The International Criminal Court and Africa

One Decade on

Author: Evelyn A. Ankumah

Publisher: Intersentia

ISBN: 9781780684178

Category:

Page: 676

View: 867

More than ten years ago the International Criminal Court (ICC) was established as a universal court meant to achieve criminal justice worldwide. That goal still stands, but so far the Court has dedicated most of its time and resources to African conflicts in which international crimes (may) have been committed. While the ICC can be said to contribute to criminal justice in Africa, it cannot be denied that the relationship between the Court and the continent has been troublesome. The ICC has been accused of targeting Africa, and many African states do not seem willing to cooperate with the Court. Debates on Africa and international criminal justice are increasingly politicized. The authors of this volume recognize the current problems and criticism. Yet they do not side with populist pessimists who, after just over a decade of ICC experiences, conclude that the Court and international criminal justice are doomed to fail. Rather, the contributors believe there is a future for international criminal justice, including the ICC. The contributors use their unique specific knowledge, expertise, and experiences as the basis for reflections on the current problems and possible paths for improvement, both when it comes to the ICC as such, and its specific relationship with Africa. [Subject: Criminal Law, African Law, International Law]
Law

Africa and the International Criminal Court

Author: Gerhard Werle,Lovell Fernandez,Moritz Vormbaum

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 9462650292

Category: Law

Page: 303

View: 6003

The book deals with the controversial relationship between African states, represented by the African Union, and the International Criminal Court. This relationship started promisingly but has been in crisis in recent years. The overarching aim of the book is to analyze and discuss the achievements and shortcomings of interventions in Africa by the International Criminal Court as well as to develop proposals for cooperation between international courts, domestic courts outside Africa and courts within Africa. For this purpose, the book compiles contributions by practitioners of the International Criminal Court and by role players of the judiciary of African countries as well as by academic experts.
Law

The International Criminal Court and Africa

Author: Charles Chernor Jalloh,Ilias Bantekas

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0192538551

Category: Law

Page: 416

View: 8035

Africa has been at the forefront of contemporary global efforts towards ensuring greater accountability for international crimes. But the continent's early embrace of international criminal justice seems to be taking a new turn with the recent resistance from some African states claiming that the emerging system of international criminal law represents a new form of imperialism masquerading as international rule of law. This book analyses the relationship and tensions between the International Criminal Court (ICC) and Africa. It traces the origins of the confrontation between African governments, both acting individually and within the framework of the African Union, and the permanent Hague-based ICC. Leading commentators offer valuable insights on the core legal and political issues that have confused the relationship between the two sides and expose the uneasy interaction between international law and international politics. They offer suggestions on how best to continue the fight against impunity, using national, ICC, and regional justice mechanisms, while taking into principled account the views and interests of African States.
History

Rough Justice

The International Criminal Court's Battle to Fix the World, One Prosecution at a Time

Author: David Bosco

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0199844135

Category: History

Page: 297

View: 3017

The story of the movement to establish the International Criminal Court, its tumultuous first decade, and the challenges it will continue to face in the future.
Law

The Law and Practice of the International Criminal Court

Author: Carsten Stahn

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN: 0198705166

Category: Law

Page: 1326

View: 1383

Some parts of this publication are open access, available under the terms of a CC BY-NC-ND 4.0 International licence. Chapters 2, 4, 10, 47 and 49 are offered as a free PDF download from OUP and selected open access locations. The International Criminal Court is a controversial and important body within international law; one that is significantly growing in importance, particularly as other international criminal tribunals close down. After a decade of Court practice, this book takes stock of the activities of the International Criminal Court, identifying the key issues in need of re-thinking or potential reform. It provides a systematic and in-depth thematic account of the law and practice of the Court, including its changes context, the challenges it faces, and its overall contribution to international criminal law. The book is written by over forty leading practitioners and scholars from both inside and outside the Court. They provide an unparalleled insight into the Court as an institution, its jurisprudence, the impact of its activities, and its future development. The work addresses the ways in which the practice of the International Criminal Court has emerged, and identifies ways in which this practice could be refined or improved in future cases. The book is organized along six key themes: (i) the context of International Criminal Court investigations and prosecutions; (ii) the relationship of the Court to domestic jurisdictions; (iii) prosecutorial policy and practice; (iv) the applicable law; (v) fairness and expeditiousness of proceedings; and (vi) its impact and lessons learned. It shows the ways in which the Court has offered fresh perspectives on the theorization and conception of crimes, charges and individual criminal responsibility. It examines the procedural framework of the Court, including the functioning of different stages of proceedings. The Court's decisions have significant repercussions: on domestic law, criminal theory, and the law of other international courts and tribunals. In this context, the book assesses the extent to which specific approaches and assumptions, both positive and negative, regarding the potential impact of the Court are in need of re-thinking. This book will be essential reading for practitioners, scholars, and students of international criminal law.
Political Science

