Law

Writing for Hire

Author: Catherine L. Fisk

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 0674973208

Category: Law

Page: 296

View: 870

Professional writers may earn a tidy living for their work, but they seldom own their writing. Catherine Fisk traces the history of labor relations that defined authorship in film, TV, and advertising in the mid-twentieth century, showing why strikingly different norms of attribution emerged in these overlapping industries.
Law

Writing for Hire

Author: Catherine L. Fisk

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 0674973208

Category: Law

Page: 296

View: 9303

Professional writers may earn a tidy living for their work, but they seldom own their writing. Catherine Fisk traces the history of labor relations that defined authorship in film, TV, and advertising in the mid-twentieth century, showing why strikingly different norms of attribution emerged in these overlapping industries.
History

Working in Hollywood

How the Studio System Turned Creativity into Labor

Author: Ronny Regev

Publisher: UNC Press Books

ISBN: 1469637065

Category: History

Page: 288

View: 8308

A history of the Hollywood film industry as a modern system of labor, this book reveals an important untold story of an influential twentieth-century workplace. Ronny Regev argues that the Hollywood studio system institutionalized creative labor by systemizing and standardizing the work of actors, directors, writers, and cinematographers, meshing artistic sensibilities with the efficiency-minded rationale of industrial capitalism. The employees of the studios emerged as a new class: they were wage laborers with enormous salaries, artists subjected to budgets and supervision, stars bound by contracts. As such, these workers--people like Clark Gable, Katharine Hepburn, and Anita Loos--were the outliers in the American workforce, an extraordinary working class. Through extensive use of oral histories, personal correspondence, studio archives, and the papers of leading Hollywood luminaries as well as their less-known contemporaries, Regev demonstrates that, as part of their contribution to popular culture, Hollywood studios such as Paramount, Warner Bros., and MGM cultivated a new form of labor, one that made work seem like fantasy.
Law

Authors in Court

Author: Mark Rose

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 0674969944

Category: Law

Page: 233

View: 3524

Mark Rose uses case studies to show how gender and gentility have influenced the self-presentation of authors in court and how the personal styles, public personas, and histories of novelists, dramatists, poets, photographers, and cartoonists have influenced the development of legal doctrine around issues of copyright.
Law

The Oxford Handbook of Legal History

Author: Markus D. Dubber,Christopher Tomlins

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0192513141

Category: Law

Page: 1152

View: 4347

Some of the most exciting and innovative legal scholarship has been driven by historical curiosity. Legal history today comes in a fascinating array of shapes and sizes, from microhistory to global intellectual history. Legal history has expanded beyond traditional parochial boundaries to become increasingly international and comparative in scope and orientation. Drawing on scholarship from around the world, and representing a variety of methodological approaches, areas of expertise, and research agendas, this timely compendium takes stock of legal history and methodology and reflects on the various modes of the historical analysis of law, past, present, and future. Part I explores the relationship between legal history and other disciplinary perspectives including economic, philosophical, comparative, literary, and rhetorical analysis of law. Part II considers various approaches to legal history, including legal history as doctrinal, intellectual, or social history. Part III focuses on the interrelation between legal history and jurisprudence by investigating the role and conception of historical inquiry in various models, schools, and movements of legal thought. Part IV traces the place and pursuit of historical analysis in various legal systems and traditions across time, cultures, and space. Finally, Part V narrows the Handbooks focus to explore several examples of legal history in action, including its use in various legal doctrinal contexts.
Social Science

The Death and Life of Great American Cities

Author: Jane Jacobs

Publisher: Vintage

ISBN: 052543285X

Category: Social Science

Page: 480

View: 2432

Thirty years after its publication, The Death and Life of Great American Cities was described by The New York Times as "perhaps the most influential single work in the history of town planning....[It] can also be seen in a much larger context. It is first of all a work of literature; the descriptions of street life as a kind of ballet and the bitingly satiric account of traditional planning theory can still be read for pleasure even by those who long ago absorbed and appropriated the book's arguments." Jane Jacobs, an editor and writer on architecture in New York City in the early sixties, argued that urban diversity and vitality were being destroyed by powerful architects and city planners. Rigorous, sane, and delightfully epigrammatic, Jacobs's small masterpiece is a blueprint for the humanistic management of cities. It is sensible, knowledgeable, readable, indispensable. The author has written a new foreword for this Modern Library edition.

