Health & Fitness

Undivided Rights

Women of Color Organize for Reproductive Justice

Author: Jael Miriam Silliman,Marlene Gerber Fried,Elena Gutiérrez,Loretta Ross

Publisher: South End Press

ISBN: 9780896087293

Category: Health & Fitness

Page: 331

View: 3601

Undivided Rights captures the evolving and largely unreported history of women of colour organizing themselves in their struggle for reproductive justice. This pioneering volume presents a fresh, textured, and expanded understanding of the reproductive rights movement by foregrounding the experiences, priorities, and activism of women of colour.Weaving together pieces from personal interviews, organizational files, and archived documents, the book features the groundbreaking work being undertaken by women of colour who have defined and implemented expansive reproductive health agendas. Rejecting legalistic remedies and seeking instead to address the wider needs of their communities, they stress the urgent need for innovative strategies that push beyond the traditional base and goals of the mainstream pro-choice movementâ__strategies that are broadly inclusive while being specifically effective.While raising tough questions about inclusion, identity politics, and the future of women's organizing, the authors offer a way out of the limiting focus on "choice," and articulate a holistic vision for reproductive freedom. With Undivided Rights, the authors echo the words of Lila Watson, an aboriginal activist:"If you have come to help me, please go away. But if you have come because your liberation is bound up with mine, let us work together."A read both inspiring and informative, this volume will be prized by activists and academics alike, who will come to look upon it as a foundational work in the annals of women's history.
Social Science

Women of Color and the Reproductive Rights Movement

Author: Jennifer Nelson

Publisher: NYU Press

ISBN: 0814758274

Category: Social Science

Page: 225

View: 2272

While most people believe that the movement to secure voluntary reproductive control for women centered solely on abortion rights, for many women abortion was not the only, or even primary, focus. Jennifer Nelson tells the story of the feminist struggle for legal abortion and reproductive rights in the 1960s, 1970s, and early 1980s through the particular contributions of women of color. She explores the relationship between second-wave feminists, who were concerned with a woman's right to choose, Black and Puerto Rican Nationalists, who were concerned that Black and Puerto Rican women have as many children as possible “for the revolution,” and women of color themselves, who negotiated between them. Contrary to popular belief, Nelson shows that women of color were able to successfully remake the mainstream women's liberation and abortion rights movements by appropriating select aspects of Black Nationalist politics—including addressing sterilization abuse, access to affordable childcare and healthcare, and ways to raise children out of poverty—for feminist discourse.
Social Science

Radical Reproductive Justice

Foundation, Theory, Practice, Critique

Author: Loretta Ross,Erika Derkas,Whitney Peoples,Lynn Roberts,Pamela Bridgewater

Publisher: Feminist Press at CUNY

ISBN: 1936932040

Category: Social Science

Page: 500

View: 5287

This anthology assembles two decades’ of work initiated by SisterSong Women of Color Health Collective, who created the human rights-based “reproductive justice” to move beyond polarized pro-choice/pro-life debates. Rooted in Black feminism and built on intersecting identities, this revolutionary framework asserts a woman's right to have children, not have children, and to parent and provide for the children they have.
Social Science

Reproductive Justice

An Introduction

Author: Loretta Ross,Rickie Solinger

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 0520288181

Category: Social Science

Page: 360

View: 2322

Reproductive Justice is a first-of-its-kind primer that provides a comprehensive yet succinct description of the field. Written by two legendary scholar-activists, Reproductive Justice introduces students to an intersectional analysis of race, class, and gender politics. Clearly showing how reproductive justice is a political movement of reproductive rights and social justice, the authors illuminate how, for example, a low-income, physically disabled woman living in West Texas with no viable public transportation, healthcare clinic, or living-wage employment opportunities faces a complex web of structural obstacles as she contemplates her sexual and reproductive intentions. Putting the lives and lived experience of women of color at the center of the book and using a human rights analysis, Loretta J. Ross and Rickie Solinger show how the discussion around reproductive justice differs significantly from the pro-choice/anti-abortion debates that have long dominated the headlines and mainstream political conflict. In a period in which women's reproductive lives are imperiled, Reproductive Justice provides an essential guide to understanding and mobilizing around women's human rights in the twenty-first century. Reproductive Justice: A New Vision for the Twenty-First Century publishes works that explore the contours and content of reproductive justice. The series will include primers intended for students and those new to reproductive justice as well as books of original research that will further knowledge and impact society. Learn more at www.ucpress.edu/go/reproductivejustice.
Education

Policing the National Body

Sex, Race, and Criminalization

Author: Jael Silliman,Anannya Bhattacharjee,Committee on Women, Population, and the Environment

