History

The Market Revolution

Jacksonian America, 1815-1846

Author: Charles Sellers

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0199762422

Category: History

Page: 512

View: 9090

In The Market Revolution, one of America's most distinguished historians offers a major reinterpretation of a pivotal moment in United States history. Based on impeccable scholarship and written with grace and style, this volume provides a sweeping political and social history of the entire period from the diplomacy of John Quincy Adams to the birth of Mormonism under Joseph Smith, from Jackson's slaughter of the Indians in Georgia and Florida to the Depression of 1819, and from the growth of women's rights to the spread of the temperance movement. Equally important, he offers a provocative new way of looking at this crucial period, showing how the boom that followed the War of 1812 ignited a generational conflict over the republic's destiny, a struggle that changed America dramatically. Sellers stresses throughout that democracy was born in tension with capitalism, not as its natural political expression, and he shows how the massive national resistance to commercial interests ultimately rallied around Andrew Jackson. An unusually comprehensive blend of social, economic, political, religious, and cultural history, this accessible work provides a challenging analysis of this period, with important implications for the study of American history as a whole. It will revolutionize thinking about Jacksonian America.
History

The Market Revolution

Jacksonian America, 1815-1846

Author: Charles Sellers

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0199878641

Category: History

Page: 512

View: 1263

In The Market Revolution, one of America's most distinguished historians offers a major reinterpretation of a pivotal moment in United States history. Based on impeccable scholarship and written with grace and style, this volume provides a sweeping political and social history of the entire period from the diplomacy of John Quincy Adams to the birth of Mormonism under Joseph Smith, from Jackson's slaughter of the Indians in Georgia and Florida to the Depression of 1819, and from the growth of women's rights to the spread of the temperance movement. Equally important, he offers a provocative new way of looking at this crucial period, showing how the boom that followed the War of 1812 ignited a generational conflict over the republic's destiny, a struggle that changed America dramatically. Sellers stresses throughout that democracy was born in tension with capitalism, not as its natural political expression, and he shows how the massive national resistance to commercial interests ultimately rallied around Andrew Jackson. An unusually comprehensive blend of social, economic, political, religious, and cultural history, this accessible work provides a challenging analysis of this period, with important implications for the study of American history as a whole. It will revolutionize thinking about Jacksonian America.
History

What Hath God Wrought

The Transformation of America, 1815-1848

Author: Daniel Walker Howe

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0199726574

Category: History

Page: 928

View: 6190

The Oxford History of the United States is by far the most respected multi-volume history of our nation. In this Pulitzer prize-winning, critically acclaimed addition to the series, historian Daniel Walker Howe illuminates the period from the battle of New Orleans to the end of the Mexican-American War, an era when the United States expanded to the Pacific and won control over the richest part of the North American continent. A panoramic narrative, What Hath God Wrought portrays revolutionary improvements in transportation and communications that accelerated the extension of the American empire. Railroads, canals, newspapers, and the telegraph dramatically lowered travel times and spurred the spread of information. These innovations prompted the emergence of mass political parties and stimulated America's economic development from an overwhelmingly rural country to a diversified economy in which commerce and industry took their place alongside agriculture. In his story, the author weaves together political and military events with social, economic, and cultural history. Howe examines the rise of Andrew Jackson and his Democratic party, but contends that John Quincy Adams and other Whigs--advocates of public education and economic integration, defenders of the rights of Indians, women, and African-Americans--were the true prophets of America's future. In addition, Howe reveals the power of religion to shape many aspects of American life during this period, including slavery and antislavery, women's rights and other reform movements, politics, education, and literature. Howe's story of American expansion culminates in the bitterly controversial but brilliantly executed war waged against Mexico to gain California and Texas for the United States. Winner of the New-York Historical Society American History Book Prize Finalist, 2007 National Book Critics Circle Award for Nonfiction The Oxford History of the United States The Oxford History of the United States is the most respected multi-volume history of our nation. The series includes three Pulitzer Prize winners, a New York Times bestseller, and winners of the Bancroft and Parkman Prizes. The Atlantic Monthly has praised it as "the most distinguished series in American historical scholarship," a series that "synthesizes a generation's worth of historical inquiry and knowledge into one literally state-of-the-art book." Conceived under the general editorship of C. Vann Woodward and Richard Hofstadter, and now under the editorship of David M. Kennedy, this renowned series blends social, political, economic, cultural, diplomatic, and military history into coherent and vividly written narrative.
History

