History

The Labyrinth of Solitude

Author: Octavio Paz

Publisher: Grove Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 398

View: 201

Examines Mexican character and culture, pre-Columbian societies, and relations between Mexico and the United States
Literary Criticism

Uncivil Wars

Author: Sandra Messinger Cypess

Publisher: University of Texas Press

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 247

View: 395

The first English-language book to place the works of Elena Garro (1916–1998) and Octavio Paz (1914–1998) in dialogue with each other, Uncivil Wars evokes the lives of two celebrated literary figures who wrote about many of the same experiences and contributed to the formation of Mexican national identity but were judged quite differently, primarily because of gender. While Paz’s privileged, prize-winning legacy has endured worldwide, Garro’s literary gifts garnered no international prizes and received less attention in Latin American literary circles. Restoring a dual perspective on these two dynamic writers and their world, Uncivil Wars chronicles a collective memory of wars that shaped Mexico, and in turn shaped Garro and Paz, from the Conquest period to the Mexican Revolution; the Spanish Civil War, which the couple witnessed while traveling abroad; and the student massacre at Tlatelolco Plaza in 1968, which brought about social and political changes and further tensions in the battle of the sexes. The cultural contexts of machismo and ethnicity provide an equally rich ground for Sandra Cypess’s exploration of the tandem between the writers’ personal lives and their literary production. Uncivil Wars illuminates the complexities of Mexican society as seen through a tense marriage of two talented, often oppositional writers. The result is an alternative interpretation of the myths and realities that have shaped Mexican identity, and its literary soul, well into the twenty-first century.
Literary Criticism

Reading [email protected] Like a Queer

Author: Sandra K. Soto

Publisher: University of Texas Press

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 183

View: 827

A race-based oppositional paradigm has informed Chicano studies since its emergence. In this work, Sandra K. Soto replaces that paradigm with a less didactic, more flexible framework geared for a queer analysis of the discursive relationship between racialization and sexuality. Through rereadings of a diverse range of widely discussed writers—from Américo Paredes to Cherríe Moraga—Soto demonstrates that representations of racialization actually depend on the sexual and that a racialized sexuality is a heretofore unrecognized organizing principle of [email protected] literature, even in the most unlikely texts. Soto gives us a broader and deeper engagement with [email protected] representations of racialization, desire, and both inter- and intracultural social relations. While several scholars have begun to take sexuality seriously by invoking the rich terrain of contemporary Chicana feminist literature for its portrayal of culturally specific and historically laden gender and sexual frameworks, as well as for its imaginative transgressions against them, this is the first study to theorize racialized sexuality as pervasive to and enabling of the canon of [email protected] literature. Exemplifying the broad usefulness of queer theory by extending its critical tools and anti-heteronormative insights to racialization, Soto stages a crucial intervention amid a certain loss of optimism that circulates both as a fear that queer theory was a fad whose time has passed, and that queer theory is incapable of offering an incisive, politically grounded analysis in and of the current historical moment.
History

Mexico

Author: James Douglas Huck

Publisher: ABC-CLIO

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 399

View: 524

"Mexico: A Global Studies Handbook" is an ideal introduction to the United States' southern neighbor for students, travelers, businesspeople, or other interested readers. It debunks a variety of myths and misconceptions that have evolved over time, clarifying the realities of both historic and contemporary Mexico. "Mexico" offers an authoritative yet engaging tour of Mexican history and geography, as well its current economic and business climate, governmental structure, popular culture, and society. It also provides an alphabetically organized "mini-encyclopedia" for quick access to information on notable Mexican people, places, and events. Together, these sections provide everything readers need to understand Mexico's pre-Colombian origins, colonial legacies of dependence and Westernization, and its continuing efforts to craft a national identity.
Social Science

Curriculum Resources in Chicano Studies

Author: Gary D. Keller

Publisher: Bilingual Press

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 346

View: 316

This volume contains, at the under-graduate level, twenty course syllabi in the critical disciplines that impact the multidisciplinary field of Chicano studies. At the graduate level, a review of the production of Chicano-focused doctoral dissertations in the arts, the humanities, and the social sciences is provided.
Language Arts & Disciplines

Public Library Catalog

Author: Juliette Yaakov

Publisher: Hw Wilson Co

ISBN:

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 1434

View: 636

Highly recommended reference works in all subject areas and non-fiction books for adults, plus information on electronic editions when available. More than 8,000 books in the main volume. More than 2,400 new titles in annual paperbound supplements. More than 2,000 analytic entries for items in collections and anthologies.
History

First World Dreams

Author: Alexander Dawson

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 194

View: 928

This accessible book looks at the last twenty years of Mexico’s history. Under globalization, Mexico has opened its borders, reformed its political system, and transformed its economy. But Mexico's increasingly vibrant civil society is marred by Human Rights abuses and violent rebellion. ‘First World Dreams’ shows how market reforms have produced a stable economy, regular economic growth, and some vast fortunes, but have devastated much of the country-side and crippled domestic producers. Today Mexico remains a nation in a perpetual state of becoming; becoming a democracy, becoming a nation that respects human rights, becoming a modern industrial power, and yet also becoming more violent, more fragmented, and becoming a place where the chasms between wealth and poverty grow ever larger.