

View: 5058

A gripping intellectual history reveals how Oliver Wendell Holmes became a free-speech advocate and established the modern understanding of the First Amendment No right seems more fundamental to American public life than freedom of speech. Yet well into the twentieth century, that freedom was still an unfulfilled promise, with Americans regularly imprisoned merely for speaking out against government policies. Indeed, free speech as we know it comes less from the First Constitutional Amendment than from a most unexpected source: Supreme Court justice Oliver Wendell Holmes. A lifelong skeptic, he disdained all individual rights, including the right to express one's political views. But in 1919, it was Holmes who wrote a dissenting opinion that would become the canonical affirmation of free speech in the United States. Why did Holmes change his mind? That question has puzzled historians for almost a century. Now, with the aid of newly discovered letters and confidential memos, law professor Thomas Healy reconstructs in vivid detail Holmes's journey from free-speech opponent to First Amendment hero. It is the story of a remarkable behind-the-scenes campaign by a group of progressives to bring a legal icon around to their way of thinking—and a deeply touching human narrative of an old man saved from loneliness and despair by a few unlikely young friends. Beautifully written and exhaustively researched, The Great Dissent is intellectual history at its best, revealing how free debate can alter the life of a man and the legal landscape of an entire nation. A Kirkus Reviews Best Nonfiction Book of 2013
Common law

Common law

Author: Oliver Wendell Holmes

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9783428121519

Category: Common law

Page: 423

View: 5365

Law

Loose Sallies Essays

Author: Daniel J. Kornstein

Publisher: AuthorHouse

ISBN: 1491844795

Category: Law

Page: 276

View: 8493

Loose Sallies is a new collection of essays from an experienced writer who also happens to be a full time practicing lawyer. In this stimulating and provocative volume, Daniel J. Kornstein turns his searching eye and fluent pen to a number of topics of interest to all of us. The first group of essays contains Kornstein's original thoughts on the drafting of the U.S. Constitution, a subject that affects us every day. Next he explores the most treasured part of our Constitution: our precious civil liberties. From there the author describes some interesting personalities and their lives. The final section is a miscellany of essays on subjects as varied as: the similarities between politics and litigation, whether private schools should be abolished, Bill Clinton and the draft, anti semitism in New York and London, and Steve Jobs and Ayn Rand. All in all, Loose Sallies is a virtuoso performance, a tour de force, by one of our finest essayists.
Biography & Autobiography

Meine geliebte Welt

Author: Sonia Sotomayor

Publisher: C.H.Beck

ISBN: 3406659489

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 349

View: 6194

Aufgewachsen in der Bronx, Puertoricanerin, die Kindheit prekär, der Vater Alkoholiker, die Mutter überfordert – Sonia Sotomayor war es nicht gerade in die Wiege gelegt, eines Tages Richterin am höchsten Gericht der Vereinigten Staaten von Amerika zu werden. Mit einem großen Herzen und viel Humor erzählt diese Ausnahmefrau von ihrem Weg, aber nicht um sich dabei auf die Schulter zu klopfen, sondern um anderen Menschen mit ihrer eigenen Geschichte Mut zu machen. Ein hinreißendes, ansteckendes Buch über das Trotzdem und über die – wirklich wichtigen – Dinge des Lebens. „’Nach der Lektüre werden mich die Leser nach menschlichen Kriterien beurteilen’, schreibt Sonia Sotomayor. Wir, die wir in diesem Fall die Jury sind, finden sie einfach unwiderstehlich.“ Washingtonian „Überwältigende und stark geschriebene Memoiren zum Thema Identität und Persönlichkeitsfindung ... Offenherzig, scharf beobachtet und vor allem tief empfunden.“ The New York Times „Eine Frau, die weiß, wo sie herkommt und die die Kraft hat, uns dorthin mitzunehmen.“ The New York Times Book Review
History

Polarity, Patriotism, and Dissent in Great War Canada, 1914-1919

Author: Brock Millman

Publisher: University of Toronto Press

ISBN: 1442615389

Category: History

Page: 358

View: 721

Compared to the idea that Canada was a nation forged in victory on Vimy Ridge, the reality of dissent and repression at home strikes a sour note. Through censorship, conscription, and internment, the government of Canada worked more ruthlessly than either Great Britain or the United States to suppress opposition to the war effort during the First World War. Polarity, Patriotism, and Dissent in Great War Canada, 1914-1919 examines the basis for those repressive policies. Brock Millman, an expert on wartime dissent in both the United Kingdom and Canada, argues that Canadian policy was driven first and foremost by a fear that opposition to the war amongst French Canadians and immigrant communities would provoke social tensions - and possibly even a vigilante backlash from the war's most fervent supporters in British Canada. Highlighting the class and ethnic divisions which characterized public support for the war, Polarity, Patriotism, and Dissent in Great War Canada, 1914-1919 offers a broad and much-needed reexamination of Canadian government policy on the home front.
Business & Economics

