History

The Lancashire witches

Histories and stories

Author: Robert Poole

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 1847790216

Category: History

Page: 240

View: 4421

This book is the first major study of England's biggest and best-known witch trial which took place in 1612, when ten witches were arraigned and hung in the village of Pendle in Lancashire. The book has equal appeal across the disciplines of both History and English Literature/Renaissance Studies, with essays by the leading experts in both fields. Includes helpful summaries to explain the key points of each essay. Brings the subject up-to-date with a study of modern Wicca and paganism, including present-day Lancashire witches. Quite simply, this is the most comprehensive study of any English witch trial.
Social Science

The Lancashire Witches

A Chronicle of Sorcery and Death on Pendle Hill

Author: Philip C. Almond

Publisher: I.B.Tauris

ISBN: 0857732641

Category: Social Science

Page: 256

View: 3226

In the febrile religious and political climate of late sixteenth-century England, when the grip of the Reformation was as yet fragile and insecure, and underground papism still perceived to be rife, Lancashire was felt by the Protestant authorities to be a sinister corner of superstition, lawlessness and popery. And it was around Pendle Hill, a sombre ridge that looms over the intersecting pastures, meadows and moorland of the Ribble Valley, that their suspicions took infamous shape. The arraignment of the Lancashire witches in the assizes of Lancaster during 1612 is England’s most notorious witch-trial. The women who lived in the vicinity of Pendle, who were accused alongside the so-called Samlesbury Witches, then convicted and hanged, were more than just wicked sorcerers whose malign incantations caused others harm. They were reputed to be part of a dense network of devilry and mischief that revealed itself as much in hidden celebration of the Mass as in malevolent magic. They had to be eliminated to set an example to others. In this remarkable and authoritative treatment, published to coincide with the 400th anniversary of the case of the Lancashire witches, Philip C Almond evokes all the fear, drama and paranoia of those volatile times: the bleak story of the storm over Pendle.
Lancashire (England)

The Lancashire Witch Conspiracy

Histories and New Discoveries of the Pendle Witch Trials

Author: John A. Clayton

Publisher: Barrowford Press

ISBN: 9780955382123

Category: Lancashire (England)

Page: 264

View: 1462

The Lancashire Witch Conspiracy draws upon the experience of an author well versed and qualified in the history of his locality - namely the Forest of Pendle. John A Clayton provides here an in-depth study of the Lancashire Witch Trials of 1612 and, in so doing, many new discoveries of the event come to light. For instance; the most famous 'witch' of them all, Old Demdike (Elizabeth Southern), is found amongst the dusty records of Whalley parish church where she was both baptised and married. Demdike's husband, a farmer, brought his new wife and her illigitimate child into Pendle Forest and this would eventually trigger the trials at Lancaster of 19 people upon charges of witchcraft. The ancestors of Old Demdike, along with those of Chattox, Elizabeth Device, Alice Nutter et al are covered in a detail never before seen. The history of the Pendle Forest is covered in a depth that provides an unrivalled understanding of the subject of the Pendle Witches. The religious and political climate within the forest provide us with a fascinating idea of the times and, above all, new evidence is offered to show that the gentry would go to any lengths in the advancement of their estates - this would lead to tragedy for whole families within Pendle.
History

Witchcraft, the Devil, and Emotions in Early Modern England

Author: Charlotte-Rose Millar

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1134769881

Category: History

Page: 230

View: 5762

This book represents the first systematic study of the role of the Devil in English witchcraft pamphlets for the entire period of state-sanctioned witchcraft prosecutions (1563-1735). It provides a rereading of English witchcraft, one which moves away from an older historiography which underplays the role of the Devil in English witchcraft and instead highlights the crucial role that the Devil, often in the form of a familiar spirit, took in English witchcraft belief. One of the key ways in which this book explores the role of the Devil is through emotions. Stories of witches were made up of a complex web of emotionally implicated accusers, victims, witnesses, and supposed perpetrators. They reveal a range of emotional experiences that do not just stem from malefic witchcraft but also, and primarily, from a witch’s links with the Devil. This book, then, has two main objectives. First, to suggest that English witchcraft pamphlets challenge our understanding of English witchcraft as a predominantly non-diabolical crime, and second, to highlight how witchcraft narratives emphasized emotions as the primary motivation for witchcraft acts and accusations.