The Death Penalty As Torture

From the Dark Ages to Abolition

Author: John D. Bessler

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9781611639261

Category:

Page: 460

View: 7852

During the Dark Ages and the Renaissance, Europe¿s monarchs often resorted to torture and executions. The pain inflicted by instruments of torture¿from the thumbscrew and the rack to the Inquisition¿s tools of torment¿was eclipsed only by horrific methods of execution, from breaking on the wheel and crucifixion to drawing and quartering and burning at the stake. The English ¿Bloody Code¿ made more than 200 crimes punishable by death, and judicial torture¿expressly authorized by law and used to extract confessions¿permeated continental European legal systems. Judges regularly imposed death sentences and other harsh corporal punishments, from the stocks and the pillory, to branding and ear cropping, to lashes at public whipping posts. In the Enlightenment, jurists and writers questioned the efficacy of torture and capital punishment. In 1764, the Italian philosopher Cesare Beccaria¿the father of the world¿s anti¿death penalty movement¿condemned both practices. And Montesquieu, like Beccaria and others, concluded that any punishment that goes beyond absolute necessity is tyrannical. Traditionally, torture and executions have been viewed in separate legal silos, with countries renouncing acts of torture while simultaneously using capital punishment. The UN Convention Against Torture strictly prohibits physical or psychological torture; not even war or threat of war can be invoked to justify it. But under the guise of ¿lawful sanctions,¿ some countries continue to carry out executions even though they bear the indicia of torture. In The Death Penalty as Torture, Prof. John Bessler argues that death sentences and executions are medieval relics. In a world in which ¿mock¿ or simulated executions, as well as a host of other non-lethal acts, are already considered to be torturous, he contends that death sentences and executions should be classified under the rubric of torture. Unlike in the Middle Ages, penitentiaries¿one of the products of the Enlightenment¿now exist throughout the globe to house violent offenders. With the rise of life without parole sentences, and with more than four of five nations no longer using executions, The Death Penalty as Torture calls for the recognition of a peremptory, international law norm against the death penalty¿s use.
Fiction

The Man in the Gray Flannel Suit

Author: Sloan Wilson

Publisher: Da Capo Press

ISBN: 0786729260

Category: Fiction

Page: 288

View: 5825

Universally acclaimed when first published in 1955, The Man in the Gray Flannel Suit captured the mood of a generation. Its title — like Catch-22 and Fahrenheit 451 — has become a part of America's cultural vocabulary. Tom Rath doesn't want anything extraordinary out of life: just a decent home, enough money to support his family, and a career that won't crush his spirit. After returning from World War II, he takes a PR job at a television network. It is inane, dehumanizing work. But when a series of personal crises force him to reexamine his priorities — and take responsibility for his past — he is finally moved to carve out an identity for himself. This is Sloan Wilson's searing indictment of a society that had just begun to lose touch with its citizens. The Man in the Gray Flannel Suit is a classic of American literature and the basis of the award-winning film starring Gregory Peck. "A consequential novel." — Saturday Review
Law

Working Knowledge

Employee Innovation and the Rise of Corporate Intellectual Property, 1800-1930

Author: Catherine L. Fisk

Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press

ISBN: 9780807899069

Category: Law

Page: 376

View: 4270

Skilled workers of the early nineteenth century enjoyed a degree of professional independence because workplace knowledge and technical skill were their "property," or at least their attribute. In most sectors of today's economy, however, it is a foundational and widely accepted truth that businesses retain legal ownership of employee-generated intellectual property. In Working Knowledge, Catherine Fisk chronicles the legal and social transformations that led to the transfer of ownership of employee innovation from labor to management. This deeply contested development was won at the expense of workers' entrepreneurial independence and ultimately, Fisk argues, economic democracy. By reviewing judicial decisions and legal scholarship on all aspects of employee-generated intellectual property and combing the archives of major nineteenth-century intellectual property-producing companies--including DuPont, Rand McNally, and the American Tobacco Company--Fisk makes a highly technical area of law accessible to general readers while also addressing scholarly deficiencies in the histories of labor, intellectual property, and the business of technology.
Self-Help

How to win friends & influence people

Author: Dale Carnegie

Publisher: Diamond Pocket Books Pvt Ltd

ISBN: 9352613937

Category: Self-Help

Page: 224

View: 4688

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Business & Economics

Fast Food Nation

The Dark Side of the All-American Meal

Author: Eric Schlosser

Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt

ISBN: 0547750331

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 362

View: 8144

Explores the homogenization of American culture and the impact of the fast food industry on modern-day health, economy, politics, popular culture, entertainment, and food production.
Biography & Autobiography

We're Going to Need More Wine

Stories That Are Funny, Complicated, and True

Author: Gabrielle Union

Publisher: HarperCollins

ISBN: 0062694006

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 272

View: 2814

NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER Nominated for the NAACP Image Award for Outstanding Literary Work Named a Best Book of the Year by The Root Chosen by Emma Straub as a Best New Celebrity Memoir “A book of essays as raw and honest as anyone has ever produced.” — Lena Dunham, Lenny Letter In the spirit of Amy Poehler’s Yes Please, Lena Dunham’s Not That Kind of Girl, and Roxane Gay's Bad Feminist, a powerful collection of essays about gender, sexuality, race, beauty, Hollywood, and what it means to be a modern woman. One month before the release of the highly anticipated film The Birth of a Nation, actress Gabrielle Union shook the world with a vulnerable and impassioned editorial in which she urged our society to have compassion for victims of sexual violence. In the wake of rape allegations made against director and actor Nate Parker, Union—a forty-four-year-old actress who launched her career with roles in iconic ’90s movies—instantly became the insightful, outspoken actress that Hollywood has been desperately awaiting. With honesty and heartbreaking wisdom, she revealed her own trauma as a victim of sexual assault: "It is for you that I am speaking. This is real. We are real." In this moving collection of thought provoking essays infused with her unique wisdom and deep humor, Union uses that same fearlessness to tell astonishingly personal and true stories about power, color, gender, feminism, and fame. Union tackles a range of experiences, including bullying, beauty standards, and competition between women in Hollywood, growing up in white California suburbia and then spending summers with her black relatives in Nebraska, coping with crushes, puberty, and the divorce of her parents. Genuine and perceptive, Union bravely lays herself bare, uncovering a complex and courageous life of self-doubt and self-discovery with incredible poise and brutal honesty. Throughout, she compels us to be ethical and empathetic, and reminds us of the importance of confidence, self-awareness, and the power of sharing truth, laughter, and support.