The Palgrave Handbook of Peacebuilding in Africa

Author: Tony Karbo,Kudrat Virk

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 3319622021

Category: Political Science

Page: 498

View: 5728

This handbook offers a critical assessment of the African agenda for conflict prevention, peacemaking, peacekeeping, and peacebuilding; the challenges and opportunities facing Africa’s regional organisations in their efforts towards building sustainable peace on the continent; and the role of external actors, including the United Nations, Britain, France, and South Asian troop-contributing countries. In so doing, it revisits the late Ali Mazrui’s concept of Pax Africana, calling on Africans to take responsibility for peace and security on their own continent. The creation of the African Union, in 2002, was an important step towards realising this ambition, and has led to the development of a new continental architecture for more robust conflict management. But, as the volume’s authors show, the quest for Pax Africana faces challenges. Combining thematic analyses and case studies, this book will be of interest to both scholars and policymakers working on peace, security, and governance issues in Africa.
Law

International Criminal Law in Context

Author: Philipp Kastner

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1317198999

Category: Law

Page: 346

View: 4709

International Criminal Law in Context provides a critical and contextual introduction to the fundamentals of international criminal law. It goes beyond a doctrinal analysis focused on the practice of international tribunals to draw on a variety of perspectives, capturing the complex processes of internationalisation that criminal law has experienced over the past few decades. The book considers international criminal law in context and seeks to account for the political and cultural factors that have influenced – and that continue to influence – this still-emerging body of law. Considering the substance, procedures, objectives, justifications and impacts of international criminal law, it addresses such topics as: • the history of international criminal law; • the subjects of international criminal law; • transitional justice and international criminal justice; • genocide, crimes against humanity, war crimes and the crime of aggression; • sexual and gender-based crimes; • international and hybrid criminal tribunals; • sentencing under international criminal law; and • the role of victims in international criminal procedure. The book will appeal to those who want to study international criminal law in a critical and contextualised way. Presenting original research, it will also be of interest to scholars and practitioners already familiar with the main legal and policy issues relating to this body of law.
Law

The International Criminal Court and Global Social Control

International Criminal Justice in Late Modernity

Author: Nerida Chazal

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1317589661

Category: Law

Page: 162

View: 8061

The International Criminal Court was established in 2002 to prosecute war crimes, crimes against humanity, and genocide. At its genesis the ICC was expected to help prevent atrocities from arising or escalating by ending the impunity of leaders and administering punishment for the commission of international crimes. More than a decade later, the ICC’s ability to achieve these broad aims has been questioned, as the ICC has reached only two guilty verdicts. In addition, some of the world’s major powers, including the United States, Russia and China, are not members of the ICC. These issues underscore a gap between the ideals of prevention and deterrence and the reality of the ICC’s functioning. This book explores the gaps, schisms, and contradictions that are increasingly defining the International Criminal Court, moving beyond existing legal, international relations, and political accounts of the ICC to analyse the Court from a criminological standpoint. By exploring the way different actors engage with the ICC and viewing the Court through the framework of late modernity, the book considers how gaps between rhetoric and reality arise in the work of the ICC. Contrary to much existing research, the book examines how such gaps and tensions can be productive as they enable the Court to navigate a complex, international environment driven by geopolitics. The International Criminal Court and Global Social Control will be of interest to academics, researchers, and advanced practitioners in international law, international relations, criminology, and political science. It will also be of use in upper-level undergraduate and postgraduate courses related to international criminal justice and globalization.
Biography & Autobiography

All the Missing Souls

A Personal History of the War Crimes Tribunals

Author: David Scheffer

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 0691140154

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 533

View: 9857

Recounts the author's experiences of setting up the International Criminal Court, including problems with achieving international cooperation for tribunals, war crimes victims, and challenges from the U.S. due to fears of soldiers facing prosecution.
Law

Africa and the ICC

Author: Kamari Clarke,Abel S. Knottnerus,Eefje de Volder

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1107147654

Category: Law

Page: 420

View: 6532

By investigating how the International Criminal Court (ICC) is portrayed in Africa, this book highlights how perceptions of justice are multilayered.
Law

