Literary Criticism

1650-1850

Author: Kevin L. Cope

Publisher: Rutgers University Press

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 420

View: 692

1650-1850 publishes essays and reviews from and about a wide range of academic disciplines—literature (both in English and other languages), philosophy, art history, history, religion, and science. Interdisciplinary in scope and approach, 1650-1850 emphasizes aesthetic manifestations and applications of ideas, and encourages studies that move between the arts and the sciences—between the “hard” and the “humane” disciplines. The editors encourage proposals for “special features” that bring together five to seven essays on focused themes within its historical range, from the Interregnum to the end of the first generation of Romantic writers. While also being open to more specialized or particular studies that match up with the general themes and goals of the journal, 1650-1850 is in the first instance a journal about the artful presentation of ideas that welcomes good writing from its contributors. First published in 1994, 1650-1850 is currently in its 24th volume. ISSN 1065-3112. Published by Bucknell University Press. Distributed worldwide by Rutgers University Press.
Medical

The Popularization of Medicine, 1650-1850

Author: Roy Porter

Publisher: Psychology Press

ISBN:

Category: Medical

Page: 297

View: 175

The Popularization of Medicine explores the rise of this form of people's medicine, from the early days of printing to the Victorian age, focusing upon the different experiences of Britain and France, more marginal European nations like Spain and Hungary, and upon North America.
History

Gender in English Society 1650-1850

Author: Robert B. Shoemaker

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 346

View: 344

A lively social history of the roles of men and women - from workplace to household, from parish church to alehouse, from market square to marriage bed. Robert Shoemaker investigates such varied topics as crime, leisure, the theatre, religious observance, notions of morality and even changing patterns of sexual activity itself.
History

America Writes Its History, 1650äóñ1850

Author: Jude M. Pfister

Publisher: McFarland

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 216

View: 338

By turns irreverent, sympathetic and amusing, America Writes Its History, 1650–1850 adds to the public discourse on national identity as advanced through the written word. Highlighting the contributions of American writers who focused on history, the author shows that for nearly 200 years writers struggled to reflect, or influence, the public perception of America by Americans. This book is an introduction to the development of history as a written art form, and an academic discipline, during America’s most crucial and impressionable period. America Writes Its History, 1650–1850 takes the reader on a historical tour of written histories—whether narrative history, novels, memoirs or plays—from the Jamestown Colony to the edge of the Civil War. What exactly did we, as Americans, think of ourselves? And more importantly; What did we want non–Americans to think of us? In other words, what was (and is) history, and who, if anyone, owns it?
History

Transactions of the Royal Historical Society: Volume 8

Author: Royal Historical Society

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 396

View: 404

Volume 8 of The Royal Historical Society Transactions contains essays based around the theme 'identities and empires'.
Literary Criticism

Warrior Women and Popular Balladry, 1650-1850

Author: Dianne Dugaw

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 233

View: 843

Masquerading as a man, seeking adventure, going to war or to sea for love and glory, the transvestite heroine flourished in all kinds of literature, especially ballads, from the Renaissance to the Victorian age. Warrior Women and Popular Balladry, 1650-1850 identifies this heroine and her significance as a figure in folklore, and as a representative of popular culture, prompting important reevaluations of gender and sexuality. Dugaw has uncovered a fascination with women cross-dressers in the popular literature of early modern Europe and America. Surveying a wide range of Anglo-American texts from popular ballads and chapbook life histories to the comedies and tragedies of aristocratic literature, she demonstrates the extent to which gender and sexuality are enacted as constructs of history.
History

Protestant Communalism in the Trans-Atlantic World, 1650–1850

Author: Philip Lockley

Publisher: Springer

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 230

View: 264

This book explores the trans-Atlantic history of Protestant traditions of communalism – communities of shared property. The sixteenth-century Reformation may have destroyed monasticism in northern Europe, but Protestant Christianity has not always denied common property. Between 1650 and 1850, a range of Protestant groups adopted communal goods, frequently after crossing the Atlantic to North America: the Ephrata community, the Shakers, the Harmony Society, the Community of True Inspiration, and others. Early Mormonism also developed with a communal dimension, challenging its surrounding Protestant culture of individualism and the free market. In a series of focussed and survey studies, this book recovers the trans-Atlantic networks and narratives, ideas and influences, which shaped Protestant communalism across two centuries of early modernity.
History