Democracy of Sound

Music Piracy and the Remaking of American Copyright in the Twentieth Century

Author: Alex Sayf Cummings

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 019067511X

Category:

Page: 274

View: 7849

It was a time when music fans copied and traded recordings without permission. An outraged music industry pushed Congress to pass anti-piracy legislation. Yes, that time is now; it was also the era of Napster in the 1990s, of cassette tapes in the 1970s, of reel-to-reel tapes in the 1950s, even the phonograph epoch of the 1930s. Piracy, it turns out, is as old as recorded music itself. In Democracy of Sound, Alex Sayf Cummings uncovers the little-known history of music piracy and its sweeping effects on the definition of copyright in the United States. When copyright emerged, only visual material such as books and maps were thought to deserve protection; even musical compositions were not included until 1831. Once a performance could be captured on a wax cylinder or vinyl disc, profound questions arose over the meaning of intellectual property. Is only a written composition defined as a piece of art? If a singer performs a different interpretation of a song, is it a new and distinct work? Such questions have only grown more pressing with the rise of sampling and other forms of musical pastiche. Indeed, music has become the prime battleground between piracy and copyright. It is compact, making it easy to copy. And it is highly social, shared or traded through social networks--often networks that arise around music itself. But such networks also pose a counter-argument: as channels for copying and sharing sounds, they were instrumental in nourishing hip-hop and other new forms of music central to American culture today. Piracy is not always a bad thing. An insightful and often entertaining look at the history of music piracy, Democracy of Sound offers invaluable background to one of the hot-button issues involving creativity and the law.
Reference

How to Write for Animation

Author: Jeffrey Scott

Publisher: The Overlook Press

ISBN: 1468304275

Category: Reference

Page: 224

View: 7901

How to Write for Animation is the ultimate guide for anyone with ambitions of writing for the most rapidly developing medium in all of entertainment. In recent years, the world of animation has expanded far beyond the Saturday morning cartoons that generations of Americans grew up watching. Recent years have seen a boom in animation—hit prime-time television series, blockbuster cutting-edge digitally animated features, conventional animation. The expanding market is luring writers who have an eye toward the future and an eagerness to work in a medium where the only limit is the depth on one’s imagination. With step-by-step instructions and the insights of a seasoned veteran, award-winning animation writer Jeffrey Scott details the process of developing even the vaguest of ideas into a fully realized animation script. He details every stop on the road from inspiration to presentation, with sections on premises, outlines, treatments, description, and dialogue, and much more.
Law

International Intellectual Property

A Handbook of Contemporary Research

Author: Daniel J. Gervais

Publisher: Edward Elgar Publishing

ISBN: 1782544801

Category: Law

Page: 512

View: 2175

International Intellectual Property: A Handbook of Contemporary Research provides researchers and practitioners of international intellectual property law with the necessary tools to understand the latest debates in this incredibly dynamic and complex
Business & Economics

The Art of Immersion: How the Digital Generation Is Remaking Hollywood, Madison Avenue, and the Way We Tell Stories

Author: Frank Rose

Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company

ISBN: 0393341259

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 384

View: 9335

A contributing editor at Wired examines the way entertainment has shifted in the face of new media and discusses the way that people such as Will Wright, James Cameron and Damon Lindelof are changing how we play, relax and think. Reprint.
Law

Labor Law in the Contemporary Workplace

Author: Kenneth G. Dau-Schmidt,Martin H. Malin,Roberto L. Corrada,Christopher David Ruiz Cameron,Catherine L. Fisk

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9780314289360

Category: Law

Page: 1257

View: 2460

Labor Law in the Contemporary Workplace is organized around contemporary problems as a means of teaching the core principles of labor law. It prepares students for the practice of labor law in the contemporary workplace by introducing them to the principles of American labor law and many of the issues that labor law attorneys face. Although the primary focus of the book is the National Labor Relations Act, considerable attention is given to the Railway Labor Act and public-sector labor laws because of their growing relative importance in contemporary practice. The second edition takes account of changes in the law since the first edition was published and in particular new interpretations of the National Labor Relations Act by the National Labor Relations Board and recent state restrictions on public sector collective bargaining.
Business & Economics

The CIO's left-led unions

Author: Steven Rosswurm

Publisher: Rutgers Univ Pr

ISBN: N.A

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 250

View: 6409