Der Liebesbund

Roman

Author: Mary Sharratt

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9783442735631

Category:

Page: 431

View: 6238

History

Witchcraft in Early Modern England

Author: James Sharpe

Publisher: Pearson Education

ISBN: 9780582328754

Category: History

Page: 144

View: 1899

With the renewed interest in the history of witches and witchcraft, this timely book provides an introduction to this fascinating topic, informed by the main trends of new thinking on the subject. Beginning with a discussion of witchcraft in the early modern period, and charting the witch panics that took place at this time, the author goes on to look at the historical debate surrounding the causes of the legal persecution of witches. Contemporary views of witchcraft put forward by judges, theological writers and the medical profession are examined, as is the place of witchcraft in the popular imagination. Jim Sharpe also looks at the gender dimensions of the witch persecution, and the treatment of witchcraft in Elizabethan and Jacobean drama. Supported by a range of compelling documents, the book concludes with an exploration of why witch panics declined in the late seventeenth century and early eighteenth century.
History

The Oxford Handbook of Witchcraft in Early Modern Europe and Colonial America

Author: Brian P. Levack

Publisher: OUP Oxford

ISBN: 0191648841

Category: History

Page: 646

View: 6203

The essays in this Handbook, written by leading scholars working in the rapidly developing field of witchcraft studies, explore the historical literature regarding witch beliefs and witch trials in Europe and colonial America between the early fifteenth and early eighteenth centuries. During these years witches were thought to be evil people who used magical power to inflict physical harm or misfortune on their neighbours. Witches were also believed to have made pacts with the devil and sometimes to have worshipped him at nocturnal assemblies known as sabbaths. These beliefs provided the basis for defining witchcraft as a secular and ecclesiastical crime and prosecuting tens of thousands of women and men for this offence. The trials resulted in as many as fifty thousand executions. These essays study the rise and fall of witchcraft prosecutions in the various kingdoms and territories of Europe and in English, Spanish, and Portuguese colonies in the Americas. They also relate these prosecutions to the Catholic and Protestant reformations, the introduction of new forms of criminal procedure, medical and scientific thought, the process of state-building, profound social and economic change, early modern patterns of gender relations, and the wave of demonic possessions that occurred in Europe at the same time. The essays survey the current state of knowledge in the field, explore the academic controversies that have arisen regarding witch beliefs and witch trials, propose new ways of studying the subject, and identify areas for future research.

Der Hexenhammer

Author: Jakob Sprenger

Publisher: Jazzybee Verlag

ISBN: 3849611426

Category:

