History

The Market Revolution

Jacksonian America, 1815-1846

Author: Charles Sellers

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0199762422

Category: History

Page: 512

View: 3537

In The Market Revolution, one of America's most distinguished historians offers a major reinterpretation of a pivotal moment in United States history. Based on impeccable scholarship and written with grace and style, this volume provides a sweeping political and social history of the entire period from the diplomacy of John Quincy Adams to the birth of Mormonism under Joseph Smith, from Jackson's slaughter of the Indians in Georgia and Florida to the Depression of 1819, and from the growth of women's rights to the spread of the temperance movement. Equally important, he offers a provocative new way of looking at this crucial period, showing how the boom that followed the War of 1812 ignited a generational conflict over the republic's destiny, a struggle that changed America dramatically. Sellers stresses throughout that democracy was born in tension with capitalism, not as its natural political expression, and he shows how the massive national resistance to commercial interests ultimately rallied around Andrew Jackson. An unusually comprehensive blend of social, economic, political, religious, and cultural history, this accessible work provides a challenging analysis of this period, with important implications for the study of American history as a whole. It will revolutionize thinking about Jacksonian America.
Business & Economics

The Market Revolution in America

Social, Political, and Religious Expressions, 1800-1880

Author: Melvyn Stokes,Stephen Conway

Publisher: University of Virginia Press

ISBN: 9780813916507

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 351

View: 8768

This collection of essays by pre-eminent scholars in nineteenth-century history aims to respond to Charles Sellers' "The market revolution", reflecting upon the historiographic accomplishments initiated by his work, while at the same time advancing the argument across a range of fields.
Social Science

Brooks/Cole Empowerment Series: The Reluctant Welfare State

Author: Bruce S. Jansson

Publisher: Cengage Learning

ISBN: 1305177258

Category: Social Science

Page: 576

View: 856

Written in clear, lively prose by one of the foremost scholars of social welfare, this book analyzes the evolution of the American welfare state from colonial times to the present-placing social policy in its political, cultural, and societal context. Part of the BROOKS/COLE EMPOWERMENT SERIES, THE RELUCTANT WELFARE STATE, 8th Edition, aims to help students develop the core competencies and practice behaviors outlined in the 2008 Educational Policy and Accreditation Standards (EPAS) set by the Council on Social Work Education (CSWE). Rather than passively reading about social welfare history, students are asked to interact with the issues, oppressed populations, ethical choices, social and ideological conflicts, advocates, and policies in preceding eras and in the contemporary period-analytically and ethically. The author examines how social welfare policy connects to an empowerment perspective, showing how vulnerable populations, as well as social reformers, have achieved progressive reforms through policy advocacy. Important Notice: Media content referenced within the product description or the product text may not be available in the ebook version.
Architecture

When Church Became Theatre

The Transformation of Evangelical Architecture and Worship in Nineteenth-Century America

Author: Jeanne Halgren Kilde

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0199881723

Category: Architecture

Page: 328

View: 5924

For nearly eighteen centuries, two fundamental spatial plans dominated Christian architecture: the basilica and the central plan. In the 1880s, however, profound socio-economic and technological changes in the United States contributed to the rejection of these traditions and the development of a radically new worship building, the auditorium church. When Church Became Theatre focuses on this radical shift in evangelical Protestant architecture and links it to changes in worship style and religious mission. The auditorium style, featuring a prominent stage from which rows of pews radiated up a sloping floor, was derived directly from the theatre, an unusual source for religious architecture but one with a similar goal-to gather large groups within range of a speaker's voice. Theatrical elements were prominent; many featured proscenium arches, marquee lighting, theatre seats, and even opera boxes. Examining these churches and the discussions surrounding their development, Jeanne Halgren Kilde focuses on how these buildings helped congregations negotiate supernatural, social, and personal power. These worship spaces underscored performative and entertainment aspects of the service and in so doing transformed relationships between clergy and audiences. In auditorium churches, the congregants' personal and social power derived as much from consumerism as from piety, and clerical power lay in dramatic expertise rather than connections to social institutions. By erecting these buildings, argues Kilde, middle class religious audiences demonstrated the move toward a consumer-oriented model of religious participation that gave them unprecedented influence over the worship experience and church mission.
Biography & Autobiography

