Fiction

A Firefighter's Ultimate Duty

Author: Beverly Long

Publisher: Harlequin

ISBN:

Category: Fiction

Page: 288

View: 233

A local hero must put his life on the line in the ultimate mission Firefighter Blade Savick keeps his eyes on his job…not on his white-hot desire for a single mom! Especially when Daisy Rambler insists all she wants is a fresh start for herself and her daughter. Once Blade bonds with Daisy on a level he never imagined, a menace from her past rears its ugly head. But can Blade rescue Daisy…and their chance at a new life together? From Harlequin Romantic Suspense: Danger. Passion. Drama. Feel the excitement in these uplifting romances, part of the Heroes of the Pacific Northwest series: Book 1: A Firefighter's Ultimate Duty
Medical

Fundamentals of Fire Fighter Skills

Author: International Association of Fire Chiefs

Publisher: Jones & Bartlett Learning

ISBN:

Category: Medical

Page: 1030

View: 611

Fire fighter stories of dreams realized, bravery tested, and lives saved. Twelve men and women who haved devoted their lives to saving others tell their stories.
Medical

Emergency Medical Services

Author: David Cone

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN:

Category: Medical

Page: 1064

View: 897

Emergency Medical Services: Clinical Practice and SystemsOversight is the official textbook of the National Associationof EMS Physicians™ (NAEMSP™) National EMS MedicalDirectors Course and Practicum™. Now paired with a companion website featuring self-assessmentexercises, audio and video clips of EMS best practices in action,and more, this essential study aid guides students through the coreknowledge they need to successfully complete their training andbegin their careers as EMS physicians. Emergency Medical Services: Clinical Practice and SystemsOversight consists of: Volume 1: Clinical Aspects of EMS Volume 2: Medical Oversight of EMS Companion website featuring supportive self-assessmentexercises, audio and video clips
Business & Economics

Becoming a Firefighter

Author: Jeff Wilser

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN:

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 176

View: 404

A revealing guide to a career as a firefighter written by acclaimed author Jeff Wilser and based on the real-life experiences of the heroes of the St. Louis fire department—required reading for anyone considering a path to this profession. Becoming a Firefighter takes you behind the scenes to find out what it’s really like, and what it really takes, to become a firefighter. Author Jeff Wilser imbeds with one of the oldest departments in the country, the St. Louis Fire Department, to show how this high-stakes profession becomes a reality. Discover what it’s like to fight a three-alarm blaze; attend fire academy; prepare for routine calls; and rigorously train for worst-case scenarios. Gain professional wisdom from the beloved fire chief as well as a decorated 25-year veteran field commander. Firefighting is a calling, and those who choose this path are devoted to their work—here is how this life-saving job is actually performed by the best in the field.
History

Public Pensions

Author: Susan M. Sterett

Publisher: Cornell University Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 240

View: 465

In Public Pensions, Susan M. Sterett traces the legal and constitutional structures underlying early social welfare programs in the United States. Sterett explains the status of state and local government payments for public servants and the poor from the mid-nineteenth century until the Great Depression. The most visible public payments for service in the United States were directed to soldiers, who risked death for the nation. However, firemen, not soldiers, first captured local governments' attention; social welfare programs for soldiers were modeled on firemen's pensions. The dangerous work of firefighting and of combat provided the fundamental legal analogy for courts as governments expanded pensions in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Nothing about the state court doctrine approving payments for dangerous, local service would allow pensions for indigent mothers and for the elderly, which states began to consider after 1910. Counties and railroads that objected to the new taxes could fight programs based on the old doctrine, established for firefighters, soldiers, and finally civil servants. State litigation provided one of the many grounds for contesting expanded welfare states in the early twentieth-century United States. Sterett demonstrates that state courts maintained a gendered division between the service that marked citizenship and the dependence that marked indigence, even during the promising ferment of the early twentieth century.