Publisher: South End Press

ISBN: 9780896086609

Category: Education

Page: 352

View: 1413

This anthology explores the ways in which women of colour are monitored, criminalised and regulated.*BR**BR*This collection of essays places issues of race, class, and gender at the centre of the reproductive rights and social justice agendas by focusing on a key concern among women of colour and poor communities today — the difficulty of maintaining families and sustaining community in the face of increasing criminalisation and surveillance. *BR**BR*Contributors include Judith Scully, Cynthia Chandler, Carol Kingery, Syd lindsley, Pat Hynes, Janice Hamond, Rajani Bhatia, Betsy Hatman, Andrea Smith, Marlene Fried, Loretta Ross and Anne Hendrixson.
Social Science

Reproductive Justice: A Global Concern

Author: Joan C. Chrisler

Publisher: ABC-CLIO

ISBN: 0313393400

Category: Social Science

Page: 318

View: 9628

Every woman in the world has the right to control her own body, plan her family, receive good quality medical care, and give birth to a healthy baby. This book takes a comprehensive look at the status of women's reproductive rights from a transnational, human-rights perspective. • Contributions from 25 distinguished international scholars with research, practice, and public policy expertise on reproductive rights • Bibliography with each chapter • Concluding chapter on international public policy
Social Science

Dragon Ladies

Asian American Feminists Breathe Fire

Author: Sonia Shah

Publisher: South End Press

ISBN: 9780896085756

Category: Social Science

Page: 241

View: 7126

'Groundbreaking....Dragon Ladies explores the emergence of a distinct Asian American feminist movement through the rich perspectives of well-known Asian American activists, writers, and artists who analyze personal experiences through a political lens.' Ms. MagazineThis book showcases the growing politicization of Asian American women and their emerging feminist movement. These prominent writers, artists, and activists draw on a wealth of personal experience and political analysis to address issues of immigration, work, health, domestic violence, sexuality, and the media. In doing so, they seize the power of their unique political perspectives and cultural backgrounds to transform the landscape of race, class, and gender in the United States.
Social Science

Reproductive Justice

The Politics of Health Care for Native American Women

Author: Barbara Gurr

Publisher: Rutgers University Press

ISBN: 0813564700

Category: Social Science

Page: 216

View: 2839

In Reproductive Justice, sociologist Barbara Gurr provides the first analysis of Native American women’s reproductive healthcare and offers a sustained consideration of the movement for reproductive justice in the United States. The book examines the reproductive healthcare experiences on Pine Ridge Reservation, home of the Oglala Lakota Nation in South Dakota—where Gurr herself lived for more than a year. Gurr paints an insightful portrait of the Indian Health Service (IHS)—the federal agency tasked with providing culturally appropriate, adequate healthcare to Native Americans—shedding much-needed light on Native American women’s efforts to obtain prenatal care, access to contraception, abortion services, and access to care after sexual assault. Reproductive Justice goes beyond this local story to look more broadly at how race, gender, sex, sexuality, class, and nation inform the ways in which the government understands reproductive healthcare and organizes the delivery of this care. It reveals why the basic experience of reproductive healthcare for most Americans is so different—and better—than for Native American women in general, and women in reservation communities particularly. Finally, Gurr outlines the strengths that these communities can bring to the creation of their own reproductive justice, and considers the role of IHS in fostering these strengths as it moves forward in partnership with Native nations. Reproductive Justice offers a respectful and informed analysis of the stories Native American women have to tell about their bodies, their lives, and their communities.
Political Science

Fertile Matters

The Politics of Mexican-Origin Women's Reproduction

Author: Elena R. Gutiérrez

Publisher: University of Texas Press

ISBN: 0292779186

Category: Political Science

Page: 221

View: 9227

While the stereotype of the persistently pregnant Mexican-origin woman is longstanding, in the past fifteen years her reproduction has been targeted as a major social problem for the United States. Due to fear-fueled news reports and public perceptions about the changing composition of the nation's racial and ethnic makeup—the so-called Latinization of America—the reproduction of Mexican immigrant women has become a central theme in contemporary U. S. politics since the early 1990s. In this exploration, Elena R. Gutiérrez considers these public stereotypes of Mexican American and Mexican immigrant women as "hyper-fertile baby machines" who "breed like rabbits." She draws on social constructionist perspectives to examine the historical and sociopolitical evolution of these racial ideologies, and the related beliefs that Mexican-origin families are unduly large and that Mexican American and Mexican immigrant women do not use birth control. Using the coercive sterilization of Mexican-origin women in Los Angeles as a case study, Gutiérrez opens a dialogue on the racial politics of reproduction, and how they have developed for women of Mexican origin in the United States. She illustrates how the ways we talk and think about reproduction are part of a system of racial domination that shapes social policy and affects individual women's lives.
Religion