Justice in Conflict

The Effects of the International Criminal Court's Interventions on Ending Wars and Building Peace

Author: Mark Kersten

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0191082945

Category: Law

Page: 280

View: 2236

What happens when the international community simultaneously pursues peace and justice in response to ongoing conflicts? What are the effects of interventions by the International Criminal Court (ICC) on the wars in which the institution intervenes? Is holding perpetrators of mass atrocities accountable a help or hindrance to conflict resolution? This book offers an in-depth examination of the effects of interventions by the ICC on peace, justice and conflict processes. The 'peace versus justice' debate, wherein it is argued that the ICC has either positive or negative effects on 'peace', has spawned in response to the Court's propensity to intervene in conflicts as they still rage. This book is a response to, and a critical engagement with, this debate. Building on theoretical and analytical insights from the fields of conflict and peace studies, conflict resolution, and negotiation theory, the book develops a novel analytical framework to study the Court's effects on peace, justice, and conflict processes. This framework is applied to two cases: Libya and northern Uganda. Drawing on extensive fieldwork, the core of the book examines the empirical effects of the ICC on each case. The book also examines why the ICC has the effects that it does, delineating the relationship between the interests of states that refer situations to the Court and the ICC's institutional interests, arguing that the negotiation of these interests determines which side of a conflict the ICC targets and thus its effects on peace, justice, and conflict processes. While the effects of the ICC's interventions are ultimately and inevitably mixed, the book makes a unique contribution to the empirical record on ICC interventions and presents a novel and sophisticated means of studying, analyzing, and understanding the effects of the Court's interventions in Libya, northern Uganda - and beyond.
Law

The International Criminal Court

A Commentary on the Rome Statute

Author: William A. Schabas

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0191060305

Category: Law

Page: 1400

View: 6438

Established as one of the main sources for the study of the Rome Statute of the International Criminal Court, this volume provides an article-by-article analysis of the Statute; the detailed analysis draws upon relevant case law from the Court itself, as well as from other international and national criminal tribunals, academic commentary, and related instruments such as the Elements of Crimes, the Rules of Procedure and Evidence, and the Relationship Agreement with the United Nations. Each of the 128 articles is accompanied by an overview of the drafting history as well as a bibliography of academic literature relevant to the provision. Written by a single author, the Commentary avoids duplication and inconsistency, providing a comprehensive presentation to assist those who must understand, interpret, and apply the complex provisions of the Rome Statute.This volume has been well-received in the academic community and has become a trusted reference for those who work at the Court, even judges. The fully updated second edition of The International Criminal Court incorporates new developments in the law, including discussions of recent judicial activity and the amendments to the Rome Statute adopted at the Kampala conference.
Law

Seeking Accountability for the Unlawful Use of Force

Author: Leila Nadya Sadat

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1316953475

Category: Law

Page: N.A

View: 4692

Despite the conclusion of the International Military Tribunal at Nuremberg that aggression is the 'supreme international crime', armed conflict remains a frequent and ubiquitous feature of international life, leaving millions of victims in its wake. This collection of original chapters by leading and emerging scholars from all around the world evaluates historic and current examples of the use of force and the context of crimes of aggression. As we approach the 75th anniversary of the Nuremberg War Crimes Tribunal, Seeking Accountability for the Unlawful Use of Force examines the many systems and accountability frameworks which have developed since the Second World War. By suggesting new avenues for enhancing accountability structures already in place as well as proposing new frameworks needed, this volume will begin a movement to establish the mechanisms needed to charge those responsible for the unlawful use of force.
Law

Prosecuting International Crimes: A Multidisciplinary Approach

Author: Bartłomiej Krzan

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN: 900432366X

Category: Law

Page: 326

View: 8025

The volume combines different views, backgrounds and underlying assumptions on the prosecution of international crimes. The contributions shed some additional, useful light that might prove helpful for identifying new dimensions of the reaction (judicial or other) towards international atrocities.
Law