When Government Helped

Learning from the Successes and Failures of the New Deal

Author: Sheila Collins,Gertrude Goldberg

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0199990697

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 339

View: 8738

This book offers new perspectives on comparisons of the intersection of economic and environmental crises of these two periods.
Law

Dissent and the Supreme Court

Its Role in the Court's History and the Nation's Constitutional Dialogue

Author: Melvin I. Urofsky

Publisher: Vintage

ISBN: 110187063X

Category: Law

Page: 544

View: 8443

From the admired judicial authority, author of Louis D. Brandeis (“Remarkable”—Anthony Lewis, The New York Review of Books; “Monumental”—Alan M. Dershowitz, The New York Times Book Review), Division and Discord, and Supreme Decisions—Melvin Urofsky’s major new book looks at the role of dissent in the Supreme Court and the meaning of the Constitution through the greatest and longest lasting public-policy debate in the country’s history, among members of the Supreme Court, between the Court and the other branches of government, and between the Court and the people of the United States. Urofsky writes of the necessity of constitutional dialogue as one of the ways in which we as a people reinvent and reinvigorate our democratic society. In Dissent and the Supreme Court, he explores the great dissents throughout the Court’s 225-year history. He discusses in detail the role the Supreme Court has played in helping to define what the Constitution means, how the Court’s majority opinions have not always been right, and how the dissenters, by positing alternative interpretations, have initiated a critical dialogue about what a particular decision should mean. This dialogue is sometimes resolved quickly; other times it may take decades before the Court adjusts its position. Louis Brandeis’s dissenting opinion about wiretapping became the position of the Court four decades after it was written. The Court took six decades to adopt the dissenting opinion of the first Justice John Harlan in Plessy v. Ferguson (1896)—that segregation on the basis of race violated the Constitution—in Brown v. Board of Education (1954). Urofsky shows that the practice of dissent grew slowly but steadily and that in the nineteenth century dissents became more frequent. In the (in)famous case of Dred Scott v. Sanford (1857), Chief Justice Roger Taney’s opinion upheld slavery, declaring that blacks could never be citizens. The justice received intense condemnations from several of his colleagues, but it took a civil war and three constitutional amendments before the dissenting view prevailed and Dred Scott was overturned. Urofsky looks as well at the many aspects of American constitutional life that were affected by the Earl Warren Court—free speech, race, judicial appointment, and rights of the accused—and shows how few of these decisions were unanimous, and how the dissents in the earlier cases molded the results of later decisions; how with Roe v. Wade—the Dred Scott of the modern era—dissent fashioned subsequent decisions, and how, in the Court, a dialogue that began with the dissents in Roe has shaped every decision since. Urofsky writes of the rise of conservatism and discusses how the resulting appointments of more conservative jurists to the bench put the last of the Warren liberals—William Brennan and Thurgood Marshall—in increasingly beleaguered positions, and in the minority. He discusses the present age of incivility, in which reasoned dialogue seems less and less possible. Yet within the Marble Palace, the members of the Supreme Court continue to hear arguments, vote, and draft majority opinions, while the minority continues to “respectfully dissent.” The Framers understood that if a constitution doesn’t grow and adapt, it atrophies and dies, and if it does, so does the democratic society it has supported. Dissent—on the Court and off, Urofsky argues—has been a crucial ingredient in keeping the Constitution alive and must continue to be so. (With black-and-white illustrations throughout.) From the Hardcover edition.
Literary Collections

The Great Camouflage

Writings of Dissent (1941–1945)

Author: Suzanne Césaire

Publisher: Wesleyan University Press

ISBN: 0819572756

Category: Literary Collections

Page: 67

View: 1423

A new and complete English translation
History

The Great War and America

Civil-military Relations During World War I

Author: Nancy Gentile Ford

Publisher: ABC-CLIO

ISBN: 0275981991

Category: History

Page: 191

View: 7321

The evolution of civil-military relations in America's first major overseas coalition war.
History

America in the Great War

The Rise of the War Welfare State

Author: Ronald Schaffer

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780195364286

Category: History

Page: 244

View: 9307

After such conflicts as World War II, Vietnam, and now the Persian Gulf, the First World War seems a distant, almost ancient event. It conjures up images of trenches, horse-drawn wagons, and old-fashioned wide-brimmed helmets--a conflict closer to the Civil War than to our own time. It hardly seems an American war at all, considering we fought for scarcely over a year in a primarily European struggle. But, as Ronald Schaffer recounts in this fascinating new book, the Great War wrought a dramatic revolution in America, wrenching a diverse, unregulated, nineteenth-century society into the modern age. Ranging from the Oval Office to corporate boardroom, from the farmyard to the battlefield, America in the Great War details a nation reshaped by the demands of total war. Schaffer shows how the Wilson Administration used persuasion, manipulation, direct control, and the cooperation of private industries and organizations to mobilize a freewheeling, individualist country. The result was a war-welfare state, imposing the federal government on almost every aspect of American life. He describes how it spread propaganda, enforced censorship, and stifled dissent. Political radicals, religious pacifists, German-Americans, even average people who voiced honest doubts about the war suffered arrest and imprisonment. The government extended its control over most of the nation's economic life through a series of new agencies--largely filled with managers from private business, who used their new positions to eliminate competition and secure other personal and corporate gains. Schaffer also details the efforts of scholars, scientists, workers, women, African- Americans, and of social, medical, and moral reformers, to use the war to advance their own agendas even as they contributed to the drive for victory. And not the least important is his account of how soldiers reacted to the reality of war--both at the front lines and at the rear--revealing what brought the doughboys to the battlefield, and how they went through not only horror and disillusionment but felt a fervent patriotism as well. Some of the upheavals Schaffer describes were fleeting--as seen in the thousands of women who had to leave their wartime jobs when the boys came home--but others meant permanent change and set precedents for such future programs as the New Deal. By showing how American life would never be the same again after the Armistice, America in the Great War lays a new foundation for understanding both the First World War and twentieth-century America.
Biography & Autobiography

