Juvenile Nonfiction

Voodoo in New Orleans

Author: Stephen Person

Publisher: Bearport Publishing

ISBN:

Category: Juvenile Nonfiction

Page: 32

View: 915

Recounts the life of Marie Laveau, a voodoo priestess thought to have the power to contact spirits and cast spells.
Social Science

Africanisms in American Culture

Author: Joseph E. Holloway

Publisher: Indiana University Press

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 436

View: 977

An important work in the field of diaspora studies for the past decade, this collection has inspired scholars and others to explore a trail blazed originally by Melville J. Herskovits, the father of New World African studies. Since its original publication, the field has changed considerably. Africanism has been explored in its broader dimensions, particularly in the area of white Africanisms. Thus, the new edition has been revised and expanded. Joseph E. Holloway has written three essays for the new volume. The first uses a transnational framework to examine how African cultural survivals have changed over time and readapted to diasporic conditions while experiencing slavery, forced labor, and racial discrimination. The second essay is "Africanisms in African American Names in the United States." The third reconstructs Gullah history, citing numerous Africanisms not previously identified by others. In addition, "The African Heritage of White America" by John Phillips has been revised to take note of many more instances of African cultural survivals in white America and to present a new synthesis of approaches.
Travel

Fear Dat New Orleans: A Guide to the Voodoo, Vampires, Graveyards & Ghosts of the Crescent City

Author: Michael Murphy

Publisher: The Countryman Press

ISBN:

Category: Travel

Page: 256

View: 453

By the author of the acclaimed Eat Dat, a brand-new guide to New Orleans's scary side, from Voodoo rituals to historic cemeteries and haunted mansions Fear Dat New Orleans explores the eccentric and often macabre dark corners of America’s most unique city. In addition to detailed histories of bizarre burials, ghastly murders, and the greatest concentration of haunted places in America, Fear Dat features a “bone watcher’s guide” with useful directions of who’s buried where, from Marie Laveau to Ruthie the Duck Girl. You’ll also find where to buy the most authentic gris-gris or to get the best psychic reading. The Huffington Post tagged Michael Murphy’s first book Eat Dat, about the city’s food culture, the #1 “essential” book to read before coming to New Orleans. New Orleans Living called it “both reverent and irreverent, he manages to bring a sense of humor to serious eating—and that’s what New Orleans is all about.” In Fear Dat, Murphy brings similar insights and irreverence to New Orleans voodoo, vampires, graveyards, and ghosts.
History

VOODOO IN NEW ORLEANS

Author: Robert Tallant

Publisher: Pelican Publishing Company

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 256

View: 441

"Interesting investigation and straightforward handling of sensational times and tricksters, of the cult of voodooism in all its manifestations. From its first known appearances in New Orleans of 200 years ago, here are the fetishes and formulae, the rites and dances, the cures, charms and gris-gris. Here were the witch-doctors and queens, and in particular a Doctor John who acquired fame and fortune, and Marie Laveau, who with her daughter dominated the weird underworld of voodoo for nearly a century." -Kirkus Reviews "Robert Tallant speaks with authority." -The New York Times "Much nonsense has been written about voodoo in New Orleans. . .here is a truthful and definitive picture." -Lyle Saxton Originally published in 1946, Voodoo In New Orleans examines the origins of the cult voodooism. The lives of New Orleans's most infamous witch doctors and voodoo queens have been re-created in this well-researched account of New Orleans's dark underworld.
Body, Mind & Spirit

The New Orleans Voodoo Handbook

Author: Kenaz Filan

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN:

Category: Body, Mind & Spirit

Page: 320

View: 676

A guide to the practices, tools, and rituals of New Orleans Voodoo as well as the many cultural influences at its origins • Includes recipes for magical oils, instructions for candle workings, and directions to create gris-gris bags and Voodoo dolls to attract love, money, justice, and healing and for retribution • Explores the major figures of New Orleans Voodoo, including Marie Laveau and Dr. John • Exposes the diverse ethnic influences at the core of Voodoo, from the African Congo to Catholic immigrants from Italy, France, and Ireland One of America’s great native-born spiritual traditions, New Orleans Voodoo is a religion as complex, free-form, and beautiful as the jazz that permeates this steamy city of sin and salvation. From the French Quarter to the Algiers neighborhood, its famed vaulted cemeteries to its infamous Mardi Gras celebrations, New Orleans cannot escape its rich Voodoo tradition, which draws from a multitude of ethnic sources, including Africa, Latin America, Sicily, Ireland, France, and Native America. In The New Orleans Voodoo Handbook, initiated Vodou priest Kenaz Filan covers the practices, tools, and rituals of this system of worship as well as the many facets of its origins. Exploring the major figures of New Orleans Voodoo, such as Marie Laveau and Dr. John, as well as Creole cuisine and the wealth of musical inspiration surrounding the Mississippi Delta, Filan examines firsthand documents and historical records to uncover the truth behind many of the city’s legends and to explore the oft-discussed but little-understood practices of the root doctors, Voodoo queens, and spiritual figures of the Crescent City. Including recipes for magical oils, instructions for candle workings, methods of divination, and even directions to create gris-gris bags, mojo hands, and Voodoo dolls, Filan reveals how to call on the saints and spirits of Voodoo for love, money, retribution, justice, and healing.
History

