Cooking

Thug Kitchen 101

Author: Thug Kitchen

Publisher: Hachette UK

ISBN:

Category: Cooking

Page: 240

View: 958

The creators of the New York Times bestselling cookbook series Thug Kitchen are back to deliver you the sorta gentle, but always hilarious shove you need to take the leap into healthy eating. Thug Kitchen 101 includes more than 100 easy and accessible recipes to give you a solid start toward a better diet. TK holds your hand and explains ingredients from chickpeas to nooch so you'll feel confident knowing exactly what the f*ck you're cooking. This kickass kitchen primer also serves up health benefits and nutrition to remind everyone, from clueless newbies to health nuts, how a plant-based lifestyle benefits our bodies, minds, environment and wallets. THAT'S RIGHT. EAT GREEN, SAVE GREEN. So scared of commitment you can't even dedicate some time to cook? Thug Kitchen's here to fix that sh*t: All recipes in TK 101 are guaranteed to be faster than delivery, so you can whip up some tasty meals with simple ingredients regardless of when you stumble home from work. You're too damn important to be eating garbage, so TK has made it easy to take care of #1: you. No needless nonsense or preachy bullsh*t. Just delicious, healthy, homemade food for all the full-time hustlers out there.
Cooking

Thug Kitchen: The Official Cookbook

Author: Thug Kitchen

Publisher: Rodale

ISBN:

Category: Cooking

Page: 240

View: 772

Thug Kitchen started their wildly popular web site to inspire people to eat some Goddamn vegetables and adopt a healthier lifestyle. Beloved by Gwyneth Paltrow ("This might be my favorite thing ever") and named Saveur’s Best New Food blog of 2013--with half a million Facebook fans and counting--Thug Kitchen wants to show everyone how to take charge of their plates and cook up some real f*cking food. Yeah, plenty of blogs and cookbooks preach about how to eat more kale, why ginger fights inflammation, and how to cook with microgreens and nettles. But they are dull or pretentious as hell--and most people can’t afford the hype. Thug Kitchen lives in the real world. In their first cookbook, they’re throwing down more than 100 vegan recipes for their best-loved meals, snacks, and sides for beginning cooks to home chefs. (Roasted Beer and Lime Cauliflower Tacos? Pumpkin Chili? Grilled Peach Salsa? Believe that sh*t.) Plus they’re going to arm you with all the info and techniques you need to shop on a budget and go and kick a bunch of ass on your own. This book is an invitation to everyone who wants to do better to elevate their kitchen game. No more ketchup and pizza counting as vegetables. No more drive-thru lines. No more avoiding the produce corner of the supermarket. Sh*t is about to get real.
Social Science

The Vegan Studies Project

Author: Laura Wright

Publisher: University of Georgia Press

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 232

View: 265

This inescapably controversial study envisions, defines, and theorizes an area that Laura Wright calls vegan studies. We have an abundance of texts on vegans and veganism including works of advocacy, literary and popular fiction, film and television, and cookbooks, yet until now, there has been no study that examines the social and cultural discourses shaping our perceptions of veganism as an identity category and social practice. Ranging widely across contemporary American society and culture, Wright unpacks the loaded category of vegan identity. She examines the mainstream discourse surrounding and connecting animal rights to (or omitting animal rights from) veganism. Her specific focus is on the construction and depiction of the vegan body--both male and female--as a contested site manifest in contemporary works of literature, popular cultural representations, advertising, and new media. At the same time, Wright looks at critical animal studies, human-animal studies, posthumanism, and ecofeminism as theoretical frameworks that inform vegan studies (even as they differ from it). The vegan body, says Wright, threatens the status quo in terms of what we eat, wear, and purchase--and also in how vegans choose not to participate in many aspects of the mechanisms undergirding mainstream culture. These threats are acutely felt in light of post-9/11 anxieties over American strength and virility. A discourse has emerged that seeks, among other things, to bully veganism out of existence as it is poised to alter the dominant cultural mindset or, conversely, to constitute the vegan body as an idealized paragon of health, beauty, and strength. What better serves veganism is exemplified by Wright's study: openness, debate, inquiry, and analysis.