Wyatt Earp: A Vigilante Life

Author: Andrew C. Isenberg

Publisher: Hill and Wang

ISBN: 1429945478

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 320

View: 569

Finalist for the 2014 Weber-Clements Book Prize for the Best Non-fiction Book on Southwestern America In popular culture, Wyatt Earp is the hero of the Gunfight at the O.K. Corral in Tombstone, Arizona, and a beacon of rough cowboy justice in the tumultuous American West. The subject of dozens of films, he has been invoked in battles against organized crime (in the 1930s), communism (in the 1950s), and al-Qaeda (after 2001). Yet as the historian Andrew C. Isenberg reveals in Wyatt Earp: A Vigilante Life, the Hollywood Earp is largely a fiction—one created by none other than Earp himself. The lawman played on-screen by Henry Fonda and Burt Lancaster is stubbornly duty-bound; in actuality, Earp led a life of impulsive lawbreaking and shifting identities. When he wasn't wearing a badge, he was variously a thief, a brothel bouncer, a gambler, and a confidence man. As Isenberg writes, "He donned and shucked off roles readily, whipsawing between lawman and lawbreaker, and pursued his changing ambitions recklessly, with little thought to the cost to himself, and still less thought to the cost, even the deadly cost, to others." By 1900, Earp's misdeeds had caught up with him: his involvement as a referee in a fixed heavyweight prizefight brought him national notoriety as a scoundrel. Stung by the press, Earp set out to rebuild his reputation. He spent his last decades in Los Angeles, where he befriended Western silent film actors and directors. Having tried and failed over the course of his life to invent a better future for himself, in the end he invented a better past. Isenberg argues that even though Earp, who died in 1929, did not live to see it, Hollywood's embrace of him as a paragon of law and order was his greatest confidence game of all. A searching account of the man and his enduring legend, and a book about our national fascination with extrajudicial violence, Wyatt Earp: A Vigilante Life is a resounding biography of a singular American figure.
History

Gibbons v. Ogden, Law, and Society in the Early Republic

Author: Thomas H. Cox

Publisher: Ohio University Press

ISBN: 082144333X

Category: History

Page: 264

View: 4445

Gibbons v. Ogden, Law, and Society in the Early Republic examines a landmark decision in American jurisprudence, the first Supreme Court case to deal with the thorny legal issue of interstate commerce. Decided in 1824, Gibbons v. Ogden arose out of litigation between owners of rival steamboat lines over passenger and freight routes between the neighboring states of New York and New Jersey. But what began as a local dispute over the right to ferry the paying public from the New Jersey shore to New York City soon found its way into John Marshall’s court and constitutional history. The case is consistently ranked as one of the twenty most significant Supreme Court decisions and is still taught in constitutional law courses, cited in state and federal cases, and quoted in articles on constitutional, business, and technological history. Gibbons v. Ogden initially attracted enormous public attention because it involved the development of a new and sensational form of technology. To early Americans, steamboats were floating symbols of progress—cheaper and quicker transportation that could bring goods to market and refinement to the backcountry. A product of the rough-and-tumble world of nascent capitalism and legal innovation, the case became a landmark decision that established the supremacy of federal regulation of interstate trade, curtailed states’ rights, and promoted a national market economy. The case has been invoked by prohibitionists, New Dealers, civil rights activists, and social conservatives alike in debates over federal regulation of issues ranging from labor standards to gun control. This lively study fills in the social and political context in which the case was decided—the colorful and fascinating personalities, the entrepreneurial spirit of the early republic, and the technological breakthroughs that brought modernity to the masses.
History

McClellan's War

Author: Ethan S. Rafuse

Publisher: Indiana University Press

ISBN: 0253006147

Category: History

Page: 545

View: 6495

“An important book that rescues George B. McClellan’s military reputation.” —Chronicles Bold, brash, and full of ambition, George Brinton McClellan seemed destined for greatness when he assumed command of all the Union armies before he was 35. It was not to be. Ultimately deemed a failure on the battlefield by Abraham Lincoln, he was finally dismissed from command following the bloody battle of Antietam. To better understand this fascinating, however flawed, character, Ethan S. Rafuse considers the broad and complicated political climate of the earlier 19th Century. Rather than blaming McClellan for the Union’s military losses, Rafuse attempts to understand his political thinking as it affected his wartime strategy. As a result, Rafuse sheds light not only on McClellan’s conduct on the battlefields of 1861-62 but also on United States politics and culture in the years leading up to the Civil War. “Any historian seriously interested in the period will come away from the book with useful material and a better understanding of George B. McClellan.” —Journal of Southern History “Exhaustively researched and lucidly written, Rafuse has done an excellent job in giving us a different perspective on ‘Little Mac.’” —Civil War History “Rafuse’s thoughtful study of Little Mac shows just how enthralling this complex and flawed individual continues to be.” —Blue & Gray magazine
Language Arts & Disciplines

