Criminal courts

The International Criminal Court and Africa

Author: Evelyn A. Ankumah

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Criminal courts

Page: 676

View: 770

More than ten years ago the International Criminal Court (ICC) was established as a universal court meant to achieve criminal justice worldwide. That goal still stands, but so far the Court has dedicated most of its time and resources to African conflicts in which international crimes (may) have been committed. While the ICC can be said to contribute to criminal justice in Africa, it cannot be denied that the relationship between the Court and the continent has been troublesome. The ICC has been accused of targeting Africa, and many African states do not seem willing to cooperate with the Court. Debates on Africa and international criminal justice are increasingly politicized. The authors of this volume recognize the current problems and criticism. Yet they do not side with populist pessimists who, after just over a decade of ICC experiences, conclude that the Court and international criminal justice are doomed to fail. Rather, the contributors believe there is a future for international criminal justice, including the ICC. The contributors use their unique specific knowledge, expertise, and experiences as the basis for reflections on the current problems and possible paths for improvement, both when it comes to the ICC as such, and its specific relationship with Africa. [Subject: Criminal Law, African Law, International Law]
Political Science

The Palgrave Handbook of Peacebuilding in Africa

Author: Tony Karbo

Publisher: Springer

ISBN:

Category: Political Science

Page: 498

View: 932

This handbook offers a critical assessment of the African agenda for conflict prevention, peacemaking, peacekeeping, and peacebuilding; the challenges and opportunities facing Africa’s regional organisations in their efforts towards building sustainable peace on the continent; and the role of external actors, including the United Nations, Britain, France, and South Asian troop-contributing countries. In so doing, it revisits the late Ali Mazrui’s concept of Pax Africana, calling on Africans to take responsibility for peace and security on their own continent. The creation of the African Union, in 2002, was an important step towards realising this ambition, and has led to the development of a new continental architecture for more robust conflict management. But, as the volume’s authors show, the quest for Pax Africana faces challenges. Combining thematic analyses and case studies, this book will be of interest to both scholars and policymakers working on peace, security, and governance issues in Africa.
Law

International Criminal Law in Context

Author: Philipp Kastner

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Law

Page: 346

View: 357

International Criminal Law in Context provides a critical and contextual introduction to the fundamentals of international criminal law. It goes beyond a doctrinal analysis focused on the practice of international tribunals to draw on a variety of perspectives, capturing the complex processes of internationalisation that criminal law has experienced over the past few decades. The book considers international criminal law in context and seeks to account for the political and cultural factors that have influenced – and that continue to influence – this still-emerging body of law. Considering the substance, procedures, objectives, justifications and impacts of international criminal law, it addresses such topics as: • the history of international criminal law; • the subjects of international criminal law; • transitional justice and international criminal justice; • genocide, crimes against humanity, war crimes and the crime of aggression; • sexual and gender-based crimes; • international and hybrid criminal tribunals; • sentencing under international criminal law; and • the role of victims in international criminal procedure. The book will appeal to those who want to study international criminal law in a critical and contextualised way. Presenting original research, it will also be of interest to scholars and practitioners already familiar with the main legal and policy issues relating to this body of law.
Law

The Obligation to Extradite Or Prosecute

Author: Kriangsak Kittichaisaree

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN:

Category: Law

Page: 416

View: 431

Prosecution of serious crimes which are worthy of international concern were few and far between before the initiating of the International Criminal Court in 2002. Fifteen years later, there are still concerns. The United Nations International Law Commission's Working Group on the Obligation to Extradite or Prosecute submitted its own report on the issue in 2014, which has led to numerous, as of yet unanswered, questions. How far are states under an obligation to extradite criminals who shock the world? Are State officials immune from foreign criminal jurisdiction? How can we enforce universal jurisdiction? And what happens when there are competing rules regarding the surrender of persons to a competent international court? Written by the Chairman of that very Commission, Kittichaisaree provides a guide to the final report, offering an analysis of the subject and a unique summary of its drafting history. Authoritative, encyclopaedic, and essential to those in the field, The Obligation to Extradite Or Prosecute critiques the status quo and offers practical solutions as to the road ahead.
Law