Double Standards: International Criminal Law and the West

Author: Wolfgang Kaleck

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9788293081678

Category: Law

Page: 150

View: 7976

In this book, Wolfgang Kaleck, an internationally active human rights and criminal lawyer, assesses the practice of international criminal law to date and analyses one of its main weaknesses: International criminal justice purports to be universal, but in reality it often operates in a politically selective manner. Until now, hardly any of those most responsible for international crimes committed by Western states have faced trial. Against the backdrop of this criticism, the book advocates a truly universal practice of international criminal law which holds even the most powerful accountable for crimes they have committed. Kaleck also tells the stories of survivors of human rights violations and human rights organizations that struggle for universal accountability for international crimes. He argues that the proponents of universal criminal justice must actively address existing double standards, as "it will not be possible to speak of a universal criminal justice system with equal rights and access to justice for all until the instigators and organizers of Guantanamo and of the atrocities in Chechnya are held accountable for their actions.""
Law

The Hidden Hands of Justice

NGOs, Human Rights, and International Courts

Author: Heidi Nichols Haddad

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1108470920

Category: Law

Page: 225

View: 4538

As the first comprehensive analysis of NGO participation at international criminal and human rights courts, this book will interest a global and wide range of students, scholars, and NGOs in the fields of human rights, public international law, politics and international relations, and law and society.
Law

Supranational Criminal Law

A System Sui Generis

Author: Roelof Haveman,Olga Kavran,Julian Nicholls (LL. M.)

Publisher: Intersentia nv

ISBN: 905095314X

Category: Law

Page: 370

View: 1681

What exactly is the context in which all aspects of this new field of criminal law have to be interpreted? What does the principle of legality mean in the context of supranational criminal law? Which tradition lies at the basis of this new law system? Is supranational criminal law as it grows the result of a deliberate policy, tending towards a coherent system? Or is it merely the result of crisis management? Those are some of the questions that are highlighted in this first volume of the Supranational Criminal Law series.
Political Science

The Endtimes of Human Rights

Author: Stephen Hopgood

Publisher: Cornell University Press

ISBN: 0801469309

Category: Political Science

Page: 272

View: 4439

"We are living through the endtimes of the civilizing mission. The ineffectual International Criminal Court and its disastrous first prosecutor, Luis Moreno-Ocampo, along with the failure in Syria of the Responsibility to Protect are the latest pieces of evidence not of transient misfortunes but of fatal structural defects in international humanism. Whether it is the increase in deadly attacks on aid workers, the torture and 'disappearing' of al-Qaeda suspects by American officials, the flouting of international law by states such as Sri Lanka and Sudan, or the shambles of the Khmer Rouge tribunal in Phnom Penh, the prospect of one world under secular human rights law is receding. What seemed like a dawn is in fact a sunset. The foundations of universal liberal norms and global governance are crumbling."—from The Endtimes of Human Rights In a book that is at once passionate and provocative, Stephen Hopgood argues, against the conventional wisdom, that the idea of universal human rights has become not only ill adapted to current realities but also overambitious and unresponsive. A shift in the global balance of power away from the United States further undermines the foundations on which the global human rights regime is based. American decline exposes the contradictions, hypocrisies and weaknesses behind the attempt to enforce this regime around the world and opens the way for resurgent religious and sovereign actors to challenge human rights. Historically, Hopgood writes, universal humanist norms inspired a sense of secular religiosity among the new middle classes of a rapidly modernizing Europe. Human rights were the product of a particular worldview (Western European and Christian) and specific historical moments (humanitarianism in the nineteenth century, the aftermath of the Holocaust). They were an antidote to a troubling contradiction—the coexistence of a belief in progress with horrifying violence and growing inequality. The obsolescence of that founding purpose in the modern globalized world has, Hopgood asserts, transformed the institutions created to perform it, such as the International Committee of the Red Cross and recently the International Criminal Court, into self-perpetuating structures of intermittent power and authority that mask their lack of democratic legitimacy and systematic ineffectiveness. At their best, they provide relief in extraordinary situations of great distress; otherwise they are serving up a mixture of false hope and unaccountability sustained by “human rights” as a global brand. The Endtimes of Human Rights is sure to be controversial. Hopgood makes a plea for a new understanding of where hope lies for human rights, a plea that mourns the promise but rejects the reality of universalism in favor of a less predictable encounter with the diverse realities of today’s multipolar world.
Law

The United States and the International Criminal Court

National Security and International Law

Author: Sarah B. Sewall,Carl Kaysen

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield

ISBN: 9780742501355

Category: Law

Page: 266

View: 7943

In exploring American reluctance to join the International Criminal Court, this text illuminates a central dilemma facing US foreign policy; whether the U.S. can afford to remain estranged from international institutions that support norms and behaviours it has long championed.