Jewish Portraits, Indian Frames

Women's Narratives from a Diaspora of Hope

Author: Jael Silliman

Publisher: UPNE

ISBN: 9781584653059

Category: Religion

Page: 208

View: 2963

Jewish Portraits, Indian Frames offers a personal and social history of the author's foremothers -- Baghdadi Jews who lived most of their lives in the Jewish community in Calcutta. Jael Silliman begins with a portrait of Farha, her maternal great-greandmother, who dwelled almost entirely within the Baghdadi Jewish community no matter where she and her husband traveled on business (Calcutta, Rangoon, Singapore). Next is her maternal grandmother, Miriam (Mary), who was much more Anglicized than Farha and deeply influenced by British colonial practices. The third portrait, of Silliman's mother, Flower, reveals a woman in a double transition: her own and India's. Flower grew up in colonial India, witnessed India's struggle for independence, and lived her middle years in an independent India. The final sketch is of Silliman herself. Born in Calcutta in 1955 in the waning Jewish community, Silliman grew up in a cosmopolitan and Indian world, rather than a Baghdadi Jewish one. Silliman's own travels have taken her to the US, where, as a teacher and scholar, her primary identification is with the "South Asian intellectual and professional diaspora." These rich family portraits convey a sense of the singular roles women played in building and sustaining a complex diaspora in what Silliman calls "Jewish Asia" over the past 150 years. Her sketches of the everyday lives of her foremothers -- from the food they ate and the clothes they wore to the social and political relationships they forged -- bring to life a community and a culture, even as they disclose the unexpected and subtle complexities of the colonial encounter as experienced by Jewish women.
Psychology

The Handbook of Ethical Research with Ethnocultural Populations and Communities

Author: Joseph E. Trimble,Celia B. Fisher

Publisher: SAGE

ISBN: 0761930434

Category: Psychology

Page: 366

View: 3564

The Handbook of Ethical Research With Ethnocultural Populations and Communities, edited by Joseph E. Trimble and Celia B. Fisher, addressES key questions in the first major work to focus specifically on ethical issues involving work with ethnocultural populations. Filling gaps and questions left unanswered by general rules of scientific conduct such as those embodied in federal regulations and professional codes, this Handbook will help guide ethical decision making for social and behavioral science research with multicultural groups for years to come.
Social Science

From Abortion to Reproductive Freedom

Transforming a Movement

Author: Marlene Gerber Fried

Publisher: South End Press

ISBN: 9780896083875

Category: Social Science

Page: 317

View: 8011

This anthology argues for an expansion of the single-issue abortion-rights movement into a multi-cultural feminist movement in the United States.
Political Science

Sterilized by the State

Eugenics, Race, and the Population Scare in Twentieth-Century North America

Author: Randall Hansen,Desmond King

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 110703292X

Category: Political Science

Page: 314

View: 9792

This book shows how eugenic sterilization policies were maintained after the 1940s in the United States and Canada despite the discrediting of such theories by comparable Nazi Germany policies. It focuses on the individual experience of victims of sterilization, the doctors concerned, and the mental health institutions that protected the system.
Social Science

The Doulas

Radical Care for Pregnant People

Author: Mary Mahoney,Lauren Mitchell

Publisher: The Feminist Press at CUNY

ISBN: 1558619496

Category: Social Science

Page: 240

View: 3635

As more feminism migrates online, full-spectrum doulas remain focused on life’s physically intimate relationships: between caregivers and patients, parents and pregnancy, individuals and their own bodies. They are committed to supporting a pregnancy no matter the outcome—whether it results in birth, abortion, miscarriage, or adoption—facing the question of choice head-on.

Women of Color and Feminism (Large Print 16pt)

Author: Maythee Rojas

Publisher: ReadHowYouWant.com

ISBN: 1458780872

Category:

Page: 344

View: 9427

In this Seal Studies title, author and professor Maythee Rojas offers a look at the intricate crossroads of being a woman of color. Women of Color and Feminism tackles the question of how women of color experience feminism, and how race and socioeconomics can alter this experience. Rojas explores the feminist woman of color's identity and how it relates to mainstream culture and feminism. Featuring profiles of historical women of color (including Hottentot Venus, Josefa Loaiza, and Anna Mae Pictou-Aquash), a discussion of the arts, and a vision for developing a feminist movement built on love and community healing, Rojas examines the intersectional nature of being a woman of color and a feminist. Covering a range of topics, including sexuality, gender politics, violence, stereotypes, and reproductive rights, Women of Color and Feminism offers a far-reaching view of this multilayered identity. This powerful study strives to rewrite race and feminism, encouraging women to ''take back the body'' in a world of new activism. Women of Color and Feminism encourages a broad conversation about race, class, and gender and creates a discourse that brings together feminism and racial justice movements.
Social Science