Gregory the Great and His World

Author: Robert Austin Markus

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9780521586085

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 241

View: 6961

A very important study of Gregory the Great by a major scholar, author of The End of Ancient Christianity.
History

Dissent

The History of an American Idea

Author: Ralph Young

Publisher: NYU Press

ISBN: 1479814520

Category: History

Page: 640

View: 3254

Finalist, 2016 Ralph Waldo Emerson Award One of Bustle's Books For Your Civil Disobedience Reading List Dissent: The History of an American Idea examines the key role dissent has played in shaping the United States. It focuses on those who, from colonial days to the present, dissented against the ruling paradigm of their time: from the Puritan Anne Hutchinson and Native American chief Powhatan in the seventeenth century, to the Occupy and Tea Party movements in the twenty-first century. The emphasis is on the way Americans, celebrated figures and anonymous ordinary citizens, responded to what they saw as the injustices that prevented them from fully experiencing their vision of America. At its founding the United States committed itself to lofty ideals. When the promise of those ideals was not fully realized by all Americans, many protested and demanded that the United States live up to its promise. Women fought for equal rights; abolitionists sought to destroy slavery; workers organized unions; Indians resisted white encroachment on their land; radicals angrily demanded an end to the dominance of the moneyed interests; civil rights protestors marched to end segregation; antiwar activists took to the streets to protest the nation’s wars; and reactionaries, conservatives, and traditionalists in each decade struggled to turn back the clock to a simpler, more secure time. Some dissenters are celebrated heroes of American history, while others are ordinary people: frequently overlooked, but whose stories show that change is often accomplished through grassroots activism. The United States is a nation founded on the promise and power of dissent. In this stunningly comprehensive volume, Ralph Young shows us its history. Teaching Resources from Temple University: Sample Course Syllabus Teaching Resources from C-Span Classroom Teaching Resources from Temple University
Business & Economics

Crashed

Wie zehn Jahre Finanzkrise die Welt verändert haben

Author: Adam Tooze

Publisher: Siedler Verlag

ISBN: 3641192773

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 800

View: 8612

Zehn Jahre danach: Der Finanzcrash und seine dramatischen Folgen Als die US-Großbank Lehman Brothers im September 2008 zusammenbrach, war dies der Tiefpunkt der Banken- und Finanzkrise. Und obwohl der totale Kollaps der Weltwirtschaft damals verhindert wurde, ist die Finanzkrise noch lange nicht Geschichte, wie der britische Historiker Adam Tooze zeigt. Er schildert, wie es zu dieser Krise der Finanzmärkte kam und welche dramatischen Folgen sie bis heute hat. Denn nicht nur ist durch die Finanzkrise die Stabilität Europas ins Wanken geraten, sie hat auch das Vertrauen in die Kraft der globalen Wirtschaftsordnung erschüttert – und so zum Aufstieg der Populisten beigetragen.
Religion

The Great Ejectment of 1662

Its Antecedents, Aftermath, and Ecumenical Significance

Author: Alan P.F. Sell

Publisher: Wipf and Stock Publishers

ISBN: 1630875724

Category: Religion

Page: 308

View: 2412

By Bartholomew's Day, 24 August, 1662, all ministers and schoolmasters in England and Wales were required by the Act of Uniformity to have given their "unfeigned assent and consent" to the Book of Common Prayer of the Church of England. On theological grounds nearly two thousand ministers--approximately one fifth of the clergy of the Church of England--refused to comply and thereby forfeited their livings. This book has been written to commemorate the 350th Anniversary of the Great Ejectment. In Part One three early modern historians provide accounts of the antecedents and aftermath of the ejectment in England and Wales, while in Part Two the case is advanced that the negative responses of the ejected ministers to the legal requirements of the Act of Uniformity were rooted in positive doctrinal convictions that are of continuing ecumenical significance.
Language Arts & Disciplines

Literature and Dissent in Milton's England

Author: Sharon Achinstein

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9780521818049

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 302

View: 9603

Examines the literary tradition of dissent produced by those who suffered political defeat and religious exclusion in Restoration England.