Just the Facts

How "Objectivity" Came to Define American Journalism

Author: David T.Z. Mindich

Publisher: NYU Press

ISBN: 0814764150

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 200

View: 8393

If American journalism were a religion, as it has been called, then its supreme deity would be "objectivity." The high priests of the profession worship the concept, while the iconoclasts of advocacy journalism, new journalism, and cyberjournalism consider objectivity a golden calf. Meanwhile, a groundswell of tabloids and talk shows and the increasing infringement of market concerns make a renewed discussion of the validity, possibility, and aim of objectivity a crucial pursuit. Despite its position as the orbital sun of journalistic ethics, objectivity—until now—has had no historian. David T. Z. Mindich reaches back to the nineteenth century to recover the lost history and meaning of this central tenet of American journalism. His book draws on high profile cases, showing the degree to which journalism and its evolving commitment to objectivity altered–and in some cases limited—the public's understanding of events and issues. Mindich devotes each chapter to a particular component of this ethic–detachment, nonpartisanship, the inverted pyramid style, facticity, and balance. Through this combination of history and cultural criticism, Mindich provides a profound meditation on the structure, promise, and limits of objectivity in the age of cybermedia.
History

Beyond the Farm

National Ambitions in Rural New England

Author: J. M. Opal

Publisher: University of Pennsylvania Press

ISBN: 0812203453

Category: History

Page: 280

View: 9382

During the first half-century of American independence, a fundamental change in the meaning and morality of ambition emerged in American culture. Long stigmatized as a dangerous passion that led people to pursue fame at the expense of duty, ambition also raised concerns among American Revolutionaries who espoused self-sacrifice. After the ratification of the U.S. Constitution and the creation of the federal republic in 1789, however, a new ethos of nation-making took hold in which ambition, properly cultivated, could rescue talent and virtue from the parochial needs of the family farm. Rather than an apology for an emerging market culture of material desire and commercial dealing, ambition became a civic project—a concerted reply to the localism of provincial life. By thus attaching itself to the national self-image during the early years of the Republic, before the wrenching upheavals of the Industrial Revolution, ambitious striving achieved a cultural dominance that future generations took for granted. Beyond the Farm not only describes this transformation as a national effort but also explores it as a personal journey. Centered on the lives of six aspiring men from the New England countryside, the book follows them from youthful days full of hope and unrest to eventual careers marked by surprising success and crushing failure. Along the way, J. M. Opal recovers such intimate dramas as a young man's abandonment by his self-made parents, a village printer's dreams of small-town fame, and a headstrong boy's efforts to both surpass and honor his family. By relating the vast abstractions of nation and ambition to the everyday milieus of home, work, and school, Beyond the Farm reconsiders the roots of American individualism in vivid detail and moral complexity.
Religion

An Unpredictable Gospel

American Evangelicals and World Christianity, 1812-1920

Author: Jay Riley Case

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0199912750

Category: Religion

Page: 328

View: 6644

The astonishing growth of Christianity in the global South over the course of the twentieth century has sparked an equally rapid growth in studies of ''World Christianity,'' which have dismantled the notion that Christianity is a Western religion. What, then, are we to make of the waves of Western missionaries who have, for centuries, been evangelizing in the global South? Were they merely, as many have argued, agents of imperialism out to impose Western values? In An Unpredictable Gospel, Jay Case examines the efforts of American evangelical missionaries in light of this new scholarship. He argues that if they were agents of imperialism, they were poor ones. Western missionaries had a dismal record of converting non-Westerners to Christianity. The ministries that were most successful were those that empowered the local population and adapted to local cultures. In fact, influence often flowed the other way, with missionaries serving as conduits for ideas that shaped American evangelicalism. Case traces these currents and sheds new light on the relationship between Western and non-Western Christianities.
Biography & Autobiography

The rise and fall of a frontier entrepreneur

Benjamin Rathbun, "Master Builder and Architectect"

Author: Roger Whitman,Scott G. Eberle,David A. Gerber

Publisher: Syracuse University Press

ISBN: N.A

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 241

View: 2704

This story of intrigue and scandal in the life of an early American businessman set during the raucous Jacksonian era brings to light a nearly forgotten tale of high-stakes intrigue, scandal, and financial ruin during a pivotal moment in the economic history of canaltown Buffalo and its western hinterland. Originally called Queen's Epic by the author, Roger Whitman's work probes beneath the surface of Benjamin Rathbun's startling career to reveal the unsettling social and economic forces that the American commercial revolution unleashed. When Rathbun's vast transportation, construction, and real estate empire finally collapsed under the weight of accumulated debt, shock waves rocked markets in the east. Amidst accusations of fraud, investors and currency speculators ran for cover in what soon became the nationwide Panic of 1837. After several decades of neglect, the manuscript was rediscovered and given a new title by editors Scott Eberle and David A. Gerber, who revived the book and shaped its historiographical context. The biography and history that emerges details a personal struggle to build stability, wealth, and rectitude in the shifting moral and economic sands of the Jacksonian era.
United States