Black women in America

Author: Kim Marie Vaz

Publisher: Sage Publications, Inc

ISBN: N.A

Category: Social Science

Page: 396

View: 9931

A provocative, insightful volume, Black Women in America offers an interdisciplinary study of black women's historic activism, representation in literature and popular media, self-constructed images, and current psychosocial challenges. This new work of outstanding scholars in the field of race and gender studies explores the ways in which black women have constantly reconstructed and transformed alien definitions of black womanhood. Black women have an image of themselves that differs from those others impose. Collectively, the contributors to this anthology demonstrate that such socially constructed images hide the complexities and ambiguities, the challenges, and the joys experienced in the real lives of black women. Black Women in America is a welcome resource for scholars and students in African American or Ethnic Studies, Women's Studies, Sociology, and Psychology.
Family & Relationships

Giving Up Baby

Safe Haven Laws, Motherhood, and Reproductive Justice

Author: Laury Oaks

Publisher: NYU Press

ISBN: 1479806366

Category: Family & Relationships

Page: 288

View: 5905

“Baby safe haven” laws, which allow a parent to relinquish a newborn baby legally and anonymously at a specified institutional location—such as a hospital or fire station—were established in every state between 1999 and 2009. Promoted during a time of heated public debate over policies on abortion, sex education, teen pregnancy, adoption, welfare, immigrant reproduction, and child abuse, safe haven laws were passed by the majority of states with little contest. These laws were thought to offer a solution to the consequences of unwanted pregnancies: mothers would no longer be burdened with children they could not care for, and newborn babies would no longer be abandoned in dumpsters. Yet while these laws are well meaning, they ignore the real problem: some women lack key social and economic supports that mothers need to raise children. Safe haven laws do little to help disadvantaged women. Instead, advocates of safe haven laws target teenagers, women of color, and poor women with safe haven information and see relinquishing custody of their newborns as an act of maternal love. Disadvantaged women are preemptively judged as “bad” mothers whose babies would be better off without them. Laury Oaks argues that the labeling of certain kinds of women as potential “bad” mothers who should consider anonymously giving up their newborns for adoption into a “loving” home should best be understood as an issue of reproductive justice. Safe haven discourses promote narrow images of who deserves to be a mother and reflect restrictive views on how we should treat women experiencing unwanted pregnancy.
Social Science

Killing the Black Body

Race, Reproduction, and the Meaning of Liberty

Author: Dorothy Roberts

Publisher: Vintage

ISBN: 0804152594

Category: Social Science

Page: 384

View: 4403

The image of the “Welfare Queen” still dominates white America’s perceptions of Black women. It is an image that also continues to shape our government’s policies concerning Black women’s reproductive decisions. Proposed legislation to alleviate poverty focuses on plans to deny benefits to children born to welfare mothers and to require insertion of birth control implants as a condition of receiving aid. Meanwhile a booming fertility industry serves primarily infertile white couples. In Killing the Black Body, Northwestern University professor Dorothy Roberts exposes America’s systemic abuse of Black women’s bodies, from slave masters’ economic stake in bonded women’s fertility to government programs that coerced thousands of poor Black women into being sterilized as late as the 1970s. These abuses, Roberts argues, point not only to the degradation of Black motherhood but to the exclusion of Black women’s reproductive needs from the feminist agenda. Groundbreaking, authoritative, and timely, Killing the Black Body is both a powerful legal argument and a valuable aid for teachers, activists, and policy makers in creating a vision of reproductive freedom that respects each and every American.
History

Eugenic Nation

Faults and Frontiers of Better Breeding in Modern America

Author: Alexandra Stern

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 9780520244436

Category: History

Page: 347

View: 3564

""Eugenic Nation" is a masterful work that offers a bold and provocative argument about the impact of eugenics on California and the nation as a whole. Stern's analyses of US-Mexico immigration policy and 'eugenic landscapes' are particularly innovative and will surely change how subsequent scholars approach these topics."--Molly Ladd-Taylor, author of "Mother-Work: Women, Child Welfare and the State, 1890-1930" "At long last a book about eugenics in California, which sterilized more people than any other state. "Eugenic Nation" reveals what fueled the movement, including Hispanic immigration, fear of disease, and environmental preservation. In all, an important and thought-provoking book."--Daniel J. Kevles, author of "In the Name of Eugenics: Genetics and the Uses of Human Heredity" "Stern brilliantly exposes the dark role that the Golden State played as a leader in the closely-linked eugenics and early conservation movements. By demonstrating how theory became practice in California's institutions and laws, and how those ideas persist today, she reveals the survival of demons we thought we had vanquished."--Gray A. Brechin, author of "Imperial San Francisco: Urban Power, Earthly Ruin" ""Eugenic Nation" examines the science of 'better breeding' in the American West, revealing the intimate relations of race science, gender, sexuality, and population policy in the twentieth century. With this important book, Stern transforms our understanding of eugenics in the US."--Warwick Anderson, author of "The Cultivation of Whiteness: Science, Health, and Racial Destiny in Australia"