Social Science

THEE PSYCHICK BIBLE

Author: Genesis Breyer P-Orridge

Publisher: Feral House

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 542

View: 362

Thee Temple ov Psychick Youth (TOPY) will be remembered for its crucial influence on youth culture throughout the 1980s, popularizing tattooing, body piercing, "acid house" raves, and other ahead-of-the-curve cultic flirtations and investigations. Its leader was Genesis P-Orridge, co-founder of Psychick TV and Throbbing Gristle, the band that created the industrial music genre. The limited signed cloth edition of Thee Psychick Bible quickly sold out, creating demand for any edition of this 544-page book, which will be available in a handsome smyth-sewn paperback edition with flaps and ribbon. According to author Genesis Breyer P-Orridge, "this is the most profound new manual on practical magick, taking it from its Crowleyan empowerment of the Individual to a next level of realization to evolve our species."
Music

The Encyclopedia of Popular Music

Author: Colin Larkin

Publisher: Omnibus Press

ISBN:

Category: Music

Page: 1600

View: 501

This text presents a comprehensive and up-to-date reference work on popular music, from the early 20th century to the present day.
Religion

Pop Pagans

Author: Donna Weston

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 288

View: 999

Paganism is rapidly becoming a religious, creative, and political force internationally. It has found one of its most public expressions in popular music, where it is voiced by singers and musicians across rock, folk, techno, goth, metal, Celtic, world, and pop music. With essays ranging across the US, UK, continental Europe, Australia and Asia, 'Pop Pagans' assesses the histories, genres, performances, and communities of pagan popular music. Over time, paganism became associated with the counter culture, satanic and gothic culture, rave and festival culture, ecological consciousness and spirituality, and new ageism. Paganism has used music to express a powerful and even transgressive force in everyday life. 'Pop Pagans' examines the many artists and movements which have contributed to this growing phenomenon.
Philosophy

Contemporary Esotericism

Author: Egil Asprem

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Philosophy

Page: 448

View: 650

The study of contemporary esoteric discourse has hitherto been a largely neglected part of the new academic field of Western esotericism. Contemporary Esotericism provides a broad overview and assessment of the complex world of Western esoteric thought today. Combining historiographical analysis with theories and methodologies from the social sciences, the volume explores new problems and offers new possibilities for the study of esoterica. Contemporary Esotericism studies the period since the 1950s but focuses on the last two decades. The wide range of essays are divided into four thematic sections: the intricacies of esoteric appeals to tradition; the role of popular culture, modern communication technologies, and new media in contemporary esotericism; the impact and influence of esotericism on both religious and secular arenas; and the recent 'de-marginalization' of the esoteric in both scholarship and society.
Music

Assimilate

Author: S. Alexander Reed

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN:

Category: Music

Page: 361

View: 796

Noisy, confrontational, and controversial, industrial music first emerged in the mid-1970s around bands and performance groups who combined avant-garde electronic music with the provocative attitude and style of punk rock. In its early days, bands such as Throbbing Gristle and Cabaret Voltaire produced a genuinely radical form of music bent on recontextualizing the signs and methods of cultural authority in an attempt to liberate listeners from the trappings of modernity. But, as industrial music took on more and more elements of popular music over the course of the 1980s it slowly abandoned its mission. By the mid-1990s, it was seen as simply another style of pop music, and had ironically fallen into the trappings it sought by its very existence to destroy. In Assimilate, S. Alexander Reed provides the first ever critical history of this fascinating and enigmatic genre tracing industrial music's trajectory from Throbbing Gristle's founding of the record label Industrial Music in 1976, to its peak in popularity on the back of the band Nine Inch Nails in the mid-1990s, and through its decline to the present day. Through a series of revealing explorations of works spanning the entirety of industrial music's past, and drawing on extensive interviews with musicians, record label owners, DJs, and concert promoters, Reed paints a thorough historical picture that includes not only the bands, but the structures that supported them, and the scenes they created. In so doing, he reveals an engaging story of an ideological disintegration and its aftermath. The definitive text on the genre, Assimilate is essential reading for fans of industrial music, and scholars and students of popular music alike.
Artists' books

