Fiction

100% - The Story of a Patriot

Author: Upton Sinclair

Publisher: Lulu Press, Inc

ISBN:

Category: Fiction

Page:

View: 316

100%: The Story of a Patriot is a book of fictional responses to Sinclair’s real-life social and economic concerns. It tells the story of Peter Gudge, a poor young man who becomes embroiled in industrial spying and sabotage. Said to be based upon a real case of a bombing in San Francisco, Peter’s tale is compelling reading. The story of the White Terror, and how “big business” pulled off the stunt of landing the “reds” in jail. It is the inside story of a “secret agent,” and deals with half a dozen celebrated cases concerning which you have been fooled - the story of a young man’s descent into fear and corruption, and eventual happy redemption.

100% the Story of a Patriot

Author: Upton Sinclair

Publisher: Createspace Independent Publishing Platform

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 338

View: 221

100% - The Story of a Patriot: Large Print By Upton Sinclair 100%: The Story of a Patriot is a book of fictional responses to Sinclair's real-life social and economic concerns. It tells the story of Peter Gudge, a poor young man who becomes embroiled in industrial spying and sabotage. Said to be based upon a real case of a bombing in San Francisco, Peter's tale is compelling reading. The story of the White Terror, and how "big business" pulled off the stunt of landing the "reds" in jail. It is the inside story of a "secret agent," and deals with half a dozen celebrated cases concerning which you have been fooled - the story of a young man's descent into fear and corruption, and eventual happy redemption.
Fiction

100%

Author: Upton Sinclair

Publisher: The Floating Press

ISBN:

Category: Fiction

Page: 329

View: 339

Prolific author and political activist Upton Sinclair throws the upheaval of the early twentieth century into sharp relief in 100%: The Story of a Patriot. In a matter of instants, a bomb blast transmutes Peter Gudge's entire existence into chaos, and in the resulting pandemonium, he's forced to reexamine all of his values and beliefs.

100%

Author: Upton Sinclair

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 2

View: 816

100%: the Story of a Patriot

Author: Upton Sinclair

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 126

View: 989

"I aimed at the public's heart, and by accident I hit it in the stomach." Upton Sinclair

100%: the Story of a Patriot

Author: Upton Sinclair

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 353

View: 589

"100%:The Story of a Patriot" dramatically recounts the adventures of a poor uneducated young man who lives by his wits and guile, as he becomes politicized during his involvement in the sometimes violent struggle between American "patriots" and "Reds". The author wrote in the Appendix, which is not included in this recording: "Everything that has social significance is truth.... Practically all the characters in "100%" are real persons." This exciting, polemical novel was published in 1920. Sinclair (1878-1968) wrote nearly 100 novels, many based on industrial abuse. One of his best known, "The Jungle", was influential in initiating the regulation of food safety in the United States. He won the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction in 1943. (Lee Smalley)

100% the STORY of a PATRIOT by UPTON SINCLAIR 614

Author: Upton Sinclair

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 148

View: 409

It was a big store which the police had opened up. Inside there were wounded people lying on the floor, with doctors and others attending them. Peter was marched down the corridor, and into a room where sat or stood several other men, more or less in a state of collapse like himself; people who had failed to satisfy the police, and were being held under guard.Peter's two policemen backed him against the wall and proceeded to go thru his pockets, producing the shameful contents-a soiled rag, and two cigarette butts picked up on the street, and a broken pipe, and a watch which had once cost a dollar, but was now out of order, and too badly damaged to be pawned. That was all they had any right to find, so far as Peter knew. But there came forth one thing more-the printed circular which Peter had thrust into his pocket. The policeman who pulled it out took a glance at it, and then cried, "Good God!" He stared at Peter, then he stared at the other policeman and handed him the paper.At that moment the man not in uniform entered the room. "Mr. Guffey!" cried the policeman. "See this!" The man took the paper, and glanced at it, and Peter, watching with bewildered and fascinated eyes, saw a most terrifying sight. It was as if the man went suddenly out of his mind. He glared at Peter, and under his black eyebrows the big staring eyes seemed ready to jump out of his head."Aha!" he exclaimed; and then, "So I've got you!" The hand that held the paper was trembling, and the other hand reached out like a great claw, and fastened itself in the neck of Peter's coat, and drew it together until Peter was squeezed tight. "You threw that bomb!" hissed the man."Wh-what?" gasped Peter, his voice almost fainting. "B-b-bomb?""Out with it!" cried the man, and his face came close to Peter's, his teeth gleaming as if he were going to bite off Peter's nose. "Out with it! Quick! Who helped you?""My G-God!" said Peter. "I d-dunno what you mean.""You dare lie to me?" roared the man; and he shook Peter as if he meant to jar his teeth out. "No nonsense now! Who helped you make that bomb?"Peter's voice rose to a scream of terror: "I never saw no bomb! I dunno what you're talkin' about!""You, come this way," said the man, and started suddenly toward the door. It might have been more convenient if he had turned Peter around, and got him by the back of his coat-collar; but he evidently held Peter's physical being as a thing too slight for consideration-he just kept his grip in the bosom of Peter's jacket, and half lifted him and half shoved him back out of the room, and down a long passage to the back part of the building. And all the time he was hissing into Peter's face: "I'll have it out of you! Don't think you can lie to me! Make up your mind to it, you're going to come thru!"The man opened a door. It was some kind of storeroom, and he walked Peter inside and slammed the door behind him. "Now, out with it!" he said. The man thrust into his pocket the printed circular, or whatever it was-Peter never saw it again, and never found out what was printed on it. With his free hand the man grabbed one of Peter's hands, or rather one finger of Peter's hand, and bent it suddenly backward with terrible violence. "Oh!" screamed Peter. "Stop!" And then, with a wild shriek, "You'll break it.""I mean to break it! mean to break every bone in your body! I'll tear your finger-nails out; I'll tear the eyes out of your head, if I have to! You tell me who helped you make that bomb!"Peter broke out in a storm of agonized protest; he had never heard of any bomb, he didn't know what the man was talking about; he writhed and twisted and doubled himself over backward, trying to evade the frightful pain of that pressure on his finger."You're lying!" insisted Guffey. "I know you're lying. You're one of that crowd.""What crowd? Ouch! I dunno what you mean!""You're one of them Reds, aint you?""Reds? What are Reds?"
Fiction