The Republic Reborn

War and the Making of Liberal America, 1790-1820

Author: Steven Watts

Publisher: JHU Press

ISBN: 9780801839412

Category: History

Page: 406

View: 7335

Business & Economics

The Market Revolution in America

Social, Political, and Religious Expressions, 1800-1880

Author: Melvyn Stokes,Stephen Conway

Publisher: University of Virginia Press

ISBN: 9780813916507

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 351

View: 6624

This collection of essays by pre-eminent scholars in nineteenth-century history aims to respond to Charles Sellers' "The market revolution", reflecting upon the historiographic accomplishments initiated by his work, while at the same time advancing the argument across a range of fields.
History

When the War Was Over

The Failure of Self-Reconstruction in the South, 1865--1867

Author: Dan T. Carter

Publisher: LSU Press

ISBN: 9780807112045

Category: History

Page: 304

View: 5601

In the months after Appomattox, the South was plunged into a chaos that surpassed even the disorder of the last hard months of the war itself. Peace brought, if anything, an increased level of violence to the region as local authorities of the former Confederacy were stripped of their power and the returning foot soldiers of the defeated army, hungry and without hope, raided the already impoverished countryside for food and clothing. In the wake of the devastation that followed surrender, even some of the most virulent Yankee-haters found themselves relieved as the Union army began to bring a small level of order to the lawless southern terrain. Dan T. Carter's When the War Was Over is a social and political history of the two years following the surrender of the Confederacy -- the co-called period of Presidential Reconstruction when the South, under the watchful gaze of Congress and the Union army, attempted to rebuild its shattered society and economic structure. Working primarily from rich manuscript sources, Carter draws a vivid portrait of the political leaders who emerged after the war, a diverse group of men -- former loyalists as well as a few mildly repentant fire-eaters -- who in some cases genuinely sought to find a place in southern society for the newly emancipated slaves, but who in many other cases merely sought to redesign the boundaries of black servitude. Carter finds that as a group the politicians who emerged in the postwar South failed critically in the test of their leadership. Not only were they unable to construct a realistic program for the region's recovery -- a failure rooted in their stubborn refusal to accept the full consequences of emancipation -- but their actions also served to exacerbate rather than allay the fears and apprehensions of the victorious North. Even so, Carter reveals, these leaders were not the monsters that many scholars have suggested they were, and it is misleading to dismiss them as racists and political incompetents. In important ways, they represented the most constructive, creative, and imaginative response that the white South, overwhelmed with defeat and social chaos, had to offer in 1865 and 1866. Out of their efforts would come the New South movement and, with it, the final downfall of the plantation system and the beginnings of social justice for the freed slaves.
Political Science

Most Uncommon Jacksonians

The Radical Leaders of the Early Labor Movement

Author: Edward Pessen

Publisher: SUNY Press

ISBN: 9781438415956

Category: Political Science

Page: 208

View: 2093

The age of Jackson saw the beginnings of America’s labor movement in the emergence both of trade unions and of the Working Men’s political parties. The leadership of this movement was one of its most outstanding and fascinating features. These radical leaders were “uncommon Jacksonians” in that they stood apart from both main currents of their day—the optimistic pursuit of material gain, and the moralistic criticism of that pursuit by traditionalists. They advocated a different, if minority, ideology, and it is this ideology that is Professor Pessen’s major concern in this book. The labor spokesmen were as diverse and complex as the movement they led. Some were employers rather than laborers and even the union leaders included men who had never actually soiled their hands in manual toil. In a sense these leaders were middle-class idealists interested in every variety of reform. They were drawn to labor largely because they believed it the most productive as well as the most victimized group in American society. For all their differences, however, the leaders’ social views were strikingly similar. They saw America as a class society dominated by the wealthy in general, capitalists in particular, with the control of government and the courts in the hands of the rich. Their picture of the contemporary social landscape was one marked by the poverty of the masses and vast disparities in wealth, power, and prestige. Greatly influenced by English radical thought, they rejected the Malthusian dictum that the poor were responsible for their own misery. They fixed the blame instead on a number of social institutions, the chief villain of which was private property. Without using the word “socialism,” the leaders’ vision of the good society was one in which no man profited from the labor of another, and the guiding principle was “to each according to his deeds.” Though a complex and often inconsistent phenomenon, the political movement represented by the early Working Men’s Parties was an authentic expression of labor’s views, Professor Pessen believes. This study challenges the legend that organized labor enthusiastically supported Jackson, and the longstanding myth that American labor movements have characteristically been conservative. Most Uncommon Jacksonians adds new perspectives to the history of American social thought.
History