Scientists and the Sea, 1650–1900

Author: Margaret Deacon

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 504

View: 398

Scientists and the Sea is a history of how the scientific study of the sea has developed over a period of nearly 2500 years. Beginning with the speculations of Greek philosophers it carries the story forward, showing how curiosity about the ocean appeared in many different forms and locations before, in the late 19th century, the first deep-sea researches heralded the foundation of the science known today as oceanography. Originally published in 1971, this book has never been superseded as the most comprehensive and wide-ranging treatment of the emergence of marine science within the western scientific tradition. After three introductory chapters dealing with knowledge up to the Renaissance, the main part of the work shows how pioneers of scientific observation at sea during the 17th and 18th centuries made notable discoveries, but that it was not until the middle of the 19th century when, aided by the advance of technology, scientists were able to undertake the first explorations of the ocean depths. This second edition contains a new introduction and bibliography.
Religion

Christian-Muslim Relations. A Bibliographical History Volume 8. Northern and Eastern Europe (1600-1700)

Author:

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 1032

View: 183

Christian-Muslim Relations, a Bibliographical History, volume 8 (CMR 8) is a history of everything that was written on relations in the period 1600-1700 in Northern and Eastern Europe. Its detailed entries contain descriptions, assessments and comprehensive bibliographical details about individual works.

Special Lists

Author: National Archives (U.S.)

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category:

Page:

View: 970

History

Crow's Range

Author: David Beesley

Publisher: University of Nevada Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 464

View: 103

John Muir called it the "Range of Light, the most divinely beautiful of all the mountain chains I’ve ever seen." The Sierra Nevada—a single unbroken mountain range stretching north to south over four hundred miles, best understood as a single ecosystem but embracing a number of environmental communities—has been the site of human activity for millennia. From the efforts of ancient Native Americans to encourage game animals by burning brush to create meadows to the burgeoning resort and residential development of the present, the Sierra has endured, and often suffered from, the efforts of humans to exploit its bountiful resources for their own benefit. Historian David Beesley examines the history of the Sierra Nevada from earliest times, beginning with a comprehensive discussion of the geologic development of the range and its various ecological communities. Using a wide range of sources, including the records of explorers and early settlers, scientific and government documents, and newspaper reports, Beesley offers a lively and informed account of the history, environmental challenges, and political controversies that lie behind the breathtaking scenery of the Sierra. Among the highlights are discussions of the impact of the Gold Rush and later mining efforts, as well as the supporting industries that mining spawned, including logging, grazing, water-resource development, market hunting, urbanization, and transportation; the politics and emotions surrounding the establishment of Yosemite and other state and national parks; the transformation of the Hetch Hetchy into a reservoir and the desertification of the once-lush Owens Valley; the roles of the Forest Service, Park Service, and other regulatory agencies; the consequences of the fateful commitment to wildfire suppression in Sierran forests; and the ever-growing impact of tourism and recreational use. Through Beesley’s wide-ranging discussion, John Muir’s "divinely beautiful" range is revealed in all its natural and economic complexity, a place that at the beginning of the twenty-first century is in grave danger of being loved to death. Available in hardcover and paperback.
History

The Reformist Ideas of Samuel Johnson

Author: Stefka Ritchie

Publisher: Cambridge Scholars Publishing

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 315

View: 300

This book explores what remains an under-studied aspect of Samuel Johnson’s profile as a person and writer – namely, his attitude to social improvement. The interpretive framework provided here is cross-disciplinary, and applies perspectives from social and cultural history, legal history, architectural history and, of course, English literature. This allows Johnson’s writings to be read against the peculiarities of their historical milieu, and reveals Johnson in a new light – as an advocate of social improvement for human betterment. Considering the multiplicity of narrative modes that have been employed, the book points to the blurred boundaries and overlapping between history, testimony and fiction, and argues that a future biography of Samuel Johnson has to recognise that throughout his life he valued the utilitarian aspect of his manifesto as a writer to impart a more charitable attitude in the pursuit of a more caring society.
History

Parameters of British Naval Power, 1650-1850

Author: Michael Duffy

Publisher: University of Exeter Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 144

View: 341

A searching collection of investigations into British naval power in the closing centuries of the sailing ship era. The discussions focus on the later seventeenth century strategy of a 'big ship' battlefleet; the setting up of a Western Squadron post-1689; naval recruiting; naval power and foreign policy; and the administration of the early Victorian navy and the coming of steam.
Literary Criticism

Joyce and the Jews

Author: Ira Bruce Hadel

Publisher: Springer

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 290

View: 679

Nadel examines Joyce's identification with the dislocated Jew after his exodus from Ireland and analyzes the influence which Rabbinical hermeneutics and Judaic textuality had on his language. Biographical and historical information is used as well as Joyce's texts and critical theory.
Social Science