Artist's Book Yearbook

Author: University of the West of England, Bristol. Faculty of Art, Media and Design

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Artists' books

Page:

View: 412

Religion

Ultraculture Journal

Author: Jason Louv

Publisher: CreateSpace

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 388

View: 374

Ultraculture Journal collects under one cover some of the most volatile and direct tantric and magickal writing currently available in the English language. It will change you at the cellular level. You have been forewarned. This issue includes: Genesis Breyer P-Orridge on the holographic Garden of Eden Brion Gysin's travelogue of his journey to Alamut, the citadel of the Assassins Lalitanath and Shivanath on the Magick Path of Tantra Jason Louv's essential guide to Western magick Beat legend Ira Cohen on John Dee and the Kumbh Mela, the biggest religious festival in the world Dave Lowe and Hans Plomp travel across India's mountains and rivers without end The psychedelic rantings of Ganesh Baba, the world's most tripped-out guru Johnny Templar broadcasts live from the tomb of Christian Rosenkreutz Joel Biroco on the "War on Terror" Prince Charming interviews Tibetan Tantric Adept Monica Dechen Gyalmo New lyrics from the late Jhonn Balance of Coil and Genesis Breyer P-Orridge Treasure chests full of rituals, reviews and wish-granting genies! Ultraculture Journal promises to catalyze a twenty-first century actually worth living in. Welcome to the psychedelic make-out party at the beginning of history. Jason Louv is the editor of Generation Hex (2005) and Thee Psychick Bible (2009).
Body, Mind & Spirit

John Dee and the Empire of Angels

Author: Jason Louv

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN:

Category: Body, Mind & Spirit

Page: 560

View: 363

A comprehensive look at the life and continuing influence of 16th-century scientific genius and occultist Dr. John Dee • Presents an overview of Dee’s scientific achievements, intelligence and spy work, imperial strategizing, and his work developing methods to communicate with angels • Pieces together Dee’s fragmentary Spirit Diaries and examines Enochian in precise detail and the angels’ plan to establish a New World Order • Explores Dee’s influence on Sir Francis Bacon, modern science, Rosicrucianism, and 20th-century occultists such as Jack Parsons, Aleister Crowley, and Anton LaVey Dr. John Dee (1527-1608), Queen Elizabeth I’s court advisor and astrologer, was the foremost scientific genius of the 16th century. Laying the foundation for modern science, he actively promoted mathematics and astronomy as well as made advances in navigation and optics that helped elevate England to the foremost imperial power in the world. Centuries ahead of his time, his theoretical work included the concept of light speed and prototypes for telescopes and solar panels. Dee, the original “007” (his crown-given moniker), even invented the idea of a “British Empire,” envisioning fledgling America as the new Atlantis, himself as Merlin, and Elizabeth as Arthur. But, as Jason Louv explains, Dee was suppressed from mainstream history because he spent the second half of his career developing a method for contacting angels. After a brilliant ascent from star student at Cambridge to scientific advisor to the Queen, Dee, with the help of a disreputable, criminal psychic named Edward Kelley, devoted ten years to communing with the angels and archangels of God. These spirit communications gave him the keys to Enochian, the language that mankind spoke before the fall from Eden. Piecing together Dee’s fragmentary Spirit Diaries and scrying sessions, the author examines Enochian in precise detail and explains how the angels used Dee and Kelley as agents to establish a New World Order that they hoped would unify all monotheistic religions and eventually dominate the entire globe. Presenting a comprehensive overview of Dee’s life and work, Louv examines his scientific achievements, intelligence and spy work, imperial strategizing, and Enochian magick, establishing a psychohistory of John Dee as a singular force and fundamental driver of Western history. Exploring Dee’s influence on Sir Francis Bacon, the development of modern science, 17th-century Rosicrucianism, the 19th-century occult revival, and 20th-century occultists such as Jack Parsons, Aleister Crowley, and Anton LaVey, Louv shows how John Dee continues to impact science and the occult to this day.