Born in Bondage

Growing Up Enslaved in the Antebellum South

Author: Marie Jenkins Schwartz

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 9780674043343

Category: History

Page: 288

View: 1728

Each time a child was born in bondage, the system of slavery began anew. Although raised by their parents or by surrogates in the slave community, children were ultimately subject to the rule of their owners. Following the life cycle of a child from birth through youth to young adulthood, Marie Jenkins Schwartz explores the daunting world of slave children, a world governed by the dual authority of parent and owner, each with conflicting agendas. Despite the constant threats of separation and the necessity of submission to the slaveowner, slave families managed to pass on essential lessons about enduring bondage with human dignity. Schwartz counters the commonly held vision of the paternalistic slaveholder who determines the life and welfare of his passive chattel, showing instead how slaves struggled to give their children a sense of self and belonging that denied the owner complete control. "Born in Bondage" gives us an unsurpassed look at what it meant to grow up as a slave in the antebellum South. Schwartz recreates the experiences of these bound but resilient young people as they learned to negotiate between acts of submission and selfhood, between the worlds of commodity and community.
History

The Birth of Modern Politics

Andrew Jackson, John Quincy Adams, and the Election of 1828

Author: Lynn Hudson Parsons

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780199718504

Category: History

Page: 272

View: 3006

The 1828 presidential election, which pitted Major General Andrew Jackson against incumbent John Quincy Adams, has long been hailed as a watershed moment in American political history. It was the contest in which an unlettered, hot-tempered southwestern frontiersman, trumpeted by his supporters as a genuine man of the people, soundly defeated a New England "aristocrat" whose education and political résumé were as impressive as any ever seen in American public life. It was, many historians have argued, the country's first truly democratic presidential election. It was also the election that opened a Pandora's box of campaign tactics, including coordinated media, get-out-the-vote efforts, fund-raising, organized rallies, opinion polling, campaign paraphernalia, ethnic voting blocs, "opposition research," and smear tactics. In The Birth of Modern Politics, Parsons shows that the Adams-Jackson contest also began a national debate that is eerily contemporary, pitting those whose cultural, social, and economic values were rooted in community action for the common good against those who believed the common good was best served by giving individuals as much freedom as possible to promote their own interests. The book offers fresh and illuminating portraits of both Adams and Jackson and reveals how, despite their vastly different backgrounds, they had started out with many of the same values, admired one another, and had often been allies in common causes. But by 1828, caught up in a shifting political landscape, they were plunged into a competition that separated them decisively from the Founding Fathers' era and ushered in a style of politics that is still with us today.
History

Confederate Emancipation

Southern Plans to Free and Arm Slaves During the Civil War

Author: Bruce Levine

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0195147626

Category: History

Page: 252

View: 6931

Levine sheds light on such hot-button topics as what the Confederacy was fighting for, whether black southerners were willing to fight in large numbers in defense of the South, and what this episode foretold about life and politics in the post-war South.
Business & Economics

Time on the Cross

The Economics of American Negro Slavery

Author: Robert William Fogel,Stanley L. Engerman

Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company

ISBN: 9780393312188

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 306

View: 8441

Employs quantitative analyses to correct long-standing historical beliefs concerning the inefficiency of the slave system, the dispersion of Black families, and the material poverty of slaves
Literary Criticism