Palestine +100: Stories from a century after the Nakba

Author: Mazen Maarouf

Publisher: Comma Press

ISBN:

Category: Fiction

Page: 240

View: 333

Palestine + 100 poses a question to twelve Palestinian writers: what might your country look like in the year 2048 – a century after the tragedies and trauma of what has come to be called the Nakba? How might this event – which, in 1948, saw the expulsion of over 700,000 Palestinian Arabs from their homes – reach across a century of occupation, oppression, and political isolation, to shape the country and its people? Will a lasting peace finally have been reached, or will future technology only amplify the suffering and mistreatment of Palestinians? Covering a range of approaches – from SF noir, to nightmarish dystopia, to high-tech farce – these stories use the blank canvas of the future to reimagine the Palestinian experience today. Along the way, we encounter drone swarms, digital uprisings, time-bending VR, peace treaties that span parallel universes, and even a Palestinian superhero, in probably the first anthology of science fiction from Palestine ever. Translated from the Arabic by Raph Cormack, Mohamed Ghalaieny, Andrew Leber, Thoraya El-Rayyes, Yasmine Seale and Jonathan Wright. WINNER of a PEN Translates Award 2018 'It's necessary, of course. But above all it's bold, brilliant and inspiring: a sign of boundless imagination and fierce creation even in circumstances of oppression, denial, silencing and constriction. The voices of these writers demand to be heard - and their stories are defiantly entertaining.' - Bidisha

100%, the Story of a PATRIOT

Author: Upton Sinclair

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 166

View: 880

Now and then it occurs to one to reflect upon what slender threads of accident depend the most important circumstances of his life; to look back and shudder, realizing how close to the edge of nothingness his being has come. A young man is walking down the street, quite casually, with an empty mind and no set purpose; he comes to a crossing, and for no reason that he could tell he takes the right hand turn instead of the left; and so it happens that he encounters a blue-eyed girl, who sets his heart to beating. He meets the girl, marries her-and she became your mother. But now, suppose the young man had taken the left hand turn instead of the right, and had never met the blue-eyed girl; where would you be now, and what would have become of those qualities of mind which you consider of importance to the world, and those grave affairs of business to which your time is devoted?Something like that it was which befell Peter Gudge; just such an accident, changing the whole current of his life, and making the series of events with which this story deals. Peter was walking down the street one afternoon, when a woman approached and held out to him a printed leaflet. "Read this, please," she said.And Peter, who was hungry, and at odds with the world, answered gruffly: "I got no money." He thought it was an advertising dodger, and he said: "I can't buy nothin'.""It isn't anything for sale," answered the woman. "It's a message.""Religion?" said Peter. "I just got kicked out of a church.""No, not a church," said the woman. "It's something different; put it in your pocket." She was an elderly woman with gray hair, and she followed along, smiling pleasantly at this frail, poor-looking stranger, but nagging at him. "Read it some time when you've nothing else to do." And so Peter, just to get rid of her, took the leaflet and thrust it into his pocket, and went on, and in a minute or two had forgotten all about it.Peter was thinking-or rather Peter's stomach was thinking for him; for when you have had nothing to eat all day, and nothing on the day before but a cup of coffee and one sandwich, your thought-centers are transferred from the top to the middle of you. Peter was thinking that this was a hell of a life. Who could have foreseen that just because he had stolen one miserable fried doughnut, he would lose his easy job and his chance of rising in the world? Peter's whole being was concentrated on the effort to rise in the world; to get success, which means money, which means ease and pleasure-the magic names which lure all human creatures.But who could have foreseen that Mrs. Smithers would have kept count of those fried doughnuts every time anybody passed thru her pantry? And it was only that one ridiculous circumstance which had brought Peter to his present misery. But for that he might have had his lunch of bread and dried herring and weak tea in the home of the shoe-maker's wife, and might have still been busy with his job of stirring up dissension in the First Apostolic Church, otherwise known as the Holy Rollers, and of getting the Rev. Gamaliel Lunk turned out, and Shoemaker Smithers established at the job of pastor, with Peter Gudge as his right hand man.Always it had been like that, thru Peter's twenty years of life. Time after time he would get his feeble clutch fixed upon the ladder of prosperity, and then something would happen-some wretched thing like the stealing of a fried doughnut-to pry him loose and tumble him down again into the pit of misery.So Peter walked along, with his belt drawn tight, and his restless blue eyes wandering here and there, looking for a place to get a meal. There were jobs to be had, but they were hard jobs, and Peter wanted an easy one. There are people in this world who live by their muscles, and others who live by their wits; Peter belonged to the latter class; and had missed many a meal rather than descend in the social scale.