The Mysterious Voodoo Queen, Marie Laveaux

Author: Ina J. Fandrich

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 344

View: 587

This study investigates the emergence of powerful female leadership in New Orleans' Voodoo tradition. It provides a careful examination of the cultural, historical, economic, demographic and socio-political factors that contributed both to the feminization of this religious culture and its strong female leaders.
Dissertations, Academic

Voodoo in New Orleans

Author: Lea Michelle Griffin

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Dissertations, Academic

Page: 138

View: 777

ABSTRACT: When walking down the busiest streets in New Orleans, the word "Voodoo" can be seen everywhere. Voodoo is in the name of drugstores, bars, and even dishes in restaurants. Voodoo as a religion has been in existence in New Orleans for hundreds of years. However, Voodoo as a commodity of the city has developed more recently. This belief system not only serves many locals, but is also sold to many visitors to the city. Tourism is a reproduction of the concepts of a particular aspect of history or culture based on the perception of a group or groups. As is the case with most reproductions, tourist attractions are not exact replicas but rather interpretations of the events or cultures in question. This study examines how closely related these reproductions are to the original. Through the testimonials of both locals and tourists, the author illustrates the relationship between the visitors and practitioners, in order to illustrate the ambiguous line between imitative and authentic Voodoo. Even those who have practiced for years find it difficult to define the difference between real and performance. Ultimately, Voodoo belongs to the locals. It is a characteristic that helps define the city itself and gives New Orleanians a way to identify with the city in which they live.
Body, Mind & Spirit

Voodoo Hoodoo Spellbook

Author: Denise Alvarado

Publisher: Weiser Books

ISBN:

Category: Body, Mind & Spirit

Page: 320

View: 124

“Voodoo Hoodoo” is the unique variety of Creole Voodoo found in New Orleans. The Voodoo Hoodoo Spellbook is a rich compendium of more than 300 authentic Voodoo and Hoodoo recipes, rituals, and spells for love, justice, gambling luck, prosperity, health, and success. Cultural psychologist and root worker Denise Alvarado, who grew up in New Orleans, draws from a lifetime of recipes and spells learned from family, friends, and local practitioners. She traces the history of the African-based folk magic brought by slaves to New Orleans, and shows how it evolved over time to include influences from Native American spirituality, Catholicism, and Pentecostalism. She shares her research into folklore collections and 19th- and 20th- century formularies along with her own magical arts. The Voodoo Hoodoo Spellbook includes more than 100 spells for Banishing, Binding, Fertility, Luck, Protection, Money, and more. Alvarado introduces readers to the Pantheon of Voodoo Spirits, the Seven African Powers, important Loas, Prayers, Novenas, and Psalms, and much, much more, including:Oils and Potions: Attraction Love Oil, Dream Potion, Gambler’s Luck Oil, Blessing OilHoodoo Powders and Gris Gris: Algier’s Fast Luck Powder, Controlling Powder, Money Drawing PowderTalismans and Candle MagicCurses and Hexes
Photography

New Orleans Voodoo: A Cultural History

Author: Rory O'Neill Schmitt, PhD, and Rosary Hartel O'Neill, PhD

Publisher: Arcadia Publishing

ISBN:

Category: Photography

Page: 160

View: 521

There is no more compelling nor more spiritual city than New Orleans. The city's Roman Catholic roots and its blended French, Spanish, Creole and American Indian populations heavily influenced the rites and rituals that West Africans brought to Louisiana as enslaved laborers. The resulting unique Voodoo tradition is now deeply rooted in the area. Enslaved practitioners in the nineteenth century held Voodoo dances in designated public areas like Congo Square but conducted their secret rituals away from the prying eyes of the city. By 1874, some twelve thousand New Orleanians attended Voodoo queen Marie Laveau's St. John's Eve rites on the shores of Lake Pontchartrain. The Voodoo tradition continues in the Crescent City even today. Rory Schmitt and Rosary O'Neill study the altars, art, history and ceremonies that anchor Voodoo in New Orleans culture.