The Sierra Leone Special Court and its Legacy

Author: Charles Chernor Jalloh

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN:

Category: Law

Page: 824

View: 479

The Special Court for Sierra Leone (SCSL) is the third modern international criminal tribunal supported by the United Nations and the first to be situated where the crimes were committed. This timely, important and comprehensive book is the first to critically assess the impact and legacy of the SCSL for Africa and international criminal law. Contributors include leading scholars and respected practitioners with inside knowledge of the tribunal, who analyze cutting-edge and controversial issues with significant implications for international criminal law and transitional justice. These include joint criminal enterprise; forced marriage; enlisting and using child soldiers; attacks against United Nations peacekeepers; the tension between truth commissions and criminal trials in the first country to simultaneously have the two; and the questions of whether it is permissible under international law for states to unilaterally confer blanket amnesties to local perpetrators of universally condemned international crimes.
Law

Africa and the International Criminal Court

Author: Gerhard Werle

Publisher: Springer

ISBN:

Category: Law

Page: 303

View: 760

The book deals with the controversial relationship between African states, represented by the African Union, and the International Criminal Court. This relationship started promisingly but has been in crisis in recent years. The overarching aim of the book is to analyze and discuss the achievements and shortcomings of interventions in Africa by the International Criminal Court as well as to develop proposals for cooperation between international courts, domestic courts outside Africa and courts within Africa. For this purpose, the book compiles contributions by practitioners of the International Criminal Court and by role players of the judiciary of African countries as well as by academic experts.
Law

The International Criminal Court in Search of its Purpose and Identity

Author: Triestino Mariniello

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Law

Page: 288

View: 428

The International Criminal Court (ICC) is the first permanent international criminal tribunal, which has jurisdiction over the most serious crimes of concern to the international community as a whole: genocide, crimes against humanity, war crimes, and crime of aggression. This book critically analyses the law and practice of the ICC and its contribution to the development of international criminal law and policy. The book focuses on the key procedural and substantive challenges faced by the ICC since its establishment. The critical analysis of the normative framework aims to elaborate ways in which the Court may resolve difficulties, which prevent it from reaching its declared objectives in particularly complex situations. Contributors to the book include leading experts in international criminal justice, and cover a range of topics including, inter alia, terrorism, modes of liability, ne bis in idem, victims reparations, the evidentiary threshold for the confirmation of charges, and sentencing. The book also considers the relationship between the ICC and States, and explores the impact that the new regime of international criminal justice has had on countries where the most serious crimes have been committed. In drawing together these discussions, the book provides a significant contribution in assessing how the ICC’s practice could be refined or improved in future cases. The book will be of great use and interest to international criminal law and public international law.
Law

International Law and Changing Perceptions of Security

Author: Jonas Ebbesson

Publisher: Hotei Publishing

ISBN:

Category: Law

Page: 372

View: 797

In International Law and Changing Perceptions of Security the contributors debate how changing concepts and conceptions of security have affected fields such as the use of force, law of the sea, human rights, international environmental law and international humanitarian law.
Criminal procedure (International law)

Prosecuting International Crimes in Africa

Author: Chacha Murungu

Publisher: PULP

ISBN:

Category: Criminal procedure (International law)

Page: 362

View: 343

"Prosecuting international crimes in Africa contributes to the understanding of international criminal justice in Africa. The books argues for the rule of law, respect for human rights and the eradication of a culture of impunity in Africa. it is a product of peer-reviewed contributions from graduates of the Centre for Human Rights, Faculty of Law, University of Pretoria, where the Master's degree programme in Human Rights and Democratisation in Africa has been presented since 2000"--Back cover.