Page: 583

View: 498

Die Serie "Meisterwerke der Literatur" beinhaltet die Klassiker der deutschen und weltweiten Literatur in einer einzigartigen Sammlung für Ihren eBook Reader. Lesen Sie die besten Werke großer Schriftsteller,Poeten, Autoren und Philosophen auf Ihrem Reader. Dieses Werk bietet zusätzlich * Eine detaillierte Abhandlung über die Geschichte der Hexe und der Hexenverfolgung. Der Hexenhammer (lat. Malleus Maleficarum) ist ein Werk zur Legitimation der Hexenverfolgung, das der Dominikaner Heinrich Kramer (lat. Henricus Institoris) nach heutigem Forschungsstand im Jahre 1486 in Speyer veröffentlichte und das bis ins 17. Jahrhundert hinein in 29 Auflagen erschien. Der Hexenhammer muss in engem Zusammenhang mit der sogenannten Hexenbulle des Papstes Innozenz VIII. vom 5. Dezember 1484 gesehen werden. Die päpstliche Bulle Summis desiderantes affectibus markierte zwar nicht den Beginn der Hexenverfolgungen in Europa, jedoch erreichte sie nun mit offizieller Beglaubigung durch das Oberhaupt der römisch-katholischen Kirche eine völlig neue Dimension. Kramer sammelt mit seinem Gehilfe Dr. theol. Johannes Gremper in seinem Buch weit verbreitete Ansichten über die Hexen und Zauberer. Im Hexenhammer werden die bestehenden Vorurteile übersichtlich präsentiert und mit einer vermeintlich wissenschaftlichen Argumentation begründet. Durch klare Regeln wird eine systematische Verfolgung und Vernichtung der vermeintlichen Hexen gefordert.Der Hexenhammer ist als scholastische Abhandlung verfasst und in drei Teile gegliedert. Im ersten Teil definiert Kramer, was unter einer Hexe zu verstehen sei. Gelegentlich spricht er zwar von männlichen Zauberern, bezieht sich aber hauptsächlich auf das weibliche Geschlecht. Seiner Meinung nach sind Frauen für die schwarze Magie anfälliger als Männer. Sie seien schon bei der Schöpfung benachteiligt gewesen, weil Gott Eva aus Adams Rippe schuf. Außerdem warf er den Frauen, die er als „Feind der Freundschaft, eine unausweichliche Strafe, ein notwendiges Übel, eine natürliche Versuchung, eine begehrenswerte Katastrophe, eine häusliche Gefahr, einen erfreulichen Schaden, ein Übel der Natur“ bezeichnet, Defizite im Glauben vor. Dies begründete er mit einer eigenwilligen Etymologie des lateinischen Wortes femina, das er aus lat. fides „Glauben“ und minus „weniger“ ableitete. Er unterstellte den Frauen sexuelle Unersättlichkeit. Deshalb hätten sie auch intimen Kontakt mit speziellen Dämonen (Incubi). Der Teufelspakt bilde zusammen mit der schlechten Veranlagung der Frauen und der göttlichen Zulassung die Grundlage für das gefürchtete Phänomen der Hexe. Die Männer fielen dem Zauber der Frauen zum Opfer. (aus wikipedia.de)
Fiction

MacBest

Ein Roman von der bizarren Scheibenwelt

Author: Terry Pratchett

Publisher: Piper ebooks

ISBN: 3492972268

Category: Fiction

Page: 352

View: 5773

Nachdem er den König erdolcht hat, besteigt der finstere Herzog Felmet gemeinsam mit seiner unausstehlichen Gattin den Thron. Der wahre Thronerbe, ein zweijähriger Junge, wurde indes von fahrenden Schauspielern adoptiert. Nur ein unschlagbares Team kann jetzt noch helfen: der Geist des Königs, Gevatter Tod und Oma Wetterwachs mit ihren hexenden Freundinnen. Gemeinsam ersinnen sie einen unglaublichen Plan, der selbst Shakespeares Macbeth das Fürchten und Lachen zugleich lehren würde...
Body, Mind & Spirit

Hexenprozess und Staatsbildung

Author: Johannes Dillinger,Universität Tübingen. Institut für Geschichtliche Landeskunde und Historische Hilfswissenschaften

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Body, Mind & Spirit

Page: 350

View: 1772

Dämonologie

in Form eines Dialoges unterteilt in drei Bücher

Author: Jakob I. (England, König),König von Schottland James VI.

Publisher: Joh. Bohmeier Verlag

ISBN: 9783890943916

Category:

Page: 86

View: 3572

Biography & Autobiography

Witchcraft and Whigs

The Life of Bishop Francis Hutchinson, 1660-1739

Author: Andrew Sneddon

Publisher: Manchester Univ Pr

ISBN: N.A

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 219

View: 9139

This ground-breaking biography of Bishop Francis Hutchinson (1669-1739) draws upon a wealth of primary source material, and provides a rare portrait of an early eighteenth-century Anglican bishop and witchcraft theorist.