Religion and Sexuality in American Literature

Author: Ann-Janine Morey

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9780521103763

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 292

View: 4434

Although sometimes religion and sexuality are treated as an aberrant theme in American literary and religious history, American writers from Nathaniel Hawthorne to John Updike have been fascinated with the connection between religious and sexual experience. Through the voice of American fiction, Religion and Sexuality in American Literature examines the relations of body and spirit (religion and sexuality). Using both canonical and non-canonical fiction, Ann-Janine Morey examines novels dealing with the ministry as the medium wherein so many of the tensions of religion and sexuality are dramatised and then moves to contemporary novels that deal with moral and religious issues through metaphor. Based upon a sophisticated and selective application of metaphor theory, deconstruction and feminist postmodernism, Morey argues that while American fiction has replicated many traditional animosities, there are also some rather surprising resources here for commonality between men and women if we acknowledge and understand the intimate relationship between language and physical life.
Science

Military Enterprise and Technological Change

Perspectives on the American Experience

Author: Merritt Roe Smith

Publisher: MIT Press

ISBN: 9780262192392

Category: Science

Page: 391

View: 8492

Thomas J. Misa: Military Needs, Commercial Realities, and the Development of the Transistor, 1948-1958. - David K. Allison: U.S. Navy Research and Development since World War II. - David F. Noble: Command Performance. A Perspective on Military Enterprise and Technological Change. - Alex Roland: Technology and War. A Bibliographic Essay
Social Science

Advertising the American Dream

Making Way for Modernity, 1920-1940

Author: Roland Marchand

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 9780520058859

Category: Social Science

Page: 448

View: 9705

"A convincing and perceptive analysis that provides a careful sociological portrait of advertising agency people in the 1920s and 1930s. Marchand has rare talent for bringing out things in the ads that the reader would not have seen alone."--Michael Schudson, University of California, San Diego "This work illuminates some of the most important developments in twentieth-century America."--T.J. Jackson Lears, Rutgers University
History

Liberty and Power

The Politics of Jacksonian America

Author: Harry L. Watson

Publisher: Macmillan

ISBN: 0809065479

Category: History

Page: 313

View: 5603

As an engaging and persuasive survey of American public life from 1816 to 1848, this work remains a landmark achievement. Now updated to address twenty-five years of new scholarship, the book interprets the exciting political landscape that was the age of Jackson, a time that saw the rise of strong political parties and an increased popular involvement in national politics. In this work, the author examines the tension between liberty and power that both characterized the period and formed part of its historical legacy.
History

A Shopkeeper's Millennium

Society and Revivals in Rochester, New York, 1815-1837

Author: Paul E. Johnson

Publisher: Hill and Wang

ISBN: 1466806168

Category: History

Page: 240

View: 3407

A quarter-century after its first publication, A Shopkeeper's Millennium remains a landmark work--brilliant both as a new interpretation of the intimate connections among politics, economy, and religion during the Second Great Awakening, and as a surprising portrait of a rapidly growing frontier city. The religious revival that transformed America in the 1820s, making it the most militantly Protestant nation on earth and spawning reform movements dedicated to temperance and to the abolition of slavery, had an especially powerful effect in Rochester, New York. Paul E. Johnson explores the reasons for the revival's spectacular success there, suggesting important links between its moral accounting and the city's new industrial world. In a new preface, he reassesses his evidence and his conclusions in this major work.
Biography & Autobiography

The Great Triumvirate

Webster, Clay, and Calhoun

Author: Merrill D. Peterson

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0195056868

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 584

View: 2887

Looks at the three most influential politicians of the 1830s and 1840s and discusses the issues with which they were involved
Political Science

The Age of Reform

Author: Richard Hofstadter

Publisher: Vintage

ISBN: 0307809641

Category: Political Science

Page: 352

View: 2907

Winner of the Pulitzer Prize in Non-Fiction. This book is a landmark in American political thought. Preeminent Richard Hofstadter examines the passion for progress and reform that colored the entire period from 1890 to 1940 with startling and stimulating results. The Age of Reform searches out the moral and emotional motives of the reformers the myths and dreams in which they believed, and the realities with which they had to compromise.