Cooking in Europe, 1650-1850

Author: Ivan P. Day

Publisher: ABC-CLIO

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 200

View: 812

From the Baroque Era to the Victorian Era, 1650-1850, unprecedented changes took place in the food ways and dining habits of European society. This daily life aspect of history comes alive for students and food enthusiasts as they read and try out these recipes, most translated into English for the first time. There are nearly 200 recipes, organized overall by the mini-periods of the Baroque and Rococo Era, the Reign of Louis XV to the French Revolution, and the reign of Napoleon to the Victorian Era. Author Ivan Day, a renowned food historian who specializes in meticulous recreation of these amazing dishes for museum exhibitions, makes them accessible with clear explanations of techniques and unusual ingredients. Recipes include examples from France, Italy, England, Austria, Germany, Holland, Portugal, Spain, and Scotland, from the simple Salad of Pomegranate from La Varenne Careme's 1651 cookbook to the elaborate Boar's Head in Galantine of Careme's 1833 cookbook. This unique cookbook is a culinary treasure trove to complement all European History library collections. As Day shows in his narrative and recipes, the principal theme in the story of food during the two centuries is the rapid spread of French fine cooking throughout Europe and its gradual percolation down the social scale. However, despite the domination of French cuisine at higher levels, most nations managed to cling proudly to their own indigenous traditions. A lively introduction explains the dramatic shift in culinary taste led by the exuberant creativity of French cooks. Cookbooks started to emerge from the Paris printing presses after a hundred years of silence. Numerous innovations completely transformed French cuisine and swept away all remnants of lingering medieval taste. There were new efficient cooking techniques for the kitchens of powerful and wealthy. For all, there were new ingredients from New World and new cooking mediums such as the mechanical spit and roasting ranges that made cooking cleaner and less back breaking. The recipes, each with a short explanation, are organized by type of dish. Categories include salads and cold dishes; soups; meat; poultry; fish and seafood; vegetables and fungi; eggs and dairy; sauces; savory pastries; starches, pastas, and legumes; breads and cakes; sweet pastries and puddings; fruit, nuts, and flower preserves; sweets and confections; jellies and ices; and drinks. Occasional sidebars offer period menus of, for example, elaborate feasts. A glossary and an appendix listing suppliers of equipment and ingredients are added features.

The History of Suicide in England, 1650-1850

Author: Mark Robson

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 1808

View: 148

This two-part, eight-volume, reset edition draws together a range of sources from the early modern era through to the industrial age, to show the changes and continuities in responses to the social, political, legal and spiritual problems that self-murder posed.
History

Book Collections of Clerics in Norway, 1650–1750

Author: Gina Dahl

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 365

View: 269

By examining clerical book collections in Norway 1650–1750, this book describes the flow of books in one of the northernmost areas of Europe, a flow dependant on three networking areas in particular, namely Germany, the Netherlands and England.
Social Science

A Certain Share of Low Cunning

Author: David J. Cox

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 208

View: 922

This book provides an account and analysis of the history of the Bow Street Runners, precursors of today's police force. Through a detailed analysis of a wide range of both qualitative and quantitative research data, this book provides a fresh insight into their history, arguing that the use of Bow Street personnel in provincially instigated cases was much more common than has been assumed by many historians. It also demonstrates that the range of activities carried out by Bow Street personnel whilst employed on such cases was far more complex than can be gleaned from the majority of books and articles concerning early nineteenth-century provincial policing, which often do little more than touch on the role of Bow Street. By describing the various roles and activities of the Bow Street Principal Officers with specific regard to cases originating in the provinces it also places them firmly within the wider contexts of provincial law-enforcement and policing history. The book investigates the types of case in which the 'Runners' were involved, who employed them and why, how they operated, including their interaction with local law-enforcement bodies, and how they were perceived by those who utilized their services. It also discusses the legacy of the Principal Officers with regard to subsequent developments within policing. Bow Street Police Office and its personnel have long been regarded by many historians as little more than a discrete and often inconsequential footnote to the history of policing, leading to a partial and incomplete understanding of their work. This viewpoint is challenged in this book, which argues that in several ways the utilization of Principal Officers in provincially instigated cases paved the way for important subsequent developments in policing, especially with regard to detective practices. It is also the first work to provide a clear distinction between the Principal Officers and their less senior colleagues.
History

Women's History

Author: Hannah Barker

Publisher: Psychology Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 288

View: 618

A wide-ranging, thematic survey of women's history in Britain in the 18th and early 19th centuries, with chapters written by both well-established writers and new and dynamic scholars in a thorough and well-balanced selection.