America, History and Life

Author: Eric H. Boehm

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: United States

Page: N.A

View: 3785

Provides historical coverage of the United States and Canada from prehistory to the present. Includes information abstracted from over 2,000 journals published worldwide.
History

The American Civil War

explorations and reconsiderations

Author: Susan-Mary Grant,Brian Holden Reid

Publisher: Longman Pub Group

ISBN: 9780582318380

Category: History

Page: 366

View: 4772

B> With Brian Reid and Susan-Mary Grant from England, this book offers a non-US examination of the Civil War and brings together key writings on the most critical episodes of American history. This outsiders view eschews an overly reverential approach and combines multiple perspectives with the book arranged around four main themes: the political front, the military front, the home front and the ideological front. . Examines key protagonists, critical turning points, society, economy, slavery, civil liberties and nationalism. Those interested in the Civil War. Also available in Hardcover 0-582-31838-6.
Political Science

The Frozen Republic

How the Constitution is Paralyzing Democracy

Author: Daniel Lazare

Publisher: Harcourt

ISBN: N.A

Category: Political Science

Page: 393

View: 1331

Argues that our Founding Fathers' system of checks and balances created a government without direction or authority, and calls for the casting off of out-moded constitutional constraints
History

Women and Reform in a New England Community, 1815-1860

Author: Carolyn J. Lawes

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: History

Page: 265

View: 2465

Interpretations of women in the antebellum period have long dwelt upon the notion of public versus private gender spheres. As part of the ongoing reevaluation of the prehistory of the women's movement, Carolyn Lawes challenges this paradigm and the primacy of class motivation. She studies the women of antebellum Worcester, Massachusetts, discovering that whatever their economic background, women there publicly worked to remake and improve their community in their own image. Lawes analyzes the organized social activism of the mostly middle-class, urban, white women of Worcester and finds that they were at the center of community life and leadership. Drawing on rich local history collections, Lawes weaves together information from city and state documents, court cases, medical records, church collections, newspapers, and diaries and letters to create a portrait of a group of women for whom constant personal and social change was the norm. Throughout Women and Reform in a New England Community, conventional women make seemingly unconventional choices. A wealthy Worcester matron helped spark a women-led rebellion against ministerial authority in the town's orthodox Calvinist church. Similarly, a close look at the town's sewing circles reveals that they were vehicles for political exchange as well as social gatherings that included men but intentionally restricted them to a subordinate role. By the middle of the nineteenth century, the women of Worcester had taken up explicitly political and social causes, such as an orphan asylum they founded, funded, and directed. Lawes argues that economic and personal instability rather than a desire for social control motivated women, even relatively privileged ones, into social activism. She concludes that the local activism of the women of Worcester stimulated, and was stimulated by, their interest in the first two national women's rights conventions, held in Worcester in 1850 and 1851. Far from being marginalized from the vital economic, social, and political issues of their day, the women of this antebellum New England community insisted upon being active and ongoing participants in the debates and decisions of their society and nation.
Missouri

Missouri Historical Review

Author: Francis Asbury Sampson,Floyd Calvin Shoemaker

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Missouri

Page: N.A

View: 3423

History

Sectional Nationalism

Massachusetts Conservative Leaders and the Transformation of America, 1815-1836

Author: Harlow W. Sheidley

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: History

Page: 283

View: 7230

A study of conservatism in the early national period, focusing on the Boston-based leadership of Massachusetts during the years following the War of 1812.
Public welfare

The Reluctant Welfare State

American Social Welfare Policies--past, Present, and Future

Author: Bruce S. Jansson

Publisher: Wadsworth Publishing Company

ISBN: 9780534365516

Category: Public welfare

Page: 475

View: 5334

Much more than a historical look at America's social welfare system, this acclaimed book offers insights into our ambivalent social welfare policy and its impact on specific out-groups--African Americans, Latinos, Native Americans, women, and others--that are often overlooked in other texts. In addition to comprehensive coverage of the historical development of the welfare system, author Bruce S. Jansson also analyzes its limits, strengths, and policies...how its evolution and structure compare with systems in other countries...and the effects of policy changes on the future of the social work profession. As they explore Jannson's highly respected text, your students will see how understanding historical events can be powerfully relevant to the study of current social welfare policy and the profession of social work. The book analyzes the evolution of the American welfare state from colonial times to present and places social policy in its political, cultural, and societal context. Using social policy as a catalyst, Jansson invites students to think critically about issues, developments, and policies in prior eras and in contemporary society. He encourages students to become social reformers and to develop their own policy identities.
United States

Mid-America

An Historical Review

Author: N.A

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: United States

